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Rockstro & Carte

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  • Marta Femenía
    Hi all, What are the differences between Rockstro s model and Carte s 1851/1867 system? best regards Marta Femenía
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 2 9:57 AM
      Hi all,

      What are the differences between Rockstro's model and Carte's 1851/1867 system?

      best regards
      Marta Femenía
    • Rick at CIT
      ... Here is a short answer. First, all three are open-key system flutes with cylindrical bores. All keys stand open when the fingers are off the flute (except
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 2 11:39 AM
        Marta Fermenia wrote:
        > What are the differences between Rockstro's model and Carte's
        1851/1867 system?
        Here is a short answer.
         
        First, all three are open-key system flutes with cylindrical bores. 
        All keys stand open when the fingers are off the flute (except
        that the D# key is expected to be opened with the right hand little
        finger).  (A few duplicate and trill keys are also exceptions.)
        So all notes are well vented and the flutes are loud and even in tone.
         
        The Rockstro Model is a wooden Boehm-system flute with large holes,
        perforated keys, an open G# key, an extra F# lever, and several other
        features and adjustments advocated by Rockstro.
         
        The two Carte system flutes were motivated by Boehm’s work, but
        are not Boehm flutes.  They use Carte’s systems, of course.   Common
        to both the 1851 system and 1867 system are that the right hand first
        finger gives F#, not F natural, and the Bb thumb lever is below the
        B thumb lever.  F natural can be obtained on both as on the simple
        system flute with a short F key, while the 1867 system has a second
        touch for RH1 to give F natural and the 1851 system has something
        like a long F key and also allows the forked fingering for F.  More details
        are here:
         
        Rick Wilson
         
      • Robert Bigio
        ... I would like to add a few things to Rick s excellent explanation. There are Rockstro models of most of the flutes made by Rudall, Rose & Carte and later
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 5 2:12 AM
          Rick at CIT writes:

          >The Rockstro Model is a wooden Boehm-system flute with large holes,
          >perforated keys, an open G# key, an extra F# lever, and several other
          >features and adjustments advocated by Rockstro.

          I would like to add a few things to Rick's excellent explanation. There
          are Rockstro models of most of the flutes made by Rudall, Rose & Carte
          and later Rudall Carte: the conical Boehm; Carte's 'Old System' (a flute
          with a bore like Boehm's 1847 cylindrical flute but with simple-system
          fingerings); Carte's 1851 Patent; Carte's 1867 Patent and the standard
          Boehm. The common factor in Rockstro's variations on these flutes is the
          huge toneholes.

          The final version of the Rockstro flute is essentially a standard Boehm,
          although I expect Rockstro would have been furious with anyone who said
          this. The Rockstro model Boehm flute existed in silver, wood and ebonite
          (he was keen on this material) and in closed and open hole versions,
          with some closed G sharp examples as well as the more common open G
          sharp ones. Many of the open-holed examples have plugs for the holes.

          Some Rockstro model Boehm-style flutes have very tall C sharp chimneys.
          Some have an extra key for the left hand first finger that allows an
          easy B to C sharp trill and includes a tiny extra vent hole. Most have
          what Rockstro called a vented D, which is an extra trill key between the
          thumb key and the D trill key, which gives a decent-sounding D natural
          when opened.

          Rockstro's fingering design was used by Rudall Carte on flutes with
          normal-sized holes. The flute used by Gareth Morris during his long
          career in the Philharmonia Orchestra was one of these. This flute had an
          open G sharp, a Rockstro F sharp, and reversed trill keys with the
          vented D, but it had covered holes.

          Please forgive me for this shameless plug for my new book, Rudall, Rose
          & Carte: The Art of the Flute in Britain, which contains photographs of
          every type of Rockstro flute and scores of other flutes, too.

          Robert.

          --
          Robert Bigio
          Robert@...
          Now published: Rudall, Rose & Carte: The Art of the Flute in Britain
          www.bigio.com/rudallrosecarte.html
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