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Re: Jazz..

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  • apossibleworld
    Of course it s difficult if you ve learned by a different method, but this ties in nicely with the history of flute playing, with different traditions
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 17, 2012
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      Of course it's difficult if you've learned by a different method, but this ties in nicely with the history of flute playing, with different traditions simultaneously using the same instruments, and sharing their knowledge.

      Satosius, the thing I would recommend to you the most is to sing. Put down the flute, or just hold it to the side, and just use your voice. And don't think too hard. Trying to imagine bar lines in your head will just confuse you more than you need. Hear a melody in your head and vocalize it. Then you can bring the flute back, and it will be much more natural. Start with something that has simple chord changes, maybe a 12 bar blues progression. You'll get the hang of it.

      I'm sure that in the 18th and 19th centuries, there being no turntables and MP3 players, and satellite radios, a basic understanding of music shared through singing, and there wasn't quite the same separation we may think of today between musicians and non-musicians. When improvisation becomes natural on an early flute, it's really just a matter of singing through the instrument. This is more clear on traverso and 8-key than on a Boehm flute, as there are no non-linear key mechanisms. I hadn't quite thought of it this way before now, but I do believe it.



      --- In earlyflute@yahoogroups.com, "satosius" <satosius@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi everyone,
      >
      > Difficulties to play without any musical note have fully realized.
      > Counting up number of bar lines without musical note is extremely difficult for an amateur musician! there is no way other than heavy training, oh boy..
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Satosius
      >
      >
    • keithfre
      ... Don t worry, Satosius, you will eventually develop a feeling for the four-bar and eight-bar phrases used in jazz. You can help it along by counting the
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 17, 2012
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        > Counting up number of bar lines without musical note is extremely difficult for an amateur musician!

        Don't worry, Satosius, you will eventually develop a feeling for the four-bar and eight-bar phrases used in jazz. You can help it along by counting the bars while you are listening to jazz.

        The Konokol method is a good way of doing this, as it involves your body:
        beat 1: clap your hands
        beat 2: tap your other palm with finger 5 (little finger, as in piano fingering)
        beat 3: tap your palm with finger 4
        beat 4: tap your palm with finger 3

        Once you have mastered this you can omit beats 2-4 and just clap on beat 1 while saying the bar numbers 1 to 4 or 1 to 8.

        Hope this helps,
        -Keith (jazz guitarist as well as baroque flutist)
      • Mary Kirkpatrick
        Passing this on from an unfortunate colleague -- and yes, I ve put it also on the hautboyresearch listserve -- I m hoping for your indulgence because the
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 30, 2012
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          Passing this on from an unfortunate colleague -- and yes, I've put it
          also on the "hautboyresearch" listserve -- I'm hoping for your
          indulgence because the "earlyflute" list is a lot bigger and so it
          means more people in and out of antique shops, etc..:

          Dear all,
          As some of you may know, thief recently broke into my apartment in
          Amsterdam. Among other things, they took the baroque oboe d'amore
          that Alfredo Bernardini, my teacher, lent me. ...you may recognize
          the stolen oboe d'amore by the slightly oval shape of the bore at the
          lower end of the middle joint. There is no stamp or serial number.
          Please spread the word and contact me if you see a similar instrument
          for sale anywhere.
          Hoping for the best,
          Daniel Lanthier <daniel.lanthier@...>


          [Daniel included "a picture of a similar instrument" -- it is a
          standard nice-looking baroque d'amore: unstained box, no mounts, two
          brass keys -- happy to forward if you like.]
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