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Re: How many of you cook over campfires?

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  • rlb_51
    I ve heard of other campgrounds where you can t bring wood in. Gotta protect those trees though! We have a lot of hedge. It pops and sparks a lot sometimes,
    Message 1 of 28 , Apr 3, 2013
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      I've heard of other campgrounds where you can't bring wood in. Gotta protect those trees though!
      We have a lot of hedge. It pops and sparks a lot sometimes, but at least it doesn't put off an odor like cedar or pine. We keep those woods for straight campfires, not cooking fires. Ash is fairly common around here also, and makes pretty good fire.
      Doug made us a folding fire ring. I like to shape it like a keyhole sort of, with fire at round end, and cooking at the narrow end. It works pretty well for both tripod cooking, or cooking in or over the coals.
      Nothing wrong with an adult beverage while waiting on those coals either! Ronda

      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Ellen Williams <ewilliams9780@...> wrote:
      >
      > I am not Becky, but we use what ever is at the campground. No longer
      > able to bring wood in because of some dumb bug that gets in the wood.
      > You just have to keep up with the coals and do not put the flame of
      > added wood under the pot. We have burned a few things. Better longer
      > than fast with wood.
      >
      > We have a lot of Cottonwood up here and it burns fast, so you need
      > more of it than hard woods.
      >
      > Pine is not a good wood to use for cooking. Gives that pine taste.
      >
      > And when you are done DO cooking, you can do marshmallows!!!! We are
      > trying to experiment with the pie irons and other ways to cook sweets.
      >
      > It is fun and a few adult beverages waiting on the coals or the meal
      > makes it more fun.
      >
      > Ellen Williams
      > North Dakota
      >
      > On 4/3/13, rlb_51 <rlb_51@...> wrote:
      > > What kind of wood is best for cooking Becky? What kinds are strictly a
      > > no-no? Ronda
      > >
      > > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@>
      > > wrote:
      > >>
      > >> My family and friends all started out cooking over wood fires. We use our
      > >> tripods over the fire for beans, stews, etc. but also use the wood coals
      > >> in place of charcoal. Each type of wood burns differently as far as heat
      > >> so we have learned to adjust by 'feel.' We love it!
      > >> Becky in MO
      > >>
      > >> >
      > >> > At 4/2/2013 09:44 PM,rlb_51 wrote:
      > >> > >
      > >> > >
      > >> > >I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just
      > >> > >curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire?
      > >> >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Dwayne Lejeune
      I believe u can use local wood. Your not suppose to haul in out side wood. We also cook over camp fire. Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this
      Message 2 of 28 , Apr 3, 2013
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        I believe u can use local wood. Your not suppose to haul in out side wood. We also cook over camp fire.

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Apr 3, 2013, at 10:02 AM, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@...> wrote:

        > I've heard of other campgrounds where you can't bring wood in. Gotta protect those trees though!
        > We have a lot of hedge. It pops and sparks a lot sometimes, but at least it doesn't put off an odor like cedar or pine. We keep those woods for straight campfires, not cooking fires. Ash is fairly common around here also, and makes pretty good fire.
        > Doug made us a folding fire ring. I like to shape it like a keyhole sort of, with fire at round end, and cooking at the narrow end. It works pretty well for both tripod cooking, or cooking in or over the coals.
        > Nothing wrong with an adult beverage while waiting on those coals either! Ronda
        >
        > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Ellen Williams <ewilliams9780@...> wrote:
        > >
        > > I am not Becky, but we use what ever is at the campground. No longer
        > > able to bring wood in because of some dumb bug that gets in the wood.
        > > You just have to keep up with the coals and do not put the flame of
        > > added wood under the pot. We have burned a few things. Better longer
        > > than fast with wood.
        > >
        > > We have a lot of Cottonwood up here and it burns fast, so you need
        > > more of it than hard woods.
        > >
        > > Pine is not a good wood to use for cooking. Gives that pine taste.
        > >
        > > And when you are done DO cooking, you can do marshmallows!!!! We are
        > > trying to experiment with the pie irons and other ways to cook sweets.
        > >
        > > It is fun and a few adult beverages waiting on the coals or the meal
        > > makes it more fun.
        > >
        > > Ellen Williams
        > > North Dakota
        > >
        > > On 4/3/13, rlb_51 <rlb_51@...> wrote:
        > > > What kind of wood is best for cooking Becky? What kinds are strictly a
        > > > no-no? Ronda
        > > >
        > > > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@>
        > > > wrote:
        > > >>
        > > >> My family and friends all started out cooking over wood fires. We use our
        > > >> tripods over the fire for beans, stews, etc. but also use the wood coals
        > > >> in place of charcoal. Each type of wood burns differently as far as heat
        > > >> so we have learned to adjust by 'feel.' We love it!
        > > >> Becky in MO
        > > >>
        > > >> >
        > > >> > At 4/2/2013 09:44 PM,rlb_51 wrote:
        > > >> > >
        > > >> > >
        > > >> > >I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just
        > > >> > >curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire?
        > > >> >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • John
        For Years I used Oak pallets. At work they threw 100 s away a week. I used to take my Sawzall and cut the flat slat & stack them in Milk cartons. I had 20 or
        Message 3 of 28 , Apr 3, 2013
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          For Years I used Oak pallets. At work they threw 100's away a week. I used to take my Sawzall and cut the flat slat & stack them in Milk cartons.
          I had 20 or so milk cartons. I used a bottom third of a 55 gal drum to cook on. Build a nice fire with pallets and when wood was burned down I had a nice bed of coals to cook with. Hedge works good too if you can put up with the popping. When burnt down they make great coals to cook with. I've cooked with wood for years before I found about charcoal. Wishbone-Ks
        • mississippi_biscuit
          Types of wood to use? I believe hard woods are the best use. Oak, Hickory, Pecan.I think hickory is the best choice for the BBQers.
          Message 4 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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            Types of wood to use?

            I believe hard woods are the best use. Oak, Hickory, Pecan.I think hickory is the best choice for the BBQers.
          • icookforcrowds
            Hedge burns hot so we don t have to use as many coals, I don t really like the smell of cedar and pine, and oak is hard to burn unless it is really dry and
            Message 5 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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              Hedge burns hot so we don't have to use as many coals, I don't really like the smell of cedar and pine, and oak is hard to burn unless it is really dry and seasoned. Other than that, I don't know that I have a preference. Each wood burns differently so you really have to get used to how your desired temperature feels when you hold your hand over the lid and beside the bottom. It's not as predictable as with charcoal, which I use when I cook outside my back door on my deck, but cooking with wood is fun and helps me tap into my inner 'pioneer woman!' I love that part of history and pioneer women are my heros!
              Becky

              --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@...> wrote:
              >
              > What kind of wood is best for cooking Becky? What kinds are strictly a no-no? Ronda
              >
              > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@> wrote:
              > >
              > > My family and friends all started out cooking over wood fires. We use our tripods over the fire for beans, stews, etc. but also use the wood coals in place of charcoal. Each type of wood burns differently as far as heat so we have learned to adjust by 'feel.' We love it!
              > > Becky in MO
              > >
              > > >
              > > > At 4/2/2013 09:44 PM,rlb_51 wrote:
              > > > >
              > > > >
              > > > >I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just
              > > > >curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire?
              > > >
              >
            • Dwayne Lejeune
              I try and get pallets. Cut them up and get a good fire going. Since it burns real quick I may put some oak on top to get a lasting fire. If oak is not seasoned
              Message 6 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                I try and get pallets. Cut them up and get a good fire going. Since it burns real quick I may put some oak on top to get a lasting fire. If oak is not seasoned I may throw a piece or two of the cut up pallet to get more heat if needed. You really have to work try and for sure watch closely when using wood for heat.

                Sent from my iPhone

                On Apr 4, 2013, at 6:15 AM, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@...> wrote:

                > Hedge burns hot so we don't have to use as many coals, I don't really like the smell of cedar and pine, and oak is hard to burn unless it is really dry and seasoned. Other than that, I don't know that I have a preference. Each wood burns differently so you really have to get used to how your desired temperature feels when you hold your hand over the lid and beside the bottom. It's not as predictable as with charcoal, which I use when I cook outside my back door on my deck, but cooking with wood is fun and helps me tap into my inner 'pioneer woman!' I love that part of history and pioneer women are my heros!
                > Becky
                >
                > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > What kind of wood is best for cooking Becky? What kinds are strictly a no-no? Ronda
                > >
                > > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > My family and friends all started out cooking over wood fires. We use our tripods over the fire for beans, stews, etc. but also use the wood coals in place of charcoal. Each type of wood burns differently as far as heat so we have learned to adjust by 'feel.' We love it!
                > > > Becky in MO
                > > >
                > > > >
                > > > > At 4/2/2013 09:44 PM,rlb_51 wrote:
                > > > > >
                > > > > >
                > > > > >I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just
                > > > > >curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire?
                > > > >
                > >
                >
                >


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • rlb_51
                I agree Becky, I like cooking with wood, just haven t gotten into the baking part of it yet, only soups and stews, chili, etc. Somewhere I saw an article on
                Message 7 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                  I agree Becky, I like cooking with wood, just haven't gotten into the baking part of it yet, only soups and stews, chili, etc. Somewhere I saw an article on cooking with wood and it had a chart that showed how you could make an estimated guess of the temperature based on the number of seconds you could hold your hand over the coals. But you're right, a person could probably guage it pretty closely once they get some experience with cooking this way. Ronda

                  --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hedge burns hot so we don't have to use as many coals, I don't really like the smell of cedar and pine, and oak is hard to burn unless it is really dry and seasoned. Other than that, I don't know that I have a preference. Each wood burns differently so you really have to get used to how your desired temperature feels when you hold your hand over the lid and beside the bottom. It's not as predictable as with charcoal, which I use when I cook outside my back door on my deck, but cooking with wood is fun and helps me tap into my inner 'pioneer woman!' I love that part of history and pioneer women are my heros!
                  > Becky
                  >
                  > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > > What kind of wood is best for cooking Becky? What kinds are strictly a no-no? Ronda
                  > >
                  > > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > My family and friends all started out cooking over wood fires. We use our tripods over the fire for beans, stews, etc. but also use the wood coals in place of charcoal. Each type of wood burns differently as far as heat so we have learned to adjust by 'feel.' We love it!
                  > > > Becky in MO
                  > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > At 4/2/2013 09:44 PM,rlb_51 wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > >I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just
                  > > > > >curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire?
                  > > > >
                  > >
                  >
                • Greg Jacobs
                  Hardwoods, oak, maple, hickory & walnut, burn the best!! Using a small amount of pine is good to start a fire, but if you use it to cook with, the pine soot is
                  Message 8 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                    Hardwoods, oak, maple, hickory & walnut, burn the best!! Using a small amount of pine is good to start a fire, but if you use it to cook with, the pine soot is really tough to clean off of the pots!!!Greg

                    --- On Thu, 4/4/13, icookforcrowds <whitecrew5@...> wrote:

                    From: icookforcrowds <whitecrew5@...>
                    Subject: [dutchovencooking] Re: How many of you cook over campfires?
                    To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Thursday, April 4, 2013, 6:15 AM
















                     









                    Hedge burns hot so we don't have to use as many coals, I don't really like the smell of cedar and pine, and oak is hard to burn unless it is really dry and seasoned. Other than that, I don't know that I have a preference. Each wood burns differently so you really have to get used to how your desired temperature feels when you hold your hand over the lid and beside the bottom. It's not as predictable as with charcoal, which I use when I cook outside my back door on my deck, but cooking with wood is fun and helps me tap into my inner 'pioneer woman!' I love that part of history and pioneer women are my heros!

                    Becky



                    --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@...> wrote:

                    >

                    > What kind of wood is best for cooking Becky? What kinds are strictly a no-no? Ronda

                    >

                    > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "icookforcrowds" <whitecrew5@> wrote:

                    > >

                    > > My family and friends all started out cooking over wood fires. We use our tripods over the fire for beans, stews, etc. but also use the wood coals in place of charcoal. Each type of wood burns differently as far as heat so we have learned to adjust by 'feel.' We love it!

                    > > Becky in MO

                    > >

                    > > >

                    > > > At 4/2/2013 09:44 PM,rlb_51 wrote:

                    > > > >

                    > > > >

                    > > > >I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just

                    > > > >curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire?

                    > > >

                    >



























                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Mark & Barbara Wilkins
                    Mesquite is what we desire when cooking with the chuckwagon for a good bed of coals. Saturday for our fundraiser we used pistachio for our smoker when we did
                    Message 9 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                      Mesquite is what we desire when cooking with the chuckwagon for a good bed of coals. Saturday for our fundraiser we used pistachio for our smoker when we did 400lbs of pork.
                       
                      Mark
                       

                      From: mississippi_biscuit <n5hbb@...>
                      To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, April 4, 2013 2:58 AM
                      Subject: [dutchovencooking] Re: How many of you cook over campfires?

                       
                      Types of wood to use?

                      I believe hard woods are the best use. Oak, Hickory, Pecan.I think hickory is the best choice for the BBQers.




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jean
                      I d rather cook over the fire than on the stove. Most campgrounds I ve been to have a grate that will flip down over the fire if you haven t gotten a tripod
                      Message 10 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                        I'd rather cook over the fire than on the stove. Most campgrounds I've been to have a grate that will flip down over the fire if you haven't gotten a tripod yet. To bad that the local campground don't open for several more weeks.

                        It's opening of Trout Season in NC, so it's a good time to get those sportsman's grills out.

                        Jean in NC
                      • Randy Brown
                        Don t forget Mesquite if you have access to it. -- Randy Splatterdab Brown Where the cowboy coffee is always hot Web Site: http://www.splatterdab.com/vfbp/
                        Message 11 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                          Don't forget Mesquite if you have access to it.

                          --
                          Randy "Splatterdab" Brown
                          Where the cowboy coffee is always hot
                          Web Site: http://www.splatterdab.com/vfbp/


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • rlb_51
                          Not much mesquite in Kansas. Ronda
                          Message 12 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                            Not much mesquite in Kansas. Ronda

                            --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Randy Brown <splatterdab@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Don't forget Mesquite if you have access to it.
                            >
                            > --
                            > Randy "Splatterdab" Brown
                            > Where the cowboy coffee is always hot
                            > Web Site: http://www.splatterdab.com/vfbp/
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                          • crosscountrydutchovens
                            I love campfire cooking! Another option if your campsite allows you to dig a hole in the firepit,is Bean Hole Cooking . We dig a hole and cook over an open
                            Message 13 of 28 , Apr 4, 2013
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                              I love campfire cooking! Another option if your campsite allows you to dig a hole in the firepit,is "Bean Hole Cooking". We dig a hole and cook over an open fire for one meal- soup, chili, etc, then once the coals are really hot, wood burned down to red hot coals-little to no flames (usually 2hrs or so), we prepare for the next meal by putting a DO (w/ lid) full of food down in the wood coals and pile coals on top. Then cover the pot & coals with dirt - up to 8-10 hrs.

                              You can go to bed,go fishing, or whatever and not have to watch the pot. No need to worry about an open flame it's all buried. Then later in the day or overnight, dig up and you have a wonderful meal. Great way to get double use out of the campfire. Our favorite, is roast, potatoes, carrots, and cabbage w/ a little water & onion soup mix. We LOVE campfires and Bean Hole Cooking!
                              Lorri Lyn / Cross Country Dutch Ovens
                            • Biscuit T. Sims
                              Randy, I was going to mention that , but can t spell Mesquite. My spell checker was asleep. GOD BLESS YOU ! The Happy Dutch Oven Cook Biscuit T. Sims [Non-text
                              Message 14 of 28 , Apr 6, 2013
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                                Randy, I was going to mention that , but can't spell Mesquite. My spell checker was asleep.

                                GOD BLESS YOU !



                                The Happy Dutch Oven Cook



                                Biscuit T. Sims

                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Kevin
                                ... Hello I am Kevin from Montana, I love cooking over a open fire with tripod and dutch oven,I stack a London broil steak on top of a corned beef brisket,be
                                Message 15 of 28 , Apr 12, 2013
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                                  --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire? A recent post reminded me that there are a few things we almost always cook over a campfire with a tripod, and and one of those is beans. Ham and beans, and it can be pinto beans, red beans, navy beans, whatever, are best cooked over an open fire. I don't know why, but they are! We've cooked beans that way for several years now and never had a bad batch. We use a deep 12" no name oven, always have. And they always turn out good. We never have any problems with gray or purple beans as some folks mention.
                                  > Some other things we like to cook over the campfire, with a tripod, are jambalaya, gumbo and chili. There's just something special about cooking over a fire that we like. Ya know what I mean? I wish I could get more proficient at baking with real campfire coals. Ronda
                                  >
                                  Hello I am Kevin from Montana, I love cooking over a open fire with tripod and dutch oven,I stack a London broil steak on top of a corned beef brisket,be sure to use a meat trivet and cook low and slow,a good rub works well with the meat!!Check every 30 min add a little water at first,Give it a try!!
                                • vanhorn_pam
                                  Cooking over an open fire is the only way I do it. I just love this way of cooking. I use a hook system to lower and raise my dutch ovens, so I get the
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Apr 13, 2013
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                                    Cooking over an open fire is the only way I do it. I just love this way of cooking. I use a hook system to lower and raise my dutch ovens, so I get the correct heat. I cook everything this way. Breads, desserts, meats, casseroles, soups etc. Have I had disasters?
                                    Sure, but I have had those on my stove also. I just learn from my mistakes. I started watching Johnny Nix on tv several years ago and he made it look fun and easy. I thought I would give it a try and now, it is not only a hobby but a passion. I love making a great meal for my friends and family while everyone sits around the fire talking.

                                    --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire? A recent post reminded me that there are a few things we almost always cook over a campfire with a tripod, and and one of those is beans. Ham and beans, and it can be pinto beans, red beans, navy beans, whatever, are best cooked over an open fire. I don't know why, but they are! We've cooked beans that way for several years now and never had a bad batch. We use a deep 12" no name oven, always have. And they always turn out good. We never have any problems with gray or purple beans as some folks mention.
                                    > Some other things we like to cook over the campfire, with a tripod, are jambalaya, gumbo and chili. There's just something special about cooking over a fire that we like. Ya know what I mean? I wish I could get more proficient at baking with real campfire coals. Ronda
                                    >
                                  • John
                                    I cook over the fire as much as I can. We have a big fire ring and a hook system. Works great, is a lot of fun, and no cheanup of charcoal. John
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Apr 14, 2013
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                                      I cook over the fire as much as I can. We have a big fire ring and a hook system. Works great, is a lot of fun, and no cheanup of charcoal.
                                      John
                                      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "vanhorn_pam" <epvanhorn@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      > Cooking over an open fire is the only way I do it. I just love this way of cooking. I use a hook system to lower and raise my dutch ovens, so I get the correct heat. I cook everything this way. Breads, desserts, meats, casseroles, soups etc. Have I had disasters?
                                      > Sure, but I have had those on my stove also. I just learn from my mistakes. I started watching Johnny Nix on tv several years ago and he made it look fun and easy. I thought I would give it a try and now, it is not only a hobby but a passion. I love making a great meal for my friends and family while everyone sits around the fire talking.
                                      >
                                      > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlb_51" <rlb_51@> wrote:
                                      > >
                                      > > I know everyone uses charcoal for cooking a lot of things, just curious as to how many actually cook over a wood fire? A recent post reminded me that there are a few things we almost always cook over a campfire with a tripod, and and one of those is beans. Ham and beans, and it can be pinto beans, red beans, navy beans, whatever, are best cooked over an open fire. I don't know why, but they are! We've cooked beans that way for several years now and never had a bad batch. We use a deep 12" no name oven, always have. And they always turn out good. We never have any problems with gray or purple beans as some folks mention.
                                      > > Some other things we like to cook over the campfire, with a tripod, are jambalaya, gumbo and chili. There's just something special about cooking over a fire that we like. Ya know what I mean? I wish I could get more proficient at baking with real campfire coals. Ronda
                                      > >
                                      >
                                    • rlb_51
                                      Have you posted any pictures of your fire ring and hook system? I d love to see them! The previous poster also referred to a hook system. I d like to hear
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Apr 14, 2013
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                                        Have you posted any pictures of your fire ring and hook system? I'd love to see them! The previous poster also referred to a hook system. I'd like to hear more about that! Ronda

                                        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "John" <johnmadsen@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > I cook over the fire as much as I can. We have a big fire ring and a hook system. Works great, is a lot of fun, and no cheanup of charcoal.
                                        > John
                                        > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "vanhorn_pam" <epvanhorn@> wrote:
                                        > >
                                        > > Cooking over an open fire is the only way I do it. I just love this way of cooking. I use a hook system to lower and raise my dutch ovens, so I get the correct heat. I cook everything this way. Breads, desserts, meats, casseroles, soups etc. Have I had disasters?
                                        > > Sure, but I have had those on my stove also. I just learn from my mistakes. I started watching Johnny Nix on tv several years ago and he made it look fun and easy. I thought I would give it a try and now, it is not only a hobby but a passion. I love making a great meal for my friends and family while everyone sits around the fire talking.
                                        > >
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