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Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed

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  • Sandra Irlen
    Pamela, I am very familiar with Irlen Syndrome and can probably answer any questions that you might have. The Syndrome (in the most basic terms) describes a
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 1, 2002
      Pamela,

      I am very familiar with Irlen Syndrome and can probably answer any questions that you might have. The Syndrome (in the most basic terms) describes a subset of individuals who experience discomfort (such as eye strain, headaches, nausea, etc.) and/or distortions on the printed page (movement, blurring, swirling, etc.) that are often exaccerbated by bright and fluorescent lighting and visually intensive activites like reading. If you haven't already, you should visit the web site (www.irlen.com) to learn more and see if you think that the types of problems they describe there are the types of difficulties that your child is experiencing. Most often, individuals with the syndrome are able to identify themselves after reading or hearing a description of the types of problems that other sufferers have. Let me know if you have any specific questions that I can answer.

      Sandy

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Mandy Dodd
      To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, November 30, 2002 11:06 PM
      Subject: RE: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed


      >I am really new to all this. I don't know anything about dyslexia.
      I don't have any experience or knowledge that can help me to know
      what I can do to help her. I joined this group hoping to find some
      advice from others in a similar situation.
      Thanks for reading,
      Pamela>

      Have you looked up Irlen Syndrome?






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    • Mandy Dodd
      ... questions that you might have. Sandy Am I to understand looking at your name that you are related Sandy when speaking of Irlen Syndrome? I am having DD
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 1, 2002
        >I am very familiar with Irlen Syndrome and can probably answer any
        questions that you might have. >
        Sandy

        Am I to understand looking at your name that you are related Sandy when
        speaking of Irlen Syndrome?

        I am having DD tested next week. She has a history of autistic
        behaviors as a toddler (being glutenfree/caseinfree helped fix those)
        Started to read at 3.5yrs (wholeword) and was more advanced in reading
        than her peers, however this year (2nd year) as the type in the book has
        gotten smaller, she has slipped back, makes errors, skips words or lines
        and tires easily. I read up on Irlen Syndrome and it fit. I bought
        some blue cellophane to test out my suspicions and got immediate
        positive response. (Also found it in myself) My daughter and I both
        have Auditory Processing Disorder...she worse than me (Mine is only
        figure ground difficulties while she cannot 'hear' (as in process)
        phonics as well) therefore have researched and have found that auditory
        and vision processing difficulties can come 'hand in hand'. Both which
        need special considerations while attending in class.
        We have strategies in class for the auditory difficulties, therefore I
        am really hoping that the testing and hopefully glasses (of the correct
        colour she needs) will bring the answers to difficulties with vision.
        Underneath these difficulties is a very bright, creative, very visual
        spatial styled learner.
        Mandy
      • Moskowitz, Penny
        Mandy, I have a daughter that has been diagnosed as dyslexic and I am curious about the progress you have made with your daughter. My question to you is
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 1, 2002
          Mandy,
          I have a daughter that has been diagnosed as dyslexic and I am curious about
          the progress you have made with your daughter. My question to you is
          symptoms does being glutenfree/caseinfree help?

          My daughter has been given considerable phonetics training so she can read
          phonetically with a fairly extensive whole language. She too tires easily,
          skips words and makes errors, but I am told this is a lack of automaticity,
          and that she just needs to practice. (She used to skip lines and lose her
          place, but that was resolved with eye training. It seems both eyes could
          not converge well.) I have not considered the Irlen Syndrome yet, but
          maybe I should. I was told that everyone had a different color that helped
          and I am going to try blue cellophane and see if it makes a difference.

          Thanks
          Penny


          -----Original Message-----
          From: Mandy Dodd [mailto:MANDYDODD@...]
          Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2002 2:26 PM
          To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed



          >I am very familiar with Irlen Syndrome and can probably answer any
          questions that you might have. >
          Sandy

          Am I to understand looking at your name that you are related Sandy when
          speaking of Irlen Syndrome?

          I am having DD tested next week. She has a history of autistic
          behaviors as a toddler (being glutenfree/caseinfree helped fix those)
          Started to read at 3.5yrs (wholeword) and was more advanced in reading
          than her peers, however this year (2nd year) as the type in the book has
          gotten smaller, she has slipped back, makes errors, skips words or lines
          and tires easily. I read up on Irlen Syndrome and it fit. I bought
          some blue cellophane to test out my suspicions and got immediate
          positive response. (Also found it in myself) My daughter and I both
          have Auditory Processing Disorder...she worse than me (Mine is only
          figure ground difficulties while she cannot 'hear' (as in process)
          phonics as well) therefore have researched and have found that auditory
          and vision processing difficulties can come 'hand in hand'. Both which
          need special considerations while attending in class.
          We have strategies in class for the auditory difficulties, therefore I
          am really hoping that the testing and hopefully glasses (of the correct
          colour she needs) will bring the answers to difficulties with vision.
          Underneath these difficulties is a very bright, creative, very visual
          spatial styled learner.
          Mandy




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          dyslexiaclub-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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        • Mandy Dodd
          Hi Penny, ... about the progress you have made with your daughter. My question to you is symptoms does being glutenfree/caseinfree help? H presented as a
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 1, 2002
            Hi Penny,

            >I have a daughter that has been diagnosed as dyslexic and I am curious
            about
            the progress you have made with your daughter. My question to you is
            symptoms does being glutenfree/caseinfree help? >

            H presented as a toddler with very set ways, toe walked, flapped hands,
            tantrummed, but extremely forward......remembered anything she set her
            eyes on. When tested she was given the label PPDNOS, then Autism
            Spectrum, and at four yrs...Aspergers, which I would not accept. I
            researched and tried as I might to get her to fit...she did not.
            HOWEVER, on a special needs online list, there was much discussions
            about the gfcf diet which I mostly ignored...even thought they were
            grasping at straws! It got to me finally and I looked up the site (
            www.gfcfdiet.com ) click on 'The Big FAQs' and I tried it. I eliminated
            the dairy first for 5 weeks and within days her toe walking, hand
            flapping and tantrumming stopped, that gave us much encouragement to
            try the gluten. That took about 3 weeks for us to see that she
            responded more readily to conversations around us and her speech became
            clearer. It was an amazing transformation. Basically, she has 'leaky
            gut' with means that the casein (in dairy) and gluten don't digest
            properly, it then gets into the bloodstream which has an 'opium'
            drug-like affect. It was amazing. From there we could see where her
            difficulties lie. Definitely something was going on with her hearing,
            we weren't sure and an 'ordinary' test from the hearing loss clinic
            found that she had acute hearing. In fact right from being a tiny baby
            hated loud noises and would scream it we turned on the vacuum cleaner
            etc. So we had to look further, and found that it may be what happens
            to the sound AFTER it left the mechanical workings of the ear
            (processing) and after testing by a specialist audiologist with a
            battery of tests showed she and I had Auditory Processing Disorder (APD
            also known as CAPD where there are four models) Mine was processing
            sounds in the presence of background noise, H had this and was not able
            to hear phonics with soft sounding consonants and some blends.
            (frequency of sound)
            She was also dx as a gifted visual spatial learner. Then came
            increasing difficulty with reading with my last email stated and I
            found that Irlen syndrome has to do with the frequency of colour too and
            the to often co-exist. Therefore there were auditory and vision
            processing problems. I guessed with the colour of blue with the
            cellophone and only just have got some proper colour overlays to see how
            she and I felt. H felt very comfortable with green, whereas yellow
            relieved my eyes immediately. It's the stark white of the page the
            shines through the black type that's that problem. Whiteboards in
            school now are abominable for these children. H could never copy from
            it in class...there was another clue.

            So that's what our history to date...and a far cry from Aspergers for
            sure. Its been my ground work that has got us where she is today
            certainly not from professionals guiding us where we needed to go. They
            just don't expand their knowledge enough. I wonder how many children
            are mislabeled and missing out on important therapy/strategies??
            M
          • Sandra Irlen
            Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen s daughter. I am also an educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell University, and
            Message 5 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
              Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also an
              educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
              University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. I would be
              careful about making judgements as to whether color works simply by trying
              blue cellophane. Even though it worked for your daughter, as someone else
              mentioned, there are hundreds of possible color combinations, and the colors
              need to be very specific in order for them to work properly. As such, the
              wrong color can do more harm than good, and most certainly, blue does not
              work for everyone. However, it is possible to try a number of different
              colors to see if your child responds at all to color. Are there any other
              questions that I can answer for you?

              Sandy


              on 12/1/02 3:33 PM, Moskowitz, Penny at penny.moskowitz@... wrote:

              Mandy,
              I have a daughter that has been diagnosed as dyslexic and I am curious about
              the progress you have made with your daughter. My question to you is
              symptoms does being glutenfree/caseinfree help?

              My daughter has been given considerable phonetics training so she can read
              phonetically with a fairly extensive whole language. She too tires easily,
              skips words and makes errors, but I am told this is a lack of automaticity,
              and that she just needs to practice. (She used to skip lines and lose her
              place, but that was resolved with eye training. It seems both eyes could
              not converge well.) I have not considered the Irlen Syndrome yet, but
              maybe I should. I was told that everyone had a different color that helped
              and I am going to try blue cellophane and see if it makes a difference.

              Thanks
              Penny


              -----Original Message-----
              From: Mandy Dodd [mailto:MANDYDODD@...]
              Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2002 2:26 PM
              To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed



              >I am very familiar with Irlen Syndrome and can probably answer any
              questions that you might have. >
              Sandy

              Am I to understand looking at your name that you are related Sandy when
              speaking of Irlen Syndrome?

              I am having DD tested next week. She has a history of autistic
              behaviors as a toddler (being glutenfree/caseinfree helped fix those)
              Started to read at 3.5yrs (wholeword) and was more advanced in reading
              than her peers, however this year (2nd year) as the type in the book has
              gotten smaller, she has slipped back, makes errors, skips words or lines
              and tires easily. I read up on Irlen Syndrome and it fit. I bought
              some blue cellophane to test out my suspicions and got immediate
              positive response. (Also found it in myself) My daughter and I both
              have Auditory Processing Disorder...she worse than me (Mine is only
              figure ground difficulties while she cannot 'hear' (as in process)
              phonics as well) therefore have researched and have found that auditory
              and vision processing difficulties can come 'hand in hand'. Both which
              need special considerations while attending in class.
              We have strategies in class for the auditory difficulties, therefore I
              am really hoping that the testing and hopefully glasses (of the correct
              colour she needs) will bring the answers to difficulties with vision.
              Underneath these difficulties is a very bright, creative, very visual
              spatial styled learner.
              Mandy




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              dyslexiaclub-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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            • Moskowitz, Penny
              My thought is that its probably cumbersome to work with these foil overlays. How do you use them to write? Penny ... From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@ucla.edu]
              Message 6 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                My thought is that its probably cumbersome to work with these foil overlays.
                How do you use them to write?

                Penny


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                Sent: Monday, December 02, 2002 10:35 AM
                To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed


                Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also an
                educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
                University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. I would be
                careful about making judgements as to whether color works simply by trying
                blue cellophane. Even though it worked for your daughter, as someone else
                mentioned, there are hundreds of possible color combinations, and the colors
                need to be very specific in order for them to work properly. As such, the
                wrong color can do more harm than good, and most certainly, blue does not
                work for everyone. However, it is possible to try a number of different
                colors to see if your child responds at all to color. Are there any other
                questions that I can answer for you?

                Sandy


                on 12/1/02 3:33 PM, Moskowitz, Penny at penny.moskowitz@... wrote:

                Mandy,
                I have a daughter that has been diagnosed as dyslexic and I am curious about
                the progress you have made with your daughter. My question to you is
                symptoms does being glutenfree/caseinfree help?

                My daughter has been given considerable phonetics training so she can read
                phonetically with a fairly extensive whole language. She too tires easily,
                skips words and makes errors, but I am told this is a lack of automaticity,
                and that she just needs to practice. (She used to skip lines and lose her
                place, but that was resolved with eye training. It seems both eyes could
                not converge well.) I have not considered the Irlen Syndrome yet, but
                maybe I should. I was told that everyone had a different color that helped
                and I am going to try blue cellophane and see if it makes a difference.

                Thanks
                Penny


                -----Original Message-----
                From: Mandy Dodd [mailto:MANDYDODD@...]
                Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2002 2:26 PM
                To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed



                >I am very familiar with Irlen Syndrome and can probably answer any
                questions that you might have. >
                Sandy

                Am I to understand looking at your name that you are related Sandy when
                speaking of Irlen Syndrome?

                I am having DD tested next week. She has a history of autistic
                behaviors as a toddler (being glutenfree/caseinfree helped fix those)
                Started to read at 3.5yrs (wholeword) and was more advanced in reading
                than her peers, however this year (2nd year) as the type in the book has
                gotten smaller, she has slipped back, makes errors, skips words or lines
                and tires easily. I read up on Irlen Syndrome and it fit. I bought
                some blue cellophane to test out my suspicions and got immediate
                positive response. (Also found it in myself) My daughter and I both
                have Auditory Processing Disorder...she worse than me (Mine is only
                figure ground difficulties while she cannot 'hear' (as in process)
                phonics as well) therefore have researched and have found that auditory
                and vision processing difficulties can come 'hand in hand'. Both which
                need special considerations while attending in class.
                We have strategies in class for the auditory difficulties, therefore I
                am really hoping that the testing and hopefully glasses (of the correct
                colour she needs) will bring the answers to difficulties with vision.
                Underneath these difficulties is a very bright, creative, very visual
                spatial styled learner.
                Mandy




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                dyslexiaclub-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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              • Sandra Irlen
                Penny, The overlays are just the first (and cheapest) option. They are often used by school districts because they only cost a few dollars each. But, because
                Message 7 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                  Penny,

                  The overlays are just the first (and cheapest) option. They are often used
                  by school districts because they only cost a few dollars each. But, because
                  as you mentioned they are cumbersome, most individuals end up getting
                  glasses or contact lenses. As you may imagine, glasses provide benefit
                  throughout the day during all activities, not just reading. This means
                  reading, writing, driving, sports, working on computers, etc. And
                  particularly for the most severe clients, who are bothered by bright and
                  fluorescent lighting even when they are not doing any sort of visually
                  intensive activity, glasses or contact lenses help them function
                  successfully in those environments. The classroom is notorious for bright
                  fluorescent lighting, and many children not only have difficulty reading as
                  a result, but also have a host of physical symptoms such as headaches,
                  fatigue, etc. by the end of the school day. Glasses and contact lenses help
                  prevent those sorts of problems as well. They are regular reading glasses
                  that are tinted your child's proscribed color, as determined by an Irlen
                  diagnostician. It is also only in the glasses or contacts where it is
                  possible to get the hundreds of different color combinations and therefore
                  fine tune the right color for your child. The colored overlays only come in
                  8 colors and are mainly designed to help certified Irlen screeners determine
                  whether the client responds positively to color. Please be aware that the
                  color an individual may use in an overlay will never be the same color that
                  they will end up with in their glasses. This is due to the fact that the
                  overlays affect the contrast on the printed page, and the glasses do not.

                  Sandy


                  on 12/2/02 8:07 AM, Moskowitz, Penny at penny.moskowitz@... wrote:

                  My thought is that its probably cumbersome to work with these foil overlays.
                  How do you use them to write?

                  Penny


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                  Sent: Monday, December 02, 2002 10:35 AM
                  To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed


                  Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also an
                  educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
                  University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. I would be
                  careful about making judgements as to whether color works simply by trying
                  blue cellophane. Even though it worked for your daughter, as someone else
                  mentioned, there are hundreds of possible color combinations, and the colors
                  need to be very specific in order for them to work properly. As such, the
                  wrong color can do more harm than good, and most certainly, blue does not
                  work for everyone. However, it is possible to try a number of different
                  colors to see if your child responds at all to color. Are there any other
                  questions that I can answer for you?

                  Sandy


                  on 12/1/02 3:33 PM, Moskowitz, Penny at penny.moskowitz@... wrote:

                  Mandy,
                  I have a daughter that has been diagnosed as dyslexic and I am curious about
                  the progress you have made with your daughter. My question to you is
                  symptoms does being glutenfree/caseinfree help?

                  My daughter has been given considerable phonetics training so she can read
                  phonetically with a fairly extensive whole language. She too tires easily,
                  skips words and makes errors, but I am told this is a lack of automaticity,
                  and that she just needs to practice. (She used to skip lines and lose her
                  place, but that was resolved with eye training. It seems both eyes could
                  not converge well.) I have not considered the Irlen Syndrome yet, but
                  maybe I should. I was told that everyone had a different color that helped
                  and I am going to try blue cellophane and see if it makes a difference.

                  Thanks
                  Penny


                  -----Original Message-----
                  From: Mandy Dodd [mailto:MANDYDODD@...]
                  Sent: Sunday, December 01, 2002 2:26 PM
                  To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed



                  >I am very familiar with Irlen Syndrome and can probably answer any
                  questions that you might have. >
                  Sandy

                  Am I to understand looking at your name that you are related Sandy when
                  speaking of Irlen Syndrome?

                  I am having DD tested next week. She has a history of autistic
                  behaviors as a toddler (being glutenfree/caseinfree helped fix those)
                  Started to read at 3.5yrs (wholeword) and was more advanced in reading
                  than her peers, however this year (2nd year) as the type in the book has
                  gotten smaller, she has slipped back, makes errors, skips words or lines
                  and tires easily. I read up on Irlen Syndrome and it fit. I bought
                  some blue cellophane to test out my suspicions and got immediate
                  positive response. (Also found it in myself) My daughter and I both
                  have Auditory Processing Disorder...she worse than me (Mine is only
                  figure ground difficulties while she cannot 'hear' (as in process)
                  phonics as well) therefore have researched and have found that auditory
                  and vision processing difficulties can come 'hand in hand'. Both which
                  need special considerations while attending in class.
                  We have strategies in class for the auditory difficulties, therefore I
                  am really hoping that the testing and hopefully glasses (of the correct
                  colour she needs) will bring the answers to difficulties with vision.
                  Underneath these difficulties is a very bright, creative, very visual
                  spatial styled learner.
                  Mandy




                  To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                  dyslexiaclub-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Mandy Dodd
                  Hi Sandra, ... careful about making judgements as to whether color works simply by trying blue cellophane. I wouldn t exactly call it making a judgement on
                  Message 8 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                    Hi Sandra,

                    > I would be
                    careful about making judgements as to whether color works simply by
                    trying
                    blue cellophane.>

                    I wouldn't exactly call it making a judgement on what colour Sandra. How
                    would I go about finding if there was any truth almost immediately in my
                    new found knowledge that it 'could' be Irlen Syndrome at the time?
                    Initially guessing and buying blue cellophane was a guide as to find out
                    if there would be any difference in DD reading ability and to our
                    delight there was a big difference.

                    > Even though it worked for your daughter, as someone else
                    mentioned, there are hundreds of possible color combinations, and the
                    colors
                    need to be very specific in order for them to work properly. >

                    I am very well aware of that and wrote of my experience with my daughter
                    not suggesting that it was right for anyone elses. My daughter gets
                    tested at the Irlen Centre next week. So its not been hit and miss.


                    As such, the
                    wrong color can do more harm than good, and most certainly, blue does
                    not
                    work for everyone. However, it is possible to try a number of different
                    colors to see if your child responds at all to color.

                    Which is precisely what I wrote about in my email. After the cellophane
                    guess, I managed to get and use the correct overlays and found that
                    DD had felt comfortable with green, and me yellow. It will be
                    interesting to find out the results next Wednesday.

                    Are there any other
                    questions that I can answer for you?

                    Do you know if this disorder ever improves for the child? One concern
                    of mine is, do children get so 'used' to the glasses that they cant cope
                    without them when the glasses are taken off? I know I cant bear to be
                    without my sunglasses even on dull days.
                  • Sandra Irlen
                    Glad to hear that things are going well. I tried to be clear about the various colors and not just trying one color more for others (who may not have read
                    Message 9 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                      Glad to hear that things are going well. I tried to be clear about the
                      various colors and not just trying one color more for others (who may not
                      have read your email as carefully as I did) than for you. Sorry if it
                      sounded a bit redundant. Glad to hear that you will heading to an Irlen
                      Centre.

                      As for your question about whether children get so used to the glasses that
                      they can't function without them, I'd have to answer it this way. The
                      glasses do not cure your child's problem, so she/he will show symptoms again
                      if he/she takes off or stops using the glasses. Wearing the glasses
                      however, should not make your child any worse off without the glasses than
                      he/she is right now. Your child may however get so used to seeing things on
                      the page the way they are supposed to look, or feeling good in bright
                      lighting that he/she will be less inclined to put up with the distortions
                      and discomfort that may occur without the glasses.

                      Sandy

                      on 12/2/02 11:57 AM, Mandy Dodd at MANDYDODD@... wrote:

                      Hi Sandra,

                      > I would be
                      careful about making judgements as to whether color works simply by
                      trying
                      blue cellophane.>

                      I wouldn't exactly call it making a judgement on what colour Sandra. How
                      would I go about finding if there was any truth almost immediately in my
                      new found knowledge that it 'could' be Irlen Syndrome at the time?
                      Initially guessing and buying blue cellophane was a guide as to find out
                      if there would be any difference in DD reading ability and to our
                      delight there was a big difference.

                      > Even though it worked for your daughter, as someone else
                      mentioned, there are hundreds of possible color combinations, and the
                      colors
                      need to be very specific in order for them to work properly. >

                      I am very well aware of that and wrote of my experience with my daughter
                      not suggesting that it was right for anyone elses. My daughter gets
                      tested at the Irlen Centre next week. So its not been hit and miss.


                      As such, the
                      wrong color can do more harm than good, and most certainly, blue does
                      not
                      work for everyone. However, it is possible to try a number of different
                      colors to see if your child responds at all to color.

                      Which is precisely what I wrote about in my email. After the cellophane
                      guess, I managed to get and use the correct overlays and found that
                      DD had felt comfortable with green, and me yellow. It will be
                      interesting to find out the results next Wednesday.

                      Are there any other
                      questions that I can answer for you?

                      Do you know if this disorder ever improves for the child? One concern
                      of mine is, do children get so 'used' to the glasses that they cant cope
                      without them when the glasses are taken off? I know I cant bear to be
                      without my sunglasses even on dull days.




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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mandy Dodd
                      ... an educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. Sandra, can you
                      Message 10 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                        >Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also
                        an
                        educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
                        University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. >

                        Sandra, can you explain what the testing consists of, as I know my
                        daughter will be anxious? (It's a plane trip for us, and a holiday!) Do
                        you work in this area yourself?
                        Mandy
                      • Sandra Irlen
                        Mandy, The testing is 2 parts. First, is a screening (about 1 hour) where symptomology is identified, history is gathered, the severity of the disorder is
                        Message 11 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                          Mandy,

                          The testing is 2 parts. First, is a screening (about 1 hour) where
                          symptomology is identified, history is gathered, the severity of the
                          disorder is determined, and they decide whether it is worth your while to
                          continue on to the second part of the testing where they will determine the
                          appropriate color for your daughter. In this first part, the screener has
                          your child perform a number of simple visual activities designed to pull her
                          symptomology, so that they can get a good idea of the kinds of difficulties
                          your daughter experiences when reading and doing other related tasks. The
                          second part takes between 2 and 2 1/2 hours and is mainly focused on
                          determining the best color to eliminate discomfort and distortions. They'll
                          want to figure out something that works best for all situations and will
                          therefore have your child doing some reading, simple visual tasks, even
                          going outside. Tell your daughter not to worry. There is no such thing as
                          a right answer, and the goal of the whole thing is make her feel better and
                          see better. She should notice immediate differences, and it should be a fun
                          experience for you both. I'll be interested to hear how things go.

                          Sandy


                          on 12/2/02 12:20 PM, Mandy Dodd at MANDYDODD@... wrote:



                          >Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also
                          an
                          educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
                          University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. >

                          Sandra, can you explain what the testing consists of, as I know my
                          daughter will be anxious? (It's a plane trip for us, and a holiday!) Do
                          you work in this area yourself?
                          Mandy


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                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Mandy Dodd
                          Sandy, Thank-you so much for this comforting information. I will pass on to H the advice you have given. I am so looking forward to seeing how things work
                          Message 12 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                            Sandy,
                            Thank-you so much for this comforting information. I will pass on to H
                            the advice you have given. I am so looking forward to seeing how things
                            work out and if they do, then its going to solve the last remaining
                            unanswered difficulty in the classroom (to date) before moving up into
                            Third Year. We are being assessed at the Sydney Irlen Centre
                            (Australia). (Our school year is only a couple of weeks away from
                            ending) Therefore she will have plenty of opportunity to get used to new
                            glasses (assuming they are necessary) when school resumes in Feb. I
                            only wish that I had all this information so much earlier as not to see
                            her loose confidence in the one thing that she felt really strong
                            with.(reading) Hopefully this will be the answer to regaining that.
                            Irlen Syndrome (as with Auditory Processing Disorder) seem little known
                            about and unfortunately so many kids get to 'wear' other ill-fitting
                            labels unless a parent happens upon that 'special' professional or
                            information that can give more appropriate answers.
                            Thanks also for your answer to my question as to whether the children
                            get too used to wearing glasses. It makes sense explained that way.
                            H will be tested in Sydney on the 11th Dec, and we return home on the
                            17th, so I will certainly let you know how we go.
                            mandy

                            -----Original Message-----
                            From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                            Sent: Tuesday, 3 December 2002 7:36 AM
                            To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                            Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed

                            Mandy,

                            The testing is 2 parts. First, is a screening (about 1 hour) where
                            symptomology is identified, history is gathered, the severity of the
                            disorder is determined, and they decide whether it is worth your while
                            to
                            continue on to the second part of the testing where they will determine
                            the
                            appropriate color for your daughter. In this first part, the screener
                            has
                            your child perform a number of simple visual activities designed to pull
                            her
                            symptomology, so that they can get a good idea of the kinds of
                            difficulties
                            your daughter experiences when reading and doing other related tasks.
                            The
                            second part takes between 2 and 2 1/2 hours and is mainly focused on
                            determining the best color to eliminate discomfort and distortions.
                            They'll
                            want to figure out something that works best for all situations and will
                            therefore have your child doing some reading, simple visual tasks, even
                            going outside. Tell your daughter not to worry. There is no such thing
                            as
                            a right answer, and the goal of the whole thing is make her feel better
                            and
                            see better. She should notice immediate differences, and it should be a
                            fun
                            experience for you both. I'll be interested to hear how things go.

                            Sandy


                            on 12/2/02 12:20 PM, Mandy Dodd at MANDYDODD@... wrote:



                            >Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also
                            an
                            educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
                            University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. >

                            Sandra, can you explain what the testing consists of, as I know my
                            daughter will be anxious? (It's a plane trip for us, and a holiday!) Do
                            you work in this area yourself?
                            Mandy


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                          • Sandra Irlen
                            Best of luck, Mandy. Enjoy your trip. And do let me know how things work out. I m glad that I could help. Sandy on 12/2/02 3:27 PM, Mandy Dodd at
                            Message 13 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                              Best of luck, Mandy. Enjoy your trip. And do let me know how things work
                              out. I'm glad that I could help.

                              Sandy


                              on 12/2/02 3:27 PM, Mandy Dodd at MANDYDODD@... wrote:

                              Sandy,
                              Thank-you so much for this comforting information. I will pass on to H
                              the advice you have given. I am so looking forward to seeing how things
                              work out and if they do, then its going to solve the last remaining
                              unanswered difficulty in the classroom (to date) before moving up into
                              Third Year. We are being assessed at the Sydney Irlen Centre
                              (Australia). (Our school year is only a couple of weeks away from
                              ending) Therefore she will have plenty of opportunity to get used to new
                              glasses (assuming they are necessary) when school resumes in Feb. I
                              only wish that I had all this information so much earlier as not to see
                              her loose confidence in the one thing that she felt really strong
                              with.(reading) Hopefully this will be the answer to regaining that.
                              Irlen Syndrome (as with Auditory Processing Disorder) seem little known
                              about and unfortunately so many kids get to 'wear' other ill-fitting
                              labels unless a parent happens upon that 'special' professional or
                              information that can give more appropriate answers.
                              Thanks also for your answer to my question as to whether the children
                              get too used to wearing glasses. It makes sense explained that way.
                              H will be tested in Sydney on the 11th Dec, and we return home on the
                              17th, so I will certainly let you know how we go.
                              mandy

                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                              Sent: Tuesday, 3 December 2002 7:36 AM
                              To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed

                              Mandy,

                              The testing is 2 parts. First, is a screening (about 1 hour) where
                              symptomology is identified, history is gathered, the severity of the
                              disorder is determined, and they decide whether it is worth your while
                              to
                              continue on to the second part of the testing where they will determine
                              the
                              appropriate color for your daughter. In this first part, the screener
                              has
                              your child perform a number of simple visual activities designed to pull
                              her
                              symptomology, so that they can get a good idea of the kinds of
                              difficulties
                              your daughter experiences when reading and doing other related tasks.
                              The
                              second part takes between 2 and 2 1/2 hours and is mainly focused on
                              determining the best color to eliminate discomfort and distortions.
                              They'll
                              want to figure out something that works best for all situations and will
                              therefore have your child doing some reading, simple visual tasks, even
                              going outside. Tell your daughter not to worry. There is no such thing
                              as
                              a right answer, and the goal of the whole thing is make her feel better
                              and
                              see better. She should notice immediate differences, and it should be a
                              fun
                              experience for you both. I'll be interested to hear how things go.

                              Sandy


                              on 12/2/02 12:20 PM, Mandy Dodd at MANDYDODD@... wrote:



                              >Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also
                              an
                              educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
                              University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. >

                              Sandra, can you explain what the testing consists of, as I know my
                              daughter will be anxious? (It's a plane trip for us, and a holiday!) Do
                              you work in this area yourself?
                              Mandy


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                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • Denny Smith
                              Group I have trouble with our and or and has and as I still get them confused. Still drives me nuts Den Mandy Dodd wrote:Sandy,
                              Message 14 of 20 , Dec 2, 2002
                                Group
                                I have trouble with our and or and has and as I still get them confused. Still drives me nuts

                                Den
                                Mandy Dodd <MANDYDODD@...> wrote:Sandy,
                                Thank-you so much for this comforting information. I will pass on to H
                                the advice you have given. I am so looking forward to seeing how things
                                work out and if they do, then its going to solve the last remaining
                                unanswered difficulty in the classroom (to date) before moving up into
                                Third Year. We are being assessed at the Sydney Irlen Centre
                                (Australia). (Our school year is only a couple of weeks away from
                                ending) Therefore she will have plenty of opportunity to get used to new
                                glasses (assuming they are necessary) when school resumes in Feb. I
                                only wish that I had all this information so much earlier as not to see
                                her loose confidence in the one thing that she felt really strong
                                with.(reading) Hopefully this will be the answer to regaining that.
                                Irlen Syndrome (as with Auditory Processing Disorder) seem little known
                                about and unfortunately so many kids get to 'wear' other ill-fitting
                                labels unless a parent happens upon that 'special' professional or
                                information that can give more appropriate answers.
                                Thanks also for your answer to my question as to whether the children
                                get too used to wearing glasses. It makes sense explained that way.
                                H will be tested in Sydney on the 11th Dec, and we return home on the
                                17th, so I will certainly let you know how we go.
                                mandy

                                -----Original Message-----
                                From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                                Sent: Tuesday, 3 December 2002 7:36 AM
                                To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                                Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed

                                Mandy,

                                The testing is 2 parts. First, is a screening (about 1 hour) where
                                symptomology is identified, history is gathered, the severity of the
                                disorder is determined, and they decide whether it is worth your while
                                to
                                continue on to the second part of the testing where they will determine
                                the
                                appropriate color for your daughter. In this first part, the screener
                                has
                                your child perform a number of simple visual activities designed to pull
                                her
                                symptomology, so that they can get a good idea of the kinds of
                                difficulties
                                your daughter experiences when reading and doing other related tasks.
                                The
                                second part takes between 2 and 2 1/2 hours and is mainly focused on
                                determining the best color to eliminate discomfort and distortions.
                                They'll
                                want to figure out something that works best for all situations and will
                                therefore have your child doing some reading, simple visual tasks, even
                                going outside. Tell your daughter not to worry. There is no such thing
                                as
                                a right answer, and the goal of the whole thing is make her feel better
                                and
                                see better. She should notice immediate differences, and it should be a
                                fun
                                experience for you both. I'll be interested to hear how things go.

                                Sandy


                                on 12/2/02 12:20 PM, Mandy Dodd at MANDYDODD@... wrote:



                                >Yes, actually, I am related. I am Helen Irlen's daughter. I am also
                                an
                                educational psychologist with a B.S. in child development from Cornell
                                University, and a Ph.D. in Educational Psychology from UCLA. >

                                Sandra, can you explain what the testing consists of, as I know my
                                daughter will be anxious? (It's a plane trip for us, and a holiday!) Do
                                you work in this area yourself?
                                Mandy


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                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Mandy Dodd
                                Hi Sandy, Sorry its taken so long to get back to you. Its been mad here Christmassing and all, especially after being away. H has indeed got Irlen Syndrome
                                Message 15 of 20 , Dec 23, 2002
                                  Hi Sandy,
                                  Sorry its taken so long to get back to you. Its been mad here
                                  Christmassing and all, especially after being away.
                                  H has indeed got Irlen Syndrome and its quite profound. It seems that
                                  she sees 'rivers' DOWN the page, so the words actually fall in columns
                                  downwards. The testing was comprehensive and the tester was a lovely
                                  woman with whom H had instant rapport (which isn't always easy) One
                                  thing H did have problems with was trying to explain or find the words
                                  for what she was seeing. However, she did get there. I was amazed at
                                  the testing procedure and how the findings were produced. The
                                  difference between no tint in front of H's eyes to the tints was
                                  profound. I was flabberghasted.
                                  The picture with all the X's on it....Hannah could not see the picture
                                  at all, just the black X's with white splotches shining through, yet at
                                  the end with the correct tints she was able to instantly see what the
                                  picture was! Everything that the assessor asked her to try had big
                                  effect. There was no doubt. Also the lift of H's own spirit as she
                                  could see effectively was heartening and a small insight to how moving
                                  into third yr at school (in feb) with this uplift can make a huge
                                  difference in regaining lost confidence.
                                  H ended up with a mid-shade of green. We look very forward to her
                                  getting her glasses.
                                  Thank-you so much for your advice. It has rang very true.
                                  I could send you her report privately if you are interested....just let
                                  me know
                                  Mandy

                                  -----Original Message-----
                                  From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                                  Sent: Tuesday, 3 December 2002 7:36 AM
                                  To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                                  Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed

                                  Mandy,

                                  The testing is 2 parts. First, is a screening (about 1 hour) where
                                  symptomology is identified, history is gathered, the severity of the
                                  disorder is determined, and they decide whether it is worth your while
                                  to
                                  continue on to the second part of the testing where they will determine
                                  the
                                  appropriate color for your daughter. In this first part, the screener
                                  has
                                  your child perform a number of simple visual activities designed to pull
                                  her
                                  symptomology, so that they can get a good idea of the kinds of
                                  difficulties
                                  your daughter experiences when reading and doing other related tasks.
                                  The
                                  second part takes between 2 and 2 1/2 hours and is mainly focused on
                                  determining the best color to eliminate discomfort and distortions.
                                  They'll
                                  want to figure out something that works best for all situations and will
                                  therefore have your child doing some reading, simple visual tasks, even
                                  going outside. Tell your daughter not to worry. There is no such thing
                                  as
                                  a right answer, and the goal of the whole thing is make her feel better
                                  and
                                  see better. She should notice immediate differences, and it should be a
                                  fun
                                  experience for you both. I'll be interested to hear how things go.

                                  Sandy
                                • Sandra Irlen
                                  Mandy, I m glad that your experience was a positive one. A large part of what they do during the whole testing process is create awareness of exactly what is
                                  Message 16 of 20 , Dec 30, 2002
                                    Mandy,
                                    I'm glad that your experience was a positive one. A large part of what they do during the whole testing process is create awareness of exactly what is going on. As you mentioned, most people have no idea that what they see (or what their loved ones see) on the page isn't normal. At any rate, I hope that your daughter enjoys her lenses and continues to make progress! I believe that your tester should contact you a few weeks after your daughter receives her lenses to follow up. Be aware that often what seems great in the testing room can in fact be made even better after the fact, since the system will settle down a bit with the new lenses. Be sure to let your tester know if your daughter is still experiencing any distortions or discomforts because once things settle down a bit they often can be fine tuned to make them even better.

                                    All the best,
                                    Sandy
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Mandy Dodd
                                    To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                                    Sent: Monday, December 23, 2002 1:17 PM
                                    Subject: RE: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed


                                    Hi Sandy,
                                    Sorry its taken so long to get back to you. Its been mad here
                                    Christmassing and all, especially after being away.
                                    H has indeed got Irlen Syndrome and its quite profound. It seems that
                                    she sees 'rivers' DOWN the page, so the words actually fall in columns
                                    downwards. The testing was comprehensive and the tester was a lovely
                                    woman with whom H had instant rapport (which isn't always easy) One
                                    thing H did have problems with was trying to explain or find the words
                                    for what she was seeing. However, she did get there. I was amazed at
                                    the testing procedure and how the findings were produced. The
                                    difference between no tint in front of H's eyes to the tints was
                                    profound. I was flabberghasted.
                                    The picture with all the X's on it....Hannah could not see the picture
                                    at all, just the black X's with white splotches shining through, yet at
                                    the end with the correct tints she was able to instantly see what the
                                    picture was! Everything that the assessor asked her to try had big
                                    effect. There was no doubt. Also the lift of H's own spirit as she
                                    could see effectively was heartening and a small insight to how moving
                                    into third yr at school (in feb) with this uplift can make a huge
                                    difference in regaining lost confidence.
                                    H ended up with a mid-shade of green. We look very forward to her
                                    getting her glasses.
                                    Thank-you so much for your advice. It has rang very true.
                                    I could send you her report privately if you are interested....just let
                                    me know
                                    Mandy

                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                                    Sent: Tuesday, 3 December 2002 7:36 AM
                                    To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed

                                    Mandy,

                                    The testing is 2 parts. First, is a screening (about 1 hour) where
                                    symptomology is identified, history is gathered, the severity of the
                                    disorder is determined, and they decide whether it is worth your while
                                    to
                                    continue on to the second part of the testing where they will determine
                                    the
                                    appropriate color for your daughter. In this first part, the screener
                                    has
                                    your child perform a number of simple visual activities designed to pull
                                    her
                                    symptomology, so that they can get a good idea of the kinds of
                                    difficulties
                                    your daughter experiences when reading and doing other related tasks.
                                    The
                                    second part takes between 2 and 2 1/2 hours and is mainly focused on
                                    determining the best color to eliminate discomfort and distortions.
                                    They'll
                                    want to figure out something that works best for all situations and will
                                    therefore have your child doing some reading, simple visual tasks, even
                                    going outside. Tell your daughter not to worry. There is no such thing
                                    as
                                    a right answer, and the goal of the whole thing is make her feel better
                                    and
                                    see better. She should notice immediate differences, and it should be a
                                    fun
                                    experience for you both. I'll be interested to hear how things go.

                                    Sandy





                                    To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
                                    dyslexiaclub-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com



                                    Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • Mandy Dodd
                                    Thanks Sandy for your reply and sorry its taken a while, we have been away holidaying again. I was hoping the lenses would have been here now but I think
                                    Message 17 of 20 , Jan 9 12:50 PM
                                      Thanks Sandy for your reply and sorry its taken a while, we have been
                                      away holidaying again. I was hoping the lenses would have been here now
                                      but I think perhaps Xmas in between may have delayed that a little.
                                      I will certainly let you know about H's progress with them.
                                      I think one of the astounding things in the testing was the fact that
                                      once the correct shade of the green was found that she saw the
                                      background of eyechart (which was white) as white! When I looked
                                      through the lenses...it looked green! I marvel at how H has actually
                                      managed to date with this difficulty and look back with hindsight and
                                      shudder!
                                      I just wish it was much better known, but I think the word is getting
                                      out there. Interestingly, the tester had 'lenses' as well! That was
                                      heartening as I found she could speak from experience!
                                      Mandy


                                      -----Original Message-----
                                      From: Sandra Irlen [mailto:irlen@...]
                                      Sent: Tuesday, 31 December 2002 5:20 AM
                                      To: dyslexiaclub@yahoogroups.com
                                      Subject: Re: [Dyslexia Club] newly diagnosed

                                      Mandy,
                                      I'm glad that your experience was a positive one. A large part of what
                                      they do during the whole testing process is create awareness of exactly
                                      what is going on. As you mentioned, most people have no idea that what
                                      they see (or what their loved ones see) on the page isn't normal. At
                                      any rate, I hope that your daughter enjoys her lenses and continues to
                                      make progress! I believe that your tester should contact you a few
                                      weeks after your daughter receives her lenses to follow up. Be aware
                                      that often what seems great in the testing room can in fact be made even
                                      better after the fact, since the system will settle down a bit with the
                                      new lenses. Be sure to let your tester know if your daughter is still
                                      experiencing any distortions or discomforts because once things settle
                                      down a bit they often can be fine tuned to make them even better.

                                      All the best,
                                      Sandy
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