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Re: Learning As I Go!

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  • Jonas
    Thank you, Jason! That sounds like a very good option!
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 5, 2011
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      Thank you, Jason! That sounds like a very good option!

      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "jasonjelinek" <jason@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hey Jonas,
      >
      > It seems to me your experience with the chicken falling off the bone and not being carveable is similar to when ribs fall off the bone. It means the ribs were steamed at some point in the cooking process (IE: for ribs you take them out of the smoker, rap them in foil and let them sit in their heat and they steam off the bone).
      >
      > The lid on our beloved ovens are heavy and fit tightly and do a good job of keeping the juices in the pot...and are likely steaming the contents a bit in the process.
      >
      > I know when I grill turkey the heat is dry and offset. Possibly a little something to keep the lid cracked would help achieve the browning you desire as well as the carveablity. Brine or inject your bird though so you don't have a nice carvable, dry chicken.
      >
      > Jason
      > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Jonas" <j_sears98@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Hi, Group!
      > > I think I just learned an important lesson about technique, and wanted some confirmation/advice before I haphazardly experiment with my family's future dinners.
      > <SNIP>
      >
    • Jonas
      Thank you, Randy! I love this dutch oven cooking. And man, it is an efficient process! Originally from Missouri, spending a half decade in Des Moines going to
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 5, 2011
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        Thank you, Randy! I love this dutch oven cooking. And man, it is an efficient process! Originally from Missouri, spending a half decade in Des Moines going to school, I've lived in South Florida for the past 30+ years. I certainly have year-round weather to enjoy my ovens. Reading the posts of very active dutch oven and outdoor chefs like yourself is not only very enlightening, but the photos offer me an "absentee" participation at the DOGs up north.

        Wishing everyone the best during these cold storms.

        -Jonas



        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Randy Hebert" <RandyHebert@...> wrote:
        >
        > I think what you have observed is the efficiency of Cat Iron Cooking.
        >
        > I remember something about folks talking about the UTR and having trouble
        > with browning. I also someone else recommending cracking the lid a bit to
        > let air circulate some.
        >
        > The last Bird I cooked in my 16" deep was a turkey breast. That's what they
        > called it but it was really a whole turkey with the legs, thighs and wings
        > removed. The back was still intact with the rest of the carcus. It browned
        > up nicely and it was cooked all the way but I believe it was cooked way
        > before I checked on it. The popper thingy was up and the temperature was
        > more then it needed (I checked it with a thermometer) and yet my bird was
        > still moist. Another trait for cooking in Cast Iron with a proper fitting
        > lid. I would have probably ruined it had I used something else besides a
        > cast iron DO.
        >
        > Randy Bear
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jonas
        > Sent: Tuesday, February 01, 2011 10:04 AM
        > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
        >
        > Hi, Group!
        > I think I just learned an important lesson about technique, and wanted some
        > confirmation/advice before I haphazardly experiment with my family's future
        > dinners.
        >
        > Yesterday, I roasted a whole chicken... about 5lbs... in my 15" Maca. The
        > chicken was hefty and I wanted plenty of room for it. It was perfect around
        > the walls, but a little spacious above between the lid and meat. Initially,
        > I used the standard number of briquets rule to generate 400 degrees with
        > much of the heat on top. Needless to say, I went through two rounds of
        > briquets for an hour and a half of cooking time. After the first load was
        > being exhausted, I took a peak inside and noticed that my chicken was baking
        > and not getting that beautiful, crisp browning on top. Naturally, I presumed
        > that it wasn't getting enough heat on top and increased the 2nd load of
        > briquets for a more intense heat. It didn't do the job of browning and the
        > chicken was definitely done.. but pale in color. I then sprinkled some red
        > seasoning on it and gave it another 15-20 minutes under the heat. It turned
        > out to be acceptable looking but not what I planned. The meat was
        > falling-apart tender... and was a bit overcooked for my tastes. Made an
        > appealing carve job a chore.
        >
        > Now, the question. I suppose I figured it out already, but I'm open for
        > suggestions. I presume my alternatives were (1) use a shallower oven to get
        > the meat closer to the heat (2) brown the meat before I roast (3) decrease
        > the steaming effect by using a baster bulb to remove juices from the bottom
        > of the pot during roasting. From others' experiences, which is the most
        > practical?
        >
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group,
        > click on "Edit My Membership" at the top right of the Group main page.
        > Then click on "Leave Group".Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
      • Jonas
        Thank you for your resourceful suggestion, Leon. I have a couple of those stands for my grill, and never considered it! -Jonas
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 5, 2011
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          Thank you for your resourceful suggestion, Leon. I have a couple of those stands for my grill, and never considered it!

          -Jonas

          --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Tom X <dome526@...> wrote:
          >
          > I would suggest using a Beer Can Chicken stand to get the chicken up higher. 
          > The other suggestion would be to cook a larger chicken using the beer can
          > stand.  It gets the chicken up higher.
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Leon Perkins <l599336@...>
          > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 1:19:53 PM
          > Subject: Re: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
          >
          >  
          > You can go this way http://tinyurl.com/4zsdegb
          > Or just use a propane torch.
          > Leon Perkins
          >
          > Western New York Dutch Oven Society
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: Jonas <j_sears98@...>
          > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 11:04:00 AM
          > Subject: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
          >
          > Hi, Group!
          > I think I just learned an important lesson about technique, and wanted some
          > confirmation/advice before I haphazardly experiment with my family's future
          > dinners.
          >
          > Yesterday, I roasted a whole chicken... about 5lbs... in my 15" Maca. The
          > chicken was hefty and I wanted plenty of room for it. It was perfect around the
          > walls, but a little spacious above between the lid and meat. Initially, I used
          > the standard number of briquets rule to generate 400 degrees with much of the
          > heat on top. Needless to say, I went through two rounds of briquets for an hour
          > and a half of cooking time. After the first load was being exhausted, I took a
          > peak inside and noticed that my chicken was baking and not getting that
          > beautiful, crisp browning on top. Naturally, I presumed that it wasn't getting
          > enough heat on top and increased the 2nd load of briquets for a more intense
          > heat. It didn't do the job of browning and the chicken was definitely done.. but
          >
          > pale in color. I then sprinkled some red seasoning on it and gave it another
          > 15-20 minutes under the heat. It turned out to be acceptable looking but not
          > what I planned. The meat was falling-apart tender... and was a bit overcooked
          > for my tastes. Made an appealing carve job a chore.
          >
          > Now, the question. I suppose I figured it out already, but I'm open for
          > suggestions. I presume my alternatives were (1) use a shallower oven to get the
          > meat closer to the heat (2) brown the meat before I roast (3) decrease the
          > steaming effect by using a baster bulb to remove juices from the bottom of the
          > pot during roasting. From others' experiences, which is the most practical?
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Jonas
          Yes, of course! Crisp the skin without drying out the breast with long-term heat... awesome! Thanks again!! -Jonas
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 5, 2011
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            Yes, of course! Crisp the skin without drying out the breast with long-term heat... awesome! Thanks again!!

            -Jonas

            --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Leon Perkins <l599336@...> wrote:
            >
            > You can go this way http://tinyurl.com/4zsdegb
            > Or just use a propane torch.
            > Leon Perkins
            >
            >
            > Western New York Dutch Oven Society
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > ________________________________
            > From: Jonas <j_sears98@...>
            > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
            > Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 11:04:00 AM
            > Subject: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
            >
            >
            > Hi, Group!
            > I think I just learned an important lesson about technique, and wanted some
            > confirmation/advice before I haphazardly experiment with my family's future
            > dinners.
            >
            > Yesterday, I roasted a whole chicken... about 5lbs... in my 15" Maca. The
            > chicken was hefty and I wanted plenty of room for it. It was perfect around the
            > walls, but a little spacious above between the lid and meat. Initially, I used
            > the standard number of briquets rule to generate 400 degrees with much of the
            > heat on top. Needless to say, I went through two rounds of briquets for an hour
            > and a half of cooking time. After the first load was being exhausted, I took a
            > peak inside and noticed that my chicken was baking and not getting that
            > beautiful, crisp browning on top. Naturally, I presumed that it wasn't getting
            > enough heat on top and increased the 2nd load of briquets for a more intense
            > heat. It didn't do the job of browning and the chicken was definitely done.. but
            > pale in color. I then sprinkled some red seasoning on it and gave it another
            > 15-20 minutes under the heat. It turned out to be acceptable looking but not
            > what I planned. The meat was falling-apart tender... and was a bit overcooked
            > for my tastes. Made an appealing carve job a chore.
            >
            > Now, the question. I suppose I figured it out already, but I'm open for
            > suggestions. I presume my alternatives were (1) use a shallower oven to get the
            > meat closer to the heat (2) brown the meat before I roast (3) decrease the
            > steaming effect by using a baster bulb to remove juices from the bottom of the
            > pot during roasting. From others' experiences, which is the most practical?
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Tom X
            Hi Jonas- Actually, that was my suggestion.    I bought it at the Vermont Country Store, however, here is a link to several different models at Amazon.
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 5, 2011
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Jonas- Actually, that was my suggestion.    I bought it at the Vermont
              Country Store, however, here is a link to several different models at Amazon.
              http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_nr_scat_13299251_ln?rh=n%3A13299251%2Ck%3Abeer+can+chicken+cooker&keywords=beer+can+chicken+cooker&ie=UTF8&qid=1296923259&scn=13299251&h=865123a1f7845a16cd9df6c9ee7b56202b545a7f

              Regards,
              Tom



              ________________________________
              From: Jonas <j_sears98@...>
              To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, February 5, 2011 10:40:25 AM
              Subject: [dutchovencooking] Re: Learning As I Go!

               
              Thank you for your resourceful suggestion, Leon. I have a couple of those stands
              for my grill, and never considered it!

              -Jonas

              --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Tom X <dome526@...> wrote:
              >
              > I would suggest using a Beer Can Chicken stand to get the chicken up higher. 

              > The other suggestion would be to cook a larger chicken using the beer can
              > stand.  It gets the chicken up higher.
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Leon Perkins <l599336@...>
              > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 1:19:53 PM
              > Subject: Re: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
              >
              >  
              > You can go this way http://tinyurl.com/4zsdegb
              > Or just use a propane torch.
              > Leon Perkins
              >
              > Western New York Dutch Oven Society
              >
              > ________________________________
              > From: Jonas <j_sears98@...>
              > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
              > Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 11:04:00 AM
              > Subject: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
              >
              > Hi, Group!
              > I think I just learned an important lesson about technique, and wanted some
              > confirmation/advice before I haphazardly experiment with my family's future
              > dinners.
              >
              > Yesterday, I roasted a whole chicken... about 5lbs... in my 15" Maca. The
              > chicken was hefty and I wanted plenty of room for it. It was perfect around the
              >
              > walls, but a little spacious above between the lid and meat. Initially, I used

              > the standard number of briquets rule to generate 400 degrees with much of the
              > heat on top. Needless to say, I went through two rounds of briquets for an hour
              >
              > and a half of cooking time. After the first load was being exhausted, I took a

              > peak inside and noticed that my chicken was baking and not getting that
              > beautiful, crisp browning on top. Naturally, I presumed that it wasn't getting

              > enough heat on top and increased the 2nd load of briquets for a more intense
              > heat. It didn't do the job of browning and the chicken was definitely done..
              >but
              >
              >
              > pale in color. I then sprinkled some red seasoning on it and gave it another
              > 15-20 minutes under the heat. It turned out to be acceptable looking but not
              > what I planned. The meat was falling-apart tender... and was a bit overcooked
              > for my tastes. Made an appealing carve job a chore.
              >
              > Now, the question. I suppose I figured it out already, but I'm open for
              > suggestions. I presume my alternatives were (1) use a shallower oven to get the
              >
              > meat closer to the heat (2) brown the meat before I roast (3) decrease the
              > steaming effect by using a baster bulb to remove juices from the bottom of the

              > pot during roasting. From others' experiences, which is the most practical?
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jonas
              Thank you, Tom! It makes a lot of sense: getting the bird up and out of what could be braising juices... and my birds produce a lot of juices because of
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 8, 2011
              • 0 Attachment
                Thank you, Tom! It makes a lot of sense: getting the bird up and out of what could be braising juices... and my birds produce a lot of "juices" because of brining or injection... and getting it closer to the main source of heat. Combine that with the slight cracking of the lid opening to reduce steam, and I believe I have this solution! Awesome! Thank you all!

                -Jonas

                --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Tom X <dome526@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hi Jonas- Actually, that was my suggestion.    I bought it at the Vermont
                > Country Store, however, here is a link to several different models at Amazon.
                > http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=sr_nr_scat_13299251_ln?rh=n%3A13299251%2Ck%3Abeer+can+chicken+cooker&keywords=beer+can+chicken+cooker&ie=UTF8&qid=1296923259&scn=13299251&h=865123a1f7845a16cd9df6c9ee7b56202b545a7f
                >
                > Regards,
                > Tom
                >
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: Jonas <j_sears98@...>
                > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Sat, February 5, 2011 10:40:25 AM
                > Subject: [dutchovencooking] Re: Learning As I Go!
                >
                >  
                > Thank you for your resourceful suggestion, Leon. I have a couple of those stands
                > for my grill, and never considered it!
                >
                > -Jonas
                >
                > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Tom X <dome526@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I would suggest using a Beer Can Chicken stand to get the chicken up higher. 
                >
                > > The other suggestion would be to cook a larger chicken using the beer can
                > > stand.  It gets the chicken up higher.
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > ________________________________
                > > From: Leon Perkins <l599336@>
                > > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
                > > Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 1:19:53 PM
                > > Subject: Re: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
                > >
                > >  
                > > You can go this way http://tinyurl.com/4zsdegb
                > > Or just use a propane torch.
                > > Leon Perkins
                > >
                > > Western New York Dutch Oven Society
                > >
                > > ________________________________
                > > From: Jonas <j_sears98@>
                > > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
                > > Sent: Tue, February 1, 2011 11:04:00 AM
                > > Subject: [dutchovencooking] Learning As I Go!
                > >
                > > Hi, Group!
                > > I think I just learned an important lesson about technique, and wanted some
                > > confirmation/advice before I haphazardly experiment with my family's future
                > > dinners.
                > >
                > > Yesterday, I roasted a whole chicken... about 5lbs... in my 15" Maca. The
                > > chicken was hefty and I wanted plenty of room for it. It was perfect around the
                > >
                > > walls, but a little spacious above between the lid and meat. Initially, I used
                >
                > > the standard number of briquets rule to generate 400 degrees with much of the
                > > heat on top. Needless to say, I went through two rounds of briquets for an hour
                > >
                > > and a half of cooking time. After the first load was being exhausted, I took a
                >
                > > peak inside and noticed that my chicken was baking and not getting that
                > > beautiful, crisp browning on top. Naturally, I presumed that it wasn't getting
                >
                > > enough heat on top and increased the 2nd load of briquets for a more intense
                > > heat. It didn't do the job of browning and the chicken was definitely done..
                > >but
                > >
                > >
                > > pale in color. I then sprinkled some red seasoning on it and gave it another
                > > 15-20 minutes under the heat. It turned out to be acceptable looking but not
                > > what I planned. The meat was falling-apart tender... and was a bit overcooked
                > > for my tastes. Made an appealing carve job a chore.
                > >
                > > Now, the question. I suppose I figured it out already, but I'm open for
                > > suggestions. I presume my alternatives were (1) use a shallower oven to get the
                > >
                > > meat closer to the heat (2) brown the meat before I roast (3) decrease the
                > > steaming effect by using a baster bulb to remove juices from the bottom of the
                >
                > > pot during roasting. From others' experiences, which is the most practical?
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
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