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Has anyone tried this?

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  • Randy Hebert
    Here is something you may want to read about Coke for cleaning Cast Iron... http://www.ehow.com/how_5050044_clean-cast-iron-coke.html Then this one references
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 1, 2013
      Here is something you may want to read about Coke for cleaning Cast Iron...
      http://www.ehow.com/how_5050044_clean-cast-iron-coke.html

      Then this one references to what's REALLY going on with Coke...
      http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/phosphoric-acid-rust-removal-210082/
      So is it removing the rust or converting it to something else??? You decide.

      I will stick to my Electrolysis because I know it works, I know how easy it works and its easiest method for me... I don't like to apply much elbow grease these days.
      I have plenty of resources for mechanically spot cleaning cast iron. There are plenty of air tools and wire brushes around here to make quick work of rust removal but I choose electrolysis over mechanical almost always. Grinding, blasting and using harsh corrosives can dramatically change the surface tension of the metal creating issues for properly accruing a good patina. My exposure to metallurgy dealing with aircraft as a Level II NDT inspector has had a lot of influence in my judgment.

      My biggest problem is having a place to set up my 50 gallon tank under a roof. I use a rubber water container liked built for holding feed but they don’t make a lid for it.

      Im glad Camp Chef likes the phosphoric acid process. But I think it has its limits and I want to remove rust not convert Iron Oxide (rust) to Iron Phosphate.

      Here is a blurp from another website to connect the dots for you!
      When iron phosphate is applied to a metal surface, it actually etches [takes away metal] the surface slightly. A very small amount of metal is removed from the surface and then re-deposited in an irregular fashion. Since the surface characteristics are varied in this way after phosphate is applied, there is more surface area [pitting] for paint [or carbonized oils] to adhere to. However, this etching also has the side effect of permanently removing [go back two words- "Permanently Removing"] some of the metal, since not all of it is re-deposited.
      Reference- http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-iron-phosphate.htm

      Now the question is would you use phosphoric acid it to clean your great grandmothers coveted 12" Spider you had to arm wrestle away from your sibling???

      Randy Hebert

      More references:

      Here's my biggest influence for electrolysis- Machined Car Parts!
      http://antique-engines.com/electrol.asp

      Electrolysis is also used in the cleaning and preservation of old artifacts. Because the process separates the non-metallic particles from the metallic ones, it is very useful for cleaning old coins and even larger objects.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolysis
      -----Original Message-----
      On Behalf Of Mark & Barbara Wilkins
      Has anyone tried this?

      Depends on how often you will be using it. The coke is good for only one shot, whereas, the electrolysis method can be used over & over. I had a guy stop by our fundraiser Saturday morning asking the best way to clean a rusty pot; told him about the elecrolysis and he went home to do it. Came back in the afternoon and expressed his gratitude -- that it had worked perfectly and saved him a lot of grief using a drill & wire wheel. He was so tickled !

      Mark

      From: Lori <bakequery@...>
      To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 4:54 PM
      Subject: [dutchovencooking] Has anyone tried this?


      I saw this on the Camp Chef website:

      Have a Rusty Oven?

      Though there are many methods for cleaning rusty ovens, the one that we have found to be the easiest to use is a can of Cola. If the inside is rusty, pour the Cola in and let it do its job. Depending on how rusty the oven is will depend on how long you will need to leave the Cola on the rusty spot. If you have an issue with the outside of an oven, use a sponge to apply the Cola, or place the cast iron in a large bowl or bucket with enough Cola to dissolve the rust (some rotating may be necessary). After rust is removed be sure to wash and re-season you cast iron.

      Our daughter left her 10" DO out in the elements for quite some time. It's rusty and pitted. Before I go the electrolysis route I'm thinking about figuring out how much Cola it would take to fill this oven and then fill 'er up. It seems like it would be cheaper than buying a battery charger.

      Lori
    • Lori
      Randy, thank you very much. That thread had a wealth of information. I m going to stick to my original plan: 1) Run pot through self-cleaning oven cycle.
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 1, 2013
        Randy, thank you very much. That thread had a wealth of information. I'm going to stick to my original plan:

        1) Run pot through self-cleaning oven cycle. Wasn't able to do that this past Friday.

        2) Mount a cone shaped steel brush on my cordless drill and spend some time brushing it.

        3) Put the pot through electrolysis. I am sold on that idea. You've convinced me that all the other ideas are not really as good a solution.

        Lori

        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Randy Hebert" <RandyHebert@...> wrote:
        >
        > Here is something you may want to read about Coke for cleaning Cast Iron...
        > http://www.ehow.com/how_5050044_clean-cast-iron-coke.html
        >
        > Then this one references to what's REALLY going on with Coke...
        > http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general/phosphoric-acid-rust-removal-210082/
        > So is it removing the rust or converting it to something else??? You decide.
        >
        > I will stick to my Electrolysis because I know it works, I know how easy it works and its easiest method for me... I don't like to apply much elbow grease these days.
        > I have plenty of resources for mechanically spot cleaning cast iron. There are plenty of air tools and wire brushes around here to make quick work of rust removal but I choose electrolysis over mechanical almost always. Grinding, blasting and using harsh corrosives can dramatically change the surface tension of the metal creating issues for properly accruing a good patina. My exposure to metallurgy dealing with aircraft as a Level II NDT inspector has had a lot of influence in my judgment.
        >
        > My biggest problem is having a place to set up my 50 gallon tank under a roof. I use a rubber water container liked built for holding feed but they don’t make a lid for it.
        >
        > Im glad Camp Chef likes the phosphoric acid process. But I think it has its limits and I want to remove rust not convert Iron Oxide (rust) to Iron Phosphate.
        >
        > Here is a blurp from another website to connect the dots for you!
        > When iron phosphate is applied to a metal surface, it actually etches [takes away metal] the surface slightly. A very small amount of metal is removed from the surface and then re-deposited in an irregular fashion. Since the surface characteristics are varied in this way after phosphate is applied, there is more surface area [pitting] for paint [or carbonized oils] to adhere to. However, this etching also has the side effect of permanently removing [go back two words- "Permanently Removing"] some of the metal, since not all of it is re-deposited.
        > Reference- http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-iron-phosphate.htm
        >
        > Now the question is would you use phosphoric acid it to clean your great grandmothers coveted 12" Spider you had to arm wrestle away from your sibling???
        >
        > Randy Hebert
        >
        > More references:
        >
        > Here's my biggest influence for electrolysis- Machined Car Parts!
        > http://antique-engines.com/electrol.asp
        >
        > Electrolysis is also used in the cleaning and preservation of old artifacts. Because the process separates the non-metallic particles from the metallic ones, it is very useful for cleaning old coins and even larger objects.
        > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electrolysis
        > -----Original Message-----
        > On Behalf Of Mark & Barbara Wilkins
        > Has anyone tried this?
        >
        > Depends on how often you will be using it. The coke is good for only one shot, whereas, the electrolysis method can be used over & over. I had a guy stop by our fundraiser Saturday morning asking the best way to clean a rusty pot; told him about the elecrolysis and he went home to do it. Came back in the afternoon and expressed his gratitude -- that it had worked perfectly and saved him a lot of grief using a drill & wire wheel. He was so tickled !
        >
        > Mark
        >
        > From: Lori <bakequery@...>
        > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Saturday, March 23, 2013 4:54 PM
        > Subject: [dutchovencooking] Has anyone tried this?
        >
        >
        > I saw this on the Camp Chef website:
        >
        > Have a Rusty Oven?
        >
        > Though there are many methods for cleaning rusty ovens, the one that we have found to be the easiest to use is a can of Cola. If the inside is rusty, pour the Cola in and let it do its job. Depending on how rusty the oven is will depend on how long you will need to leave the Cola on the rusty spot. If you have an issue with the outside of an oven, use a sponge to apply the Cola, or place the cast iron in a large bowl or bucket with enough Cola to dissolve the rust (some rotating may be necessary). After rust is removed be sure to wash and re-season you cast iron.
        >
        > Our daughter left her 10" DO out in the elements for quite some time. It's rusty and pitted. Before I go the electrolysis route I'm thinking about figuring out how much Cola it would take to fill this oven and then fill 'er up. It seems like it would be cheaper than buying a battery charger.
        >
        > Lori
        >
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