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Re: Cooking pintos?

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  • dutchovenben <benjammin@gtemail.net>
    You surely can cook a good pot of beans in a DO. If they re turning black, it from something in the pot, probably either she s burning the beans somehow, or
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 3, 2003
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      You surely can cook a good pot of beans in a DO. If they're turning
      black, it from something in the pot, probably either she's burning
      the beans somehow, or there's a residue in the pot, possibly even
      burnt seasoning or grease. I've probably cooked a couple hundred
      pots of pintos in my lifetime in cast iron, and I've never had a bean
      go black, unless I mixed black beans in with my pintos (ha ha, but
      true). Wierd.

      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, Lotus & Lilies
      <lilyponder@d...> wrote:
      > Hi,
      > Can you cook pinto beans in cast iron? the reason I asked is
      because my
      > sister said hers always turn black, she has tried several times
      with no
      > luck, she uses her DO and never has any luck with the pinto beans..
      I'm
      > thinking that it can be done because surely the oldtimers and trail
      > riders along time ago hung the pots in the fireplace and on open
      fires
      > and cooked brown beans.
      > thanks in advance
      > Shirley
    • Brian Nielson
      I have a question for the group. I love beans. I eat them all the time, and I bought a bunch of beans for food storage. The problem is I can t cook them.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 3, 2003
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        I have a question for the group.
        I love beans. I eat them all the time, and I bought a bunch of beans for
        food storage. The problem is I can't cook them. Everytime I do, they come
        out kinda gritty, not nice and tender.
        I've tried the boil soak method and the long soak method. I think the
        problem might be that I cook them too long. I know we have some great bean
        cooking ability in the group, and I would love some help on this.
        Brian
      • ilfip
        Your beans sound stale. Beans go stale after a few months and don t cook up quite right anymore. There is hope, but it isn t in the dutch oven. The pressure
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 3, 2003
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          Your beans sound stale. Beans go stale after a few months and don't
          cook up quite right anymore. There is hope, but it isn't in the dutch
          oven. The pressure cooker can rescue these beans.

          Phil

          On Fri, 3 Jan 2003 18:31:14 -0600, you wrote:

          >I have a question for the group.
          >I love beans. I eat them all the time, and I bought a bunch of beans for
          >food storage. The problem is I can't cook them. Everytime I do, they come
          >out kinda gritty, not nice and tender.
          >I've tried the boil soak method and the long soak method. I think the
          >problem might be that I cook them too long. I know we have some great bean
          >cooking ability in the group, and I would love some help on this.
          >Brian
          >
          >
          >To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          >dutchovencooking-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          >
          >
          >
          >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
        • dutchovenben <benjammin@gtemail.net>
          Sounds like you might be using salt or baking soda in your beans, which can make them tough. Avoid using any salt with your beans while they are cooking. You
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 3, 2003
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            Sounds like you might be using salt or baking soda in your beans,
            which can make them tough. Avoid using any salt with your beans
            while they are cooking. You want beans to be cooking just above the
            simmer point, where the beans are moving round in the pot a little on
            their own. You want to reduce the heat to simmer as they start to
            burst so you don't wind up with bean porridge. I cook my beans like
            this (especially pintos) at least 4 to 6 hours. You might try
            anasazi beans, too. They are less dense than pintos and navy beans,
            and take less time to cook. I've never had beans go stale on me, but
            I keep them stored in airtight containers with no exposure to heat,
            moisture, or sunlight. If beans can go stale, it must take over a
            year, as I've seen people keep em in burlap in their root cellar that
            long without problems cooking them later. But anything is possible.



            --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Brian Nielson"
            <nielsons@a...> wrote:
            > I have a question for the group.
            > I love beans. I eat them all the time, and I bought a bunch of
            beans for
            > food storage. The problem is I can't cook them. Everytime I do,
            they come
            > out kinda gritty, not nice and tender.
            > I've tried the boil soak method and the long soak method. I think
            the
            > problem might be that I cook them too long. I know we have some
            great bean
            > cooking ability in the group, and I would love some help on this.
            > Brian
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