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Re: [earlyflute] Re: Stopper position

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  • BknSky@aol.com
    ... middle joints for different tunings? If it does, do you feel that it responds better with one than the others, or does it play equally well with all of
    Message 1 of 31 , Mar 1, 2004
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      >>Out of curiosity, does your flute have corps de rechange / additional
      middle joints for different tunings? If it does, do you feel that it
      responds better with one than the others, or does it play equally well
      with all of them?<<
       
      No, g -- my flute, a Polak Beuker, only has a 415 middle joint, so I realize that I might have a slightly different opinion if I were to have additional middle joints and use them all with some frequency.  Simon will not make flutes with wide interval swings for this reason, believing the flute plays best at no more than a few cents, (in the case of the Beuker, he makes a middle drop to 408, which is where the flute, apparently, plays its most optimal).  I can't imagine, then, that too much of a cork adjustment would be necessary.
      I'm of the school that feels similarly -- I've never liked the compromises made in a flute that swings from 415 to 440, cork position notwithstanding.  For 440, I'd prefer a flute made to play there.  In that pitch, I play more modern flutes (19th c. based), as I think they sound better than baroques at 440, overall.

      >>I never moved the cork in my metal flute, but when i got a wooden
      headjoint for it a couple of years ago, i found out that moving the
      stopper about 1.5 mm towards the blowhole made the 3rd octave much
      more in tune without messing up the low end. So i guess there's some
      value in moving the stopper in Boehm flutes too. After i found the
      ideal position, i left it there.<<<
      There may be -- I've never really messed with my stopper on my Boehm, either; again, it seems to play its low and high end strongly at its current setting -- to mess with it, I think, would in some way compromise one or the other end, although an incremental change probably wouldn't.  Still, most incremental tuning is done by me, my embouchure, and not the stopper.
      I respect and accept, however, that there are many far superior players to me with far finer ears than mine, and that they might very well discern subtle intonation difficulties that, frankly, I don't hear or, perhaps, which simply doesn't bother me.  Years of guitar intonation tuning and then flute ITM has probably allowed my ear to accept a far wider range of tonal disharmony than it may have had I focused solely on baroque music on the traverso.
      Or, perhaps it was a good training ground; piano may have made the adjustment impossible. 
      Still, re cork placement, it seems to me that there is probably a median, compromise spot on any given flute that allows a flute to play its intended pitch across the octaves, and the rest, fussiness notwithstanding, is probably more a matter of the player, their ear, and their lip than any mechanical adjustment.
      Gordon
    • Susan Maclagan
      Hi, Thanks to g and David for their input as to the possibility of using carbon fibre for earlyflutes. g wrote: my favourite idea there are the magnets used
      Message 31 of 31 , Mar 4, 2004
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        Hi,

        Thanks to 'g' and David for their input as to the
        possibility of using carbon fibre for earlyflutes.

        g wrote: my
        favourite idea there are the magnets used in place of
        sproings.

        Yes, I like that idea as well.

        I wrote: Be interesting to see an early flute made
        > from the material.

        G responded: Yes. The modern flute is a piece of cake
        compared to the traverso. The
        modern flute is basically a pipe with a little bit of
        fancy tapering
        on the head. The traverso on the other hand, has
        varying conicity, and
        probably intentional perturbations in the bore too. I
        wonder how you
        ream carbon fibre (diamond reamers?).

        Good point, g. Forgot about the bore of the early
        flute.

        Best,
        Susan


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