Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: back to roots

Expand Messages
  • kevandavis
    ... for ... I don t know, the themeless decks work best when they re being played simultaneously - maybe we d be better off trying to establish some protocols
    Message 1 of 8 , May 1, 2002
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      >I was thinking... might it be of interest to anyone to do a themeless
      >"ur-dvorak" deck, just by suggesting cards to the list one at a time
      for
      >approval/repeal or modification..?

      I don't know, the themeless decks work best when they're being
      played simultaneously - maybe we'd be better off trying to
      establish some protocols for (private or other-list) email
      play. The only real stumbling blocks are keeping draw-pile and
      hand contents a secret, but we could always try a game where
      the draw pile and players' hands are visible to everyone, at
      all times.

      By their nature, Nomic games evolve to fit whatever environment
      you give them - it might be worth a try. Propose cards on a
      round-robin basis; if nobody's objected to a card you proposed
      during your last turn, it's considered approved.

      >I'm kinda bummed nobody even said anything about the other two ideas
      I
      >mentioned.. I know they're pretty involved, and I didn't expect
      people
      >to launch on them, but a comment or two would have been nice.

      Their being 'involved' was the thing - I wanted to read through
      them properly before opening my mouth. It's been a busy week.

      Kevan
    • wyngfethyr@aol.com
      Hmm.. good thoughts. I agree that such games evolve better when played simultaneously... but I never have time to play, and besides, sometimes I only come up
      Message 2 of 8 , May 1, 2002
      View Source
      • 0 Attachment

        Hmm.. good thoughts.  I agree that such games evolve better when played simultaneously... but I never have time to play, and besides, sometimes I only come up with one good idea at a time =>  (blatant playing off of handicaps.. heh heh)

        I'm willing to try it.

        And you're right about taking time to read those two monsters.. I apologize for getting whiny so soon.  It's been a long week for me too. 

        My ribs are still sore from that flail shot to the chest on the battlefield today... but at least we weren't rained out..

          I have been jotting down notes on another interesting idea.. I came up with it when I tried to come up with a "random theme" to build a themeless deck around (don't try to analyze the logic, it's just not there).  The first thing that came to my head was "Plombkin's Quest for the Snerb".    Wuzzat mean?  I dunno. 

        But as the week wore on, I learned more about Plombkin, a stubby little person with a cheerfully annoying habit of having an 'saying' for every occasion.  Ones that always start with "My Aunt Frumble always said..." or "My Gramdpa Whister always says...".  I don't know why, when my brain wanders I don't ask where it's been.

        Anyway, apparently Plombkin at some point for some reason, decides that he/she (gender depends on who's playing) needs a Snerb to be complete.  So they set out to obtain one and bring it back their Hovel, where they shall live happily (ans snerbily) ever after.  What's a Snerb?  I dunno.  I do know there are more than one, and more than one kind.  Which kind does Plombkin want?  I don't know that either.  I think any of them might do, under the right circumstances.

        So, Plombkin sets out looking for a Snerb.  They go various Places, and encounter various people, some who Help and some who Hinder.   They may run across various other treasures that they may choose to carry for whatever reason.  And things happen, good things, bad things, etc.  Eventually, Plombkin finds a suitable Snerb and brings it home.  Or, perhaps they don't.

        Confused?  Me too.  But here's how it's gradually becoming clear to me.  The point of the game (which is a 2 player game) is to tell a story, the story of Plombkin's Quest for the Snerb, appropriately enough.  One player's job is to Help Plombkin's quest, the other's is to Hinder it.

        Some of what I've figured out so far...

        To start the game, the Helping Player begins with Plombkin (the main Character <thing>) already in play under their control.  Also, they start with Plombkin's Hovel (a Place <thing>) in their control, which has an Action like "Draw 5 Cards and then Discard down to 5." and "Plombkin's Hovel may not be in play more than one round" or something, to prevent the player from camping out there and drawing all day. 

        Meanwhile, the Hindering Player starts with no cards in play, and 5 in hand- but has a hand limit of 8, as opposed to the Helping player's limit of 5.  Thus at any given time they may have more options.

        Special Rule: Places: When you play a new Place under your control, you must discard the existing Place.  (represents moving around the land)

        Okay, so, the Helping player goes first, starting the Quest.  They may play a Place (travel), or a Character (an Ally, in this case), or a Treasure.  There are also Action cards (Events).

        Special Rule: Treasures: Treasures represent items that are generally going to be equipped or worn by Characters.  They always go into play as "attachments" to a Character.  Characters may "carry" only one Treasure at a time unless a card states otherwise.

        The Hindering player may play any of those on their turn as well. 

        The players may play 1 Thing (either a Place, Character, or Treasure) on their turn, and one Action PER CHARACTER THEY CONTROL AT THE START OF THEIR TURN.  Actions may be Events (Action cards) or Place effects, or Treasure actions, or Character abilities.  However the Hindering player may play one Event action even if they have no Characters in play, because they represent the forces of fate aligned against poor Plombkin.

        Oh, and did I mention that there are 2 copies of each Place in the deck, and that when both players are 'at' the same Place, their characters Encounter each other and can interact directly (fight, argue, trade Treasures, play Kvorad (the favored card game in Plomb's world =>) or whatever).

        Obviously, different characters are going to come into play on different sides each game.  Which is fine.  There are no "good" or "evil" characters.  Merely those that Help (Allies) and those that Hinder (Adversaries).  Why do they do what they do?  That's the point- the story will be different each time, and it's up to the players to tell it.

        SPECIAL RULE: THE STORY: When the Helping player begins the game, they begin a story, starting with Plombkin deciding to find a Snerb.  In order for either player to play a card, of any kind,  the playr must tell the next bit of story that describes how that card affects Plombkin's Quest.

        So, it's like this:

        {Hlp}: "Plombkin is sitting in (his) Hovel one day, drinking pink lemonade and watching Sanford and Son reruns, when he sees an ad on TV for "the Wanktastic Snerb!" only $99.95 at any Freem Brothers outlet store. "

        [turn 1] {HLP}:
        <uses Plombkin's action to trigger the special effect of Plombkin's Hovel, drawing 5 cards>
        "So, Plombkin gets up out of his easy chair and rummages in the closet for some gear, and sets out to find his very own Snerb..."
        <plays the Tennis Racket treasure onto Plomb>
        "...equipped with his trusty Tennis Racket, which had never let him down before."

        [turn 2] {Hnd}:
        <draws a card, bringing hand to 6>
        <plays the action (Event) card Absent Minded, forcing the Tennis Racket back into the Helping player's hand>
        "But as Plombkin readied for his trip, he couldn't help feeling as though he'd forgotten something.."
        <plays the character card Thorcas the Seer>
        "Meanwhile, in another part of the land, Thorcas the Seer was pondering the navel of the universe, when a vision suddenly came to him that if a man named Plombkin ever got ahold of a Snerb, it would signal the imminence of eschaton.  Immediately he knew he must do anything in his power to prevent this awful occurence."

        [turn 3] {HLP}:
        <draws a card, and discards one, keeping hand at 5>
        <plays the Clean Pair of Socks treasure onto Plombkin>
        "Plombkin couldn't remember that he'd left his trust Tennis Racket on the counter, but he did remember to put on clean socks, after all, his Mother Gertrude always said "Always wear a clean pair of socks, my son.. it wouldn't do to be caught dead in a fishtank."
        <draws a card, and discards one, keeping hand at 5>
        <plays the Pig & Swill Tavern place card, 'destroying' the Hovel.>
        "Plombkin set out, deciding to stop by the pub for a pint and to say hi to the fellows.  He told his friends of his quest and they raised a cheer for him, wishing him good fortune."
        <uses Plomb's action to trigger the Pig & Swill's special effect: "Three Cheers", allowing him to draw three cards, then discard down to 4>

        [oh did I mention the Special Rule: Sayings:  Whenever the Helping player makes up a 'wise' saying by someone Plombkin's associated with, they get to draw a card.  Maximum one per turn.  Only catch is- each saying must be by a different person, and never by Plombkin his/herself.  If a person is repeated, it doesn't count.  And if it's clear you didn't try to come up with something good, the Hindering player can deny you.]

        Anyway, that's the basics of it.  Also, I was considering  mechanic by which the numbering of the cards could be used instead of dice or whatever to resolve contested actions, in the following manner:

        Plombkin offers to Arm Wrestle with Nummintz the Bouncer (controlled by the Hindering player).  Each of them draws a card from the deck, initiating player first, and compare numbers.  The one with the higher number wins.

        This concept could be used in many games, so feel free to borrow it, if someone else hadn't already thought of it.  It's a potentially useful mechanic, depending on how you implement it.

        The point of Plombkin's Quest for the Snerb, again, is to tell a story together with the other player.  The characters may come into play as Allies or Adversaries, events may be played by either side, with the timing of them being what makes them Helpful or Hindering... the Hindering player will have to be shrewd to try to plan their moves to thwart the quest.

        Obviously the Helping player's victory condition is to get a Snerb under Plombkin's control and return to the Hovel with it.  The Hindering player's victory condition is... hmm.. I'm not sure yet.

        But I was also thinking that each character might have their own goals in life, sort of 'side quests' that might yield special bonuses when completed.  Such as Thorcas' lifelong dream to settle down and get married.  Maybe giving the Love Philtre to a female character to make her fall in love with him will please him so much he'll give you free palm readings for life, or whatever.

        I know, I know.. it's the third long ass intricate idea I've plastered the list with.. I can't help it, it's my curse.

        I welcome any comments, (even if their negative), and I'll be patient this time, I swear =>

        Nev the Hypochondriac Weasel Feed Morpher
      • David Turner
        On Wed, 2002-05-01 at 21:53, wyngfethyr@aol.com wrote: ... I occasionally play a similar game called _Once Upon A Time_. (review with good description:
        Message 3 of 8 , May 2, 2002
        View Source
        • 0 Attachment
          On Wed, 2002-05-01 at 21:53, wyngfethyr@... wrote:
          <snip>
          > Confused? Me too. But here's how it's gradually becoming clear to me. The
          > point of the game (which is a 2 player game) is to tell a story, the story of
          > Plombkin's Quest for the Snerb, appropriately enough. One player's job is to
          > Help Plombkin's quest, the other's is to Hinder it.

          I occasionally play a similar game called _Once Upon A Time_. (review
          with good description:
          http://www.gamereport.com/tgr6/onceuponatime.html)

          When I want to play with my friends and we don't have a deck handy, we
          just make one up on index cards.


          --
          -Dave Turner Stalk Me: 617 441 0668
          "Unless his dogs were cloned/implanted/digitized/running Linux/
          playing mp3's/putting spyware in Kazaa.. I DON'T GIVE A SHIT!"
          -btellier (seen on Slashdot)
        • wyngfethyr@aol.com
          I ll check it out, thanks. I take it that means you don t think it s a totally lame idea? NtD
          Message 4 of 8 , May 2, 2002
          View Source
          • 0 Attachment
            <reply to the OUAT note>

            I'll check it out, thanks.  I take it that means you don't think it's a totally lame idea?

            NtD
          • wyngfethyr@aol.com
            I looked at it... looks fun, actually. I had heard of this one before but never seen a review. Not exactly the same
            Message 5 of 8 , May 2, 2002
            View Source
            • 0 Attachment

              <also in response to the OUaT note>

              I looked at it... looks fun, actually.  I had heard of this one before but never seen a review.  Not exactly the same thing, but bearing several similarities.

              I'd feel worse about the "character/Place/Thing/Event" overlap, if that weren't the standard for pretty much any CCG type game out there.  I mean, really, what else are you gonna do?

              I wouldn't mind playing OUaT, and if I run across it somewhere I'll probably pick it up.  I always like to try new games, and party games are among my favorites.

              Thanks for the comment.. I'd be interested to hear if you had any others =>

              NtD
            • wyngfethyr@aol.com
              Well.. familiar as any characters I pulled out of my ear at 4am anyway =
              Message 6 of 8 , May 2, 2002
              View Source
              • 0 Attachment

                Well.. familiar as any characters I pulled out of my ear at 4am anyway =>

              • David Turner
                Yeah, OUaT is a lot of fun. And I do like your idea -- it would be fun for the same reason fanfiction is fun -- getting to do new things with familiar
                Message 7 of 8 , May 2, 2002
                View Source
                • 0 Attachment
                  Yeah, OUaT is a lot of fun. And I do like your idea -- it would be fun
                  for the same reason fanfiction is fun -- getting to do new things with
                  familiar characters.

                  On Thu, 2002-05-02 at 16:51, wyngfethyr@... wrote:
                  >
                  > <also in response to the OUaT note>
                  >
                  > I looked at it... looks fun, actually. I had heard of this one before but
                  > never seen a review. Not exactly the same thing, but bearing several
                  > similarities.
                  >
                  > I'd feel worse about the "character/Place/Thing/Event" overlap, if that
                  > weren't the standard for pretty much any CCG type game out there. I mean,
                  > really, what else are you gonna do?
                  >
                  > I wouldn't mind playing OUaT, and if I run across it somewhere I'll probably
                  > pick it up. I always like to try new games, and party games are among my
                  > favorites.
                  >
                  > Thanks for the comment.. I'd be interested to hear if you had any others =>
                  >
                  > NtD
                  >
                  --
                  -Dave Turner Stalk Me: 617 441 0668
                  "Unless his dogs were cloned/implanted/digitized/running Linux/
                  playing mp3's/putting spyware in Kazaa.. I DON'T GIVE A SHIT!"
                  -btellier (seen on Slashdot)
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.