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A recent CD carving new territory in finding common ground between early music and Scots tradition

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  • Rod Cameron
    I receive hundreds of CD s from flute players, and am honoured to have them as a reference, to enjoy and keep abreast of what is happening out there in the
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010
      I receive hundreds of CD's from flute players, and am honoured to have them as a reference, to enjoy and keep abreast of what is happening out there in the performing world, from the relative isolation of my workshop. I rarely comment here on them, great as they are, except when I sense that some new ground is being broken.

      Chris Norman is known to many who read and contribute to earlyflute, and indeed, frequent contributers like our colleague, Philippe Allain Dupré, and Rachel Brown, Marten Root, Janet See, Lisa Beznosuik, and others have performed with him, and taught at the Boxwood Music week in Nova Scotia. Furthermore, flute making colleagues like Philippe, Patrick Olwell, Ralph Sweetheart, and others have made some excellent flutes for Chris, so I think this might be worth posting, as my intention is to comment on the big picture.

      It was with anticipation and joy that I opened the padded envelope, and cast an eye over a New CD:  "Let Me In This Ae Night"  signaling a new breakthrough in drawing  various genres of music onto one canvas. This is a duo recording with Chris N on various flutes and small pipes, together with David Greenberg on baroque violin and octave-low violin.

      Although I have been in the crowd at Boxwood some years ago, en passant, I have not yet had a chance to ceilidh with David in a quiet moment and I do look forward to that in the future, but in the meantime, with this duo CD, I did get a chance to hang out  and drink in the combined sound of strings and wind, in a way that is particularly appealing to me, given my background as a Scot fireside singer, occasional fiddler, Cape Breton champion, and a mingler/ appreciator in the 18th century  earlymusic movement. Having read something of David's career, I  applaud any string player firing on all chakras from the solar plexus on up. I do wish more of us Scots could wield their instruments with the same passion, skill, style, and informed scholarship that he and Chris bring to bear, reminding us that the Scots/Cape Breton heritage shines brighter when delivered with masterful playing. In their direct juxtaposition with the 18th century continental art form, these two artists demonstrate that indeed it was only a very few short steps for Nathaniel Gow and others to move from the formal chamber music recital, to the dance floor and wild Strathspeys, in 18th century Edinburgh.

      I do not mean this brief email to be a full review of the new work, only to say that I am delighted to have it, and play it often. I have posted previously on the general subject of dance 'groove' and early music playing, so hold this in that context.

      More about the project at:


      Meanwhile, I stepped out of my workshop on Saturday and walked down to the cliff edge to look out on a very rough Pacific Ocean at 1.30pm, the estimated time for the arrival here of the tsunami propagating out from the Chile earthquake at the speed of a jet plane. The waves were almost thirty feet high from a local storm, and I was not able to see any tsunami effect mixed in with the local weather. Later I learned that the expected strength of the wave did not materialize. However, better safe than sorry!
       
      best wishes! 

      Rod

      PO Box 438
      10580 Williams Street
      Mendocino, 
      CA 95460,  USA
      Home 707 937 9921
      Mobile: 707 813 7593 (best !)



    • Philippe Allain-Dupré
      ... From: Rod Cameron To: earlyflute@yahoogroups.com Sent: Monday, March 01, 2010 11:25 PM Subject: [earlyflute] A recent CD carving new territory in finding
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 1, 2010

         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Monday, March 01, 2010 11:25 PM
        Subject: [earlyflute] A recent CD carving new territory in finding common ground between early music and Scots tradition
        Furthermore, flute making colleagues like Philippe, Patrick Olwell, Ralph Sweetheart, and others have made some excellent flutes for Chris, so I think this might be worth posting, as my intention is to comment on the big picture.

        Hi Rod
        you are too modest:
        Is not the main flute of Chris made by a famous Scott maker on this list? after another Scott maker Rudall? to play Scott tunes?
        Thanks for all this Rod,
        best
        philippe
      • Rod Cameron
        I apologize ... something went wrong with the font size on my last posting ?? Just found a site where the CD tracks may be previewed or downloaded:
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 2, 2010
          I apologize ... something went wrong with the font size on my last posting ??  Just found a site where the CD tracks may be previewed or downloaded:



          Rod

          On Mar 1, 2010, at 2:25 PM, Rod Cameron wrote:

           

          I receive hundreds of CD's from flute players, and am honoured to have them as a reference, to enjoy and keep abreast of what is happening out there in the performing world, from the relative isolation of my workshop. I rarely comment here on them, great as they are, except when I sense that some new ground is being broken.

          Chris Norman is known to many who read and contribute to earlyflute, and indeed, frequent contributers like our colleague, Philippe Allain Dupré, and Rachel Brown, Marten Root, Janet See, Lisa Beznosuik, and others have performed with him, and taught at the Boxwood Music week in Nova Scotia. Furthermore, flute making colleagues like Philippe, Patrick Olwell, Ralph Sweetheart, and others have made some excellent flutes for Chris, so I think this might be worth posting, as my intention is to comment on the big picture.

          It was with anticipation and joy that I opened the padded envelope, and cast an eye over a New CD:  "Let Me In This Ae Night"  signaling a new breakthrough in drawing  various genres of music onto one canvas. This is a duo recording with Chris N on various flutes and small pipes, together with David Greenberg on baroque violin and octave-low violin.

          Although I have been in the crowd at Boxwood some years ago, en passant, I have not yet had a chance to ceilidh with David in a quiet moment and I do look forward to that in the future, but in the meantime, with this duo CD, I did get a chance to hang out  and drink in the combined sound of strings and wind, in a way that is particularly appealing to me, given my background as a Scot fireside singer, occasional fiddler, Cape Breton champion, and a mingler/ appreciator in the 18th century  earlymusic movement. Having read something of David's career, I  applaud any string player firing on all chakras from the solar plexus on up. I do wish more of us Scots could wield their instruments with the same passion, skill, style, and informed scholarship that he and Chris bring to bear, reminding us that the Scots/Cape Breton heritage shines brighter when delivered with masterful playing. In their direct juxtaposition with the 18th century continental art form, these two artists demonstrate that indeed it was only a very few short steps for Nathaniel Gow and others to move from the formal chamber music recital, to the dance floor and wild Strathspeys, in 18th century Edinburgh.

          I do not mean this brief email to be a full review of the new work, only to say that I am delighted to have it, and play it often. I have posted previously on the general subject of dance 'groove' and early music playing, so hold this in that context.

          More about the project at:


          Meanwhile, I stepped out of my workshop on Saturday and walked down to the cliff edge to look out on a very rough Pacific Ocean at 1.30pm, the estimated time for the arrival here of the tsunami propagating out from the Chile earthquake at the speed of a jet plane. The waves were almost thirty feet high from a local storm, and I was not able to see any tsunami effect mixed in with the local weather. Later I learned that the expected strength of the wave did not materialize. However, better safe than sorry!
           
          best wishes! 

          Rod

          PO Box 438
          10580 Williams Street
          Mendocino, 
          CA 95460,  USA
          Home 707 937 9921
          Mobile: 707 813 7593 (best !)





          PO Box 438
          10580 Williams Street
          Mendocino, 
          CA 95460,  USA
          Home 707 937 9921
          Mobile: 707 813 7593 (best !)



        • Ron
          This is yet another of those occasions where it is difficult to comment without appearing to be some sort of curmudgeonly killjoy, but it is with a sense of
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 4, 2010
            This is yet another of those occasions where it is difficult to comment without appearing to be some sort of curmudgeonly killjoy, but it is with a sense of some astonishment that I realise that performers continue to expect to promote themselves by offering recordings to be sold, at a price.

            With so many so keen to give it away, to stand a chance to gain the attention, one is so habituated to listening for free, if the time is available at all. Over the past few months I have played as much as 20 percent perhaps, of that which I'd wanted to find the time for, and that's with regard to baroque chamber music, a very small part of what is available nowadays.

            Should I therefore listen to them all but cut them short, a fifth of the way into every track, or should I look for a way to select a few to be completely heard in the hope that I don't miss out on too much by neglecting the rest? The irony and the difficulty is that most of it is impeccable, because the competition has pushed the standard to such a height, so who then to choose? At any rate, this is the reality, the choice to make, not an exaggeration.

            From time to time I'd thought to recommend an artist or write a review, but it is then so unfair to attend to any one of them while others just as good are forced to the wayside for no particular reason except that the market is flooded, to the extent that a listener is drowned by his own enthusiasm.

            By the way, I follow this via the yahoo website, where all the text appears in the same font and any images that were included with a message fail to appear. In the words of George Bernard Shaw:

            "The single biggest problem in communication is the illusion that it has taken place"

            R.H.



            --- In earlyflute@yahoogroups.com, Rod Cameron <rcameron@...> wrote:
            >
            > I apologize ... something went wrong with the font size on my last
            > posting ?? Just found a site where the CD tracks may be previewed or
            > downloaded:
            >
            > https://www.cdbaby.com/cd/normangreenburg
            >
            >
            > Rod
            >
            > On Mar 1, 2010, at 2:25 PM, Rod Cameron wrote:
            >
            > >
            > > I receive hundreds of CD's from flute players, and am honoured to
            > > have them as a reference, to enjoy and keep abreast of what is
            > > happening out there in the performing world, from the relative
            > > isolation of my workshop. I rarely comment here on them, great as
            > > they are, except when I sense that some new ground is being broken.
            > >
            > > Chris Norman is known to many who read and contribute to
            > > earlyflute, and indeed, frequent contributers like our colleague,
            > > Philippe Allain Dupré, and Rachel Brown, Marten Root, Janet See,
            > > Lisa Beznosuik, and others have performed with him, and taught at
            > > the Boxwood Music week in Nova Scotia. Furthermore, flute making
            > > colleagues like Philippe, Patrick Olwell, Ralph Sweetheart, and
            > > others have made some excellent flutes for Chris, so I think this
            > > might be worth posting, as my intention is to comment on the big
            > > picture.
            > >
            > > It was with anticipation and joy that I opened the padded envelope,
            > > and cast an eye over a New CD: "Let Me In This Ae Night"
            > > signaling a new breakthrough in drawing various genres of music
            > > onto one canvas. This is a duo recording with Chris N on various
            > > flutes and small pipes, together with David Greenberg on baroque
            > > violin and octave-low violin.
            > >
            > > Although I have been in the crowd at Boxwood some years ago, en
            > > passant, I have not yet had a chance to ceilidh with David in a
            > > quiet moment and I do look forward to that in the future, but in
            > > the meantime, with this duo CD, I did get a chance to hang out and
            > > drink in the combined sound of strings and wind, in a way that is
            > > particularly appealing to me, given my background as a Scot
            > > fireside singer, occasional fiddler, Cape Breton champion, and a
            > > mingler/ appreciator in the 18th century earlymusic movement.
            > > Having read something of David's career, I applaud any string
            > > player firing on all chakras from the solar plexus on up. I do wish
            > > more of us Scots could wield their instruments with the same
            > > passion, skill, style, and informed scholarship that he and Chris
            > > bring to bear, reminding us that the Scots/Cape Breton heritage
            > > shines brighter when delivered with masterful playing. In their
            > > direct juxtaposition with the 18th century continental art form,
            > > these two artists demonstrate that indeed it was only a very few
            > > short steps for Nathaniel Gow and others to move from the formal
            > > chamber music recital, to the dance floor and wild Strathspeys, in
            > > 18th century Edinburgh.
            > >
            > > I do not mean this brief email to be a full review of the new work,
            > > only to say that I am delighted to have it, and play it often. I
            > > have posted previously on the general subject of dance 'groove' and
            > > early music playing, so hold this in that context.
            > >
            > > More about the project at:
            > >
            > > http://www.boxwood.org/boxwood-media.html
            > >
            > > Meanwhile, I stepped out of my workshop on Saturday and walked down
            > > to the cliff edge to look out on a very rough Pacific Ocean at
            > > 1.30pm, the estimated time for the arrival here of the tsunami
            > > propagating out from the Chile earthquake at the speed of a jet
            > > plane. The waves were almost thirty feet high from a local storm,
            > > and I was not able to see any tsunami effect mixed in with the
            > > local weather. Later I learned that the expected strength of the
            > > wave did not materialize. However, better safe than sorry!
            > >
            > > best wishes!
            > >
            > > Rod
            > >
            > > rcameron@...
            > > PO Box 438
            > > 10580 Williams Street
            > > Mendocino,
            > > CA 95460, USA
            > > Home 707 937 9921
            > > Mobile: 707 813 7593 (best !)
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            > rcameron@...
            > PO Box 438
            > 10580 Williams Street
            > Mendocino,
            > CA 95460, USA
            > Home 707 937 9921
            > Mobile: 707 813 7593 (best !)
            >
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