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Re: [earlyflute] an introduction

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  • Philippe Allain-Dupré
    Hi Robbie Welcome aboard. A tip if you are interested in the history of tuning: First read Bruce Haynes article
    Message 1 of 37 , Nov 1, 2011
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      Hi Robbie
      Welcome aboard.
      A tip if you are interested in the history of tuning:
      First read Bruce Haynes' article http://www.hoboy.net/Hoboy/BeyondTemperament.html
      Then use Quantz enharmonics fingerings, with if possible a two-keyed flute with d# and eflat!
      A new world comes to light!
      Good luck
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Monday, October 31, 2011 6:34 PM
      Subject: [earlyflute] an introduction

       

      Greetings Early Flute Folks,

      I'm a new member here and just wanted to introduce myself. I am a long-time woodwind player, but a fairly new convert to baroque traverso. However, the bug has bit, so to speak, and I think I'm hooked for life. My background is actually more in improvised music (I grew up playing jazz), and while I perform professionally, early music performance is a place I haven't gone yet. But I've been an avid listener and student for a long time.

      As far as instruments go, I find myself especially attracted to the dark and mysterious sounds of the early baroque instruments at low pitch. I recently bought a used Simon Polak Wijne flute from somebody local to me (New York City), and while it's probably not the most conventional sounding instrument, I'm really enjoying it. I expect I'll end up buying at least a few more flutes (perhaps soon), and I've probably looked at every builder's website in the past couple weeks. I see that Mr. Cameron is a frequent poster here, and the one instrument of his that I played, a Naust I believe, was truly spectacular.

      One of the things that I find most transfixing about traverso is its inherent possibility for subtle pitch control, not just with embouchure but with fingerings. I've been very interested in the history of tuning, and how non-equal temperament works in practice. As an improviser, I like to think of myself as a microtonal player, using an awareness of, for instance, what a major third sounds and feels like when it is pure, or tempered in one direction or another, and how much. There's really a huge impact you can have with a small difference. On the traverso, especially as you rise in pitch, alternate fingerings can yield maybe four different discreet notes in the space of a half step. Pretty amazing to me. I look forward to exploring this space much more. And I also look forward to more traditional playing, and finding a new direction for me there, in composed music. So I'm perhaps not the most typical traverso-ist, but very glad to be a part.

      thanks for having me here,

      Robbie Lee

    • Mary Kirkpatrick
      Thank you Rod! I ll pass the music on to a local traverso player, along with this email. It sure looks intriguing. Nothing like modern compositions for 18th
      Message 37 of 37 , Nov 5, 2011
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        Thank you Rod! I'll pass the music on to a local traverso player,
        along with this email. It sure looks intriguing. Nothing like
        modern compositions for 18th century instruments to give us
        perspective and a new appreciation for what we're all doing...

        Mary




        >I should have included this email, so you may use the pieces with
        >confidence that you have approval
        >
        >Dear Rod,
        >
        >Here I am attaching pdf copies of dad's scores: both versions of
        >"To Invoke the Clouds."
        >
        >Feel free to pass these on to whomever needs them, tell them just to
        >get in touch with me at this email if they choose to perform them!
        >
        >Thanks very much
        >
        >Diana Thow Diana Thow <dianathow@...>
        >
        >
        >On Nov 3, 2011, at 10:51 PM, Rod Cameron wrote:
        >
        >> <To Invoke the Clouds (duo).pdf>
        >>
        >> <To Invoke the Clouds (solo).pdf>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >>
        >
        >Rod Cameron
        >PO Box 438, 10580 William Street
        >Mendocino, CA 95460, USA
        >Mobile Phone: 707 813 7593
        >Home: 707 937 9921
        >Studio ( no messages) 707 937 0412
        >http://picasaweb.google.com/rodcameron2/
        >Skype: scotflute
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >------------------------------------
        >
        >Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
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