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Re: [dutchovencooking] Trying to Add Seasoning to Cast Iron Skillet

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  • robert cress
    Jeff, you should have turned it upside down and used Crisco instead of Canola oil. Been there, done that. Chili Bob I was always taught to respect my elders
    Message 1 of 13 , Jan 4, 2011
      Jeff, you should have turned it upside down and used Crisco instead of
      Canola oil.
      Been there, done that.
      Chili Bob

      I was always taught to respect my elders
      But it keeps getting harder to find one
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <scubatke@...>
      To: <dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Sunday, January 02, 2011 3:35 PM
      Subject: [dutchovencooking] Trying to Add Seasoning to Cast Iron Skillet


      > Greetings!
      >
      > New to the group after finding it while searching online for an answer to
      > a question I have. I live in Michigan and have been cooking with cast iron
      > since taking a dutch oven cooking class at a Cub Scout training day.
      >
      > I have a Cabela's cast iron skillet that I previously stripped and
      > re-seasoned with success. Over time the bottom has lost some of it's
      > seasoning so I'm trying to add some seasoning by warming the skillet and
      > applying a thin coat of canola oil and then putting it into the oven for
      > an hour (as outlined on the PapaDutch website). After pulling it from the
      > oven there is sort of a mottled appearance to the bottom and inside walls.
      > It looks almost like the oil beaded up before it hardened. Any idea what's
      > going on?
      >
      > Thanks!
      > Jeff
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • davidreidok
      Lots of theories on type of oil to use. I think they all work - some better or worse than others. Just for the fun of it, I tried the new to me Camp Chef cast
      Message 2 of 13 , Jan 4, 2011
        Lots of theories on type of oil to use. I think they all work - some better or worse than others.

        Just for the fun of it, I tried the new to me Camp Chef cast iron conditioner oil on an old style Lodge DO that I rescued from storage a few weeks ago.

        My wife would run me out of the house if I used her oven to season cast iron.

        One of my best DO cooking Buds uses his gas grill with a cover to do his seasoning.

        That is what I used. Plenty of room and no issue with the smoke.

        I put a thin coat of the camp chef oil on the inside of the DO and lid. put the lid on the bottom and the DO upside down on top of the lid.

        First run I had too much heat and did not like the results. Turned heat down to about a quarter of the dial travel and magic started.

        Based on my Bud's suggestion and the way the seasoning "took" I made three passes. (he allows it might take a few more, just season till it looks right) Result is just excellent seasoning and wife happy that I am on the deck not in the house. I rescued an antique sectioned corn bread fry pan that had been left in the family barn for decades, using the same technique. Just made corn bread with it and it is nice to have a full crust on every section of corn bread and not have to slice it.
      • scubatke@sbcglobal.net
        Thanks everybody for all of the responses; what a nice community! I tried Crisco as well as more time and more heat (425 for 2 hours) and the results were very
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 5, 2011
          Thanks everybody for all of the responses; what a nice community!

          I tried Crisco as well as more time and more heat (425 for 2 hours) and the results were very good. There is a nice layer of seasoning all over the skillet. I can still see the splotches faintly under the new seasoning so I hope they don't flake off but if they do I will know what to do after starting over.

          This is a very big skillet...could that have been part of the problem?


          --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "scubatke@..." <scubatke@...> wrote:
          >
          > Greetings!
          >
          > New to the group after finding it while searching online for an answer to a question I have. I live in Michigan and have been cooking with cast iron since taking a dutch oven cooking class at a Cub Scout training day.
          >
          > I have a Cabela's cast iron skillet that I previously stripped and re-seasoned with success. Over time the bottom has lost some of it's seasoning so I'm trying to add some seasoning by warming the skillet and applying a thin coat of canola oil and then putting it into the oven for an hour (as outlined on the PapaDutch website). After pulling it from the oven there is sort of a mottled appearance to the bottom and inside walls. It looks almost like the oil beaded up before it hardened. Any idea what's going on?
          >
          > Thanks!
          > Jeff
          >
        • Randy Hebert
          I don t know... Is it bigger than 19 ? My favorite patrol egg cooker is 19 and I didn t have a problem seasoning it. That big ole skillet will make some
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 5, 2011
            I don't know... Is it bigger than 19"? My favorite patrol egg cooker is
            19" and I didn't have a problem seasoning it.

            That big ole skillet will make some mean breakfast burritos too!

            Randy Bear

            -----Original Message-----
            On Behalf Of scubatke@...
            Trying to Add Seasoning to Cast Iron Skillet

            Thanks everybody for all of the responses; what a nice community!

            I tried Crisco as well as more time and more heat (425 for 2 hours) and the
            results were very good. There is a nice layer of seasoning all over the
            skillet. I can still see the splotches faintly under the new seasoning so I
            hope they don't flake off but if they do I will know what to do after
            starting over.

            This is a very big skillet...could that have been part of the problem?
          • Richard
            I have seen this kind of mottled appearance myself when re-seasoning vintage iron that I acquired and cleaned up to re-season. Like you, I re-seasoned, another
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 6, 2011
              I have seen this kind of mottled appearance myself when re-seasoning vintage iron that I acquired and cleaned up to re-season. Like you, I re-seasoned, another very light coat and heating cycle around 400 - 410 degrees and it improved the appearance. The surface was already smooth and slick before the second and subsequent runs, but the color darkened and evened out with use and additional seasoning. You might consider trying the CampChef Conditioner - it's more $, but it puts a great dark, durable finish on your iron, and stands up very well to the higher temperatures. I like it.

              Rich in KS

              --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "scubatke@..." <scubatke@...> wrote:
              >
              > Thanks everybody for all of the responses; what a nice community!
              >
              > I tried Crisco as well as more time and more heat (425 for 2 hours) and the results were very good. There is a nice layer of seasoning all over the skillet. I can still see the splotches faintly under the new seasoning so I hope they don't flake off but if they do I will know what to do after starting over.
              >
              > This is a very big skillet...could that have been part of the problem?
              >
              >
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