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Re: Advice Please

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  • brad_g8
    Your oven won t crack. Just think of all the pioneers using cast iron while traveling through the mountains in the middle of winter. Zero degree nights were
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 8, 2013
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      Your oven won't crack. Just think of all the pioneers using cast iron while traveling through the mountains in the middle of winter. Zero degree nights were common and their ovens didn't crack on the breakfast fires.

      Cast iron is a wonderful substance with excellent ductile properties. It has the ability to move from very cold to very hot with ease, unless a flaw exists in the iron from the foundry. If you've used your oven many times and it hasn't cracked yet, it won't crack moving from 35 degrees to 350 any more than 68 degrees to 350. While the 33 degrees difference between 35 and 68 seems a lot, the iron takes it in stride.

      Have faith in this wonderful cooking implement! Just because we are cold doesn't mean the iron cares!!!

      My favorite way to clean is to deglaze, meaning I take a smoking hot pan (400 plus degrees) and dump an ounce or two of cool water in (no ice, just out of the tap). Then mop it off with a paper towel. The sudden temperature change is much more sudden than refrigerator to 350 on coals, and the iron seems to thrive on the treatment. Never a crack! Even the seasoning gets better over time with this method.

      Apologies for what may seem a soapbox moment, but we seem to underestimate the flexibility of the iron, and therefore, never explore what it can really do.

      It's probably safer for the glass shelves in your refrigerator to use baggies and assemble just before cooking, but as for the iron, it doesn't care.

      Brad G

      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "tucsonbill@..." <bill@...> wrote:
      >
      > I have several recipes, casserole type, that wold be perfect for DO cooking except for one small problem. They require preparation and then overnight refrigeration. Then you are supposed to take the DO out of the fridge and cook it at 350 degrees. I am sure that the neighbors would be able to hear the DO crack! How do I handle this?
      >
      > Thanks,
      > TucsonBill
      >
    • tucsonbill@ymail.com
      Thanks Brad! Guess I never thought of it that way. Will have to give that some thought. I have to admit, it does sound right. Bill
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 8, 2013
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        Thanks Brad! Guess I never thought of it that way. Will have to give that some thought. I have to admit, it does sound right.

        Bill


        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, brad_g8 <no_reply@...> wrote:
        >
        > Your oven won't crack. Just think of all the pioneers using cast iron while traveling through the mountains in the middle of winter. Zero degree nights were common and their ovens didn't crack on the breakfast fires.
        >
        > Cast iron is a wonderful substance with excellent ductile properties. It has the ability to move from very cold to very hot with ease, unless a flaw exists in the iron from the foundry. If you've used your oven many times and it hasn't cracked yet, it won't crack moving from 35 degrees to 350 any more than 68 degrees to 350. While the 33 degrees difference between 35 and 68 seems a lot, the iron takes it in stride.
        >
        > Have faith in this wonderful cooking implement! Just because we are cold doesn't mean the iron cares!!!
        >
        > My favorite way to clean is to deglaze, meaning I take a smoking hot pan (400 plus degrees) and dump an ounce or two of cool water in (no ice, just out of the tap). Then mop it off with a paper towel. The sudden temperature change is much more sudden than refrigerator to 350 on coals, and the iron seems to thrive on the treatment. Never a crack! Even the seasoning gets better over time with this method.
        >
        > Apologies for what may seem a soapbox moment, but we seem to underestimate the flexibility of the iron, and therefore, never explore what it can really do.
        >
        > It's probably safer for the glass shelves in your refrigerator to use baggies and assemble just before cooking, but as for the iron, it doesn't care.
        >
        > Brad G
        >
        > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "tucsonbill@" <bill@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I have several recipes, casserole type, that wold be perfect for DO cooking except for one small problem. They require preparation and then overnight refrigeration. Then you are supposed to take the DO out of the fridge and cook it at 350 degrees. I am sure that the neighbors would be able to hear the DO crack! How do I handle this?
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > > TucsonBill
        > >
        >
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