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Easter menu?

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  • Michael Warner
    Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she ll need. Before I open the big
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 1, 2009
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      Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she'll need. Before I open the big mouth and start to promise her ... if the main course is SPIRAL BAKED HAM (this is NY so we do it without Dr. Pepper), what are your suggestions for "Easter Sunday Like" menu items that can be done in the side yard in the black pot? Now remember, chili does not count as a side dish to a Yankee's Sunday Dinner.

      Any and all suggestions would be gratefully received.

      Mike in western NY
    • JULIE JORDAN
      Anything you would normally do in your oven!  Green Bean Casserole, Yams, Scalloped Potatoes, Dinner rolls, the possibilities are endless!!! Julie from San
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 1, 2009
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        Anything you would normally do in your oven!  Green Bean Casserole, Yams, Scalloped Potatoes, Dinner rolls, the possibilities are endless!!! Julie from San Berdoo.

        --- On Wed, 4/1/09, Michael Warner <mwarner51@...> wrote:

        From: Michael Warner <mwarner51@...>
        Subject: [dutchovencooking] Easter menu?
        To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Wednesday, April 1, 2009, 6:16 AM












        Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she'll need. Before I open the big mouth and start to promise her ... if the main course is SPIRAL BAKED HAM (this is NY so we do it without Dr. Pepper), what are your suggestions for "Easter Sunday Like" menu items that can be done in the side yard in the black pot? Now remember, chili does not count as a side dish to a Yankee's Sunday Dinner.



        Any and all suggestions would be gratefully received.



        Mike in western NY































        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ronda
        Our family likes the green bean & white corn casserole. Green Bean & White Corn Casserole (Fills a 9 x 13 baking dish) Ingredients: 2 cans French style green
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 1, 2009
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          Our family likes the green bean & white corn casserole.

          Green Bean & White Corn Casserole


          (Fills a 9 x 13 baking dish)

          Ingredients:
          2 cans French style green beans, drained
          2 cans white shoe peg corn, drained
          2 cans cream of celery soup
          1 onion, chopped
          1/2 green pepper, chopped
          1 can sliced water chestnuts
          Pepper to taste
          1 tube Ritz crackers, crushed
          1 stick butter or margarine

          Directions: Mix together everything except crackers and butter and put in baking dish. Melt butter and mix with crushed crackers. Sprinkle on top of vegetable mixture. Cover with foil and bake at 350 for an hour or so. May need to remove foil last few minutes to brown the cracker crumbs.

          Other optional "adds": chopped celery, slivered almonds.

          We use a 12" regular Ditch oven for this. We don't put the cracker crumbs on until about 45-60 minutes into the baking time. Add extra coals to the lid after putting the buttered cracker crumbs on top. I like to add slivered almonds to the cracker mixture also. I usually bake for an hour before adding the cracker crumb topping, then allow another 15 minutes or so for that. You can add cheese to the topping also, but our family prefers it without. Ronda

          --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Warner" <mwarner51@...> wrote:
          >
          > Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she'll need. Before I open the big mouth and start to promise her ... if the main course is SPIRAL BAKED HAM (this is NY so we do it without Dr. Pepper), what are your suggestions for "Easter Sunday Like" menu items that can be done in the side yard in the black pot? Now remember, chili does not count as a side dish to a Yankee's Sunday Dinner.
          >
          > Any and all suggestions would be gratefully received.
          >
          > Mike in western NY
          >
        • Ronda
          Oh, and you could do Vera s Squash Dressing. That s good stuff. I think Ken has that posted in his folder in the files section. Ronda
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 1, 2009
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            Oh, and you could do Vera's Squash Dressing. That's good stuff. I think Ken has that posted in his folder in the files section. Ronda

            --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Warner" <mwarner51@...> wrote:
            >
            > Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she'll need. Before I open the big mouth and start to promise her ... if the main course is SPIRAL BAKED HAM (this is NY so we do it without Dr. Pepper), what are your suggestions for "Easter Sunday Like" menu items that can be done in the side yard in the black pot? Now remember, chili does not count as a side dish to a Yankee's Sunday Dinner.
            >
            > Any and all suggestions would be gratefully received.
            >
            > Mike in western NY
            >
          • Ken Brown
            When I read the New York part, I thought I should look the recipe over to see if I needed to alter it for you. If you can t find the Mexican Style cornbread
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 1, 2009
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              When I read the New York part, I thought I should look the recipe over to see if I needed to alter it for you.

              If you can't find the Mexican Style cornbread mix, you can use regular and add a small (4 ounce) can of chopped green chili's. These give it some flavor, but they are not hot. If you want hot, use jalapeno's.

              I usually use frozen squash, and by the time I begin to cook, the squash has thawed.

              Ken


              Vera's Squash Dressing

              12 inch Dutch Oven, 350 degrees
              9 coals on the bottom
              15 coals on the top

              1 medium onion, chopped
              2 packages Mexican Style Cornbread Mix
              2 pounds fresh sliced squash, or 2 16-ounce packages of frozen squash
              1 small jar diced pimento
              1 cup grated cheese
              1 stick butter

              Sauté the chopped onion in the Dutch Oven, using half the stick of butter.
              In a large mixing bowl, mix the cornbread mix according to directions on the package. Add squash, pimento, cheese, and sautéed onion. Mix well.

              Heat the second half of the butter stick in the Dutch Oven, and coat the oven with it. Pour mixture into the Dutch Oven.

              Cook at 350 degrees for about one hour. Stir the dressing two or three times during cooking to make sure everything is cooked evenly.





              --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Ronda" <rlb_51@...> wrote:
              >
              > Oh, and you could do Vera's Squash Dressing. That's good stuff. I think Ken has that posted in his folder in the files section. Ronda
              >
              > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Warner" <mwarner51@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she'll need. Before I open the big mouth and start to promise her ... if the main course is SPIRAL BAKED HAM (this is NY so we do it without Dr. Pepper), what are your suggestions for "Easter Sunday Like" menu items that can be done in the side yard in the black pot? Now remember, chili does not count as a side dish to a Yankee's Sunday Dinner.
              > >
              > > Any and all suggestions would be gratefully received.
              > >
              > > Mike in western NY
              > >
              >
            • Fran L-G
              I haven t tried it myself, but always thought it would be a good large family gather side dish -- Funeral Potatoes , msg #23097. We do the French green bean
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 1, 2009
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                I haven't tried it myself, but always thought it would be a good large family gather side dish -- "Funeral Potatoes", msg #23097.

                We do the French green bean casserole plenty.

                Fran L-G
                Cleveland OH
              • Ken Brown
                We should probably ask some important questions here. How many pots do you have and how big are they? Also, how many people are you feeding? Remember my
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 1, 2009
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                  We should probably ask some important questions here. How many pots do you have and how big are they? Also, how many people are you feeding?

                  Remember my personal philosophy: "Life is short. Eat dessert first."

                  There are many dessert choices on the group.

                  As to other side dishes, I like green bean casserole. Glazed carrots is another idea which would go well with ham. Candied yams (Sweet 'taters) would be another good suggestion.

                  Breads, rolls, biscuits, etc.

                  I think you can see where I am going with this. This would be a really good time to go and buy another oven or two, and possibly another cooking table.

                  Ken


                  --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Warner" <mwarner51@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she'll need. Before I open the big mouth and start to promise her ... if the main course is SPIRAL BAKED HAM (this is NY so we do it without Dr. Pepper), what are your suggestions for "Easter Sunday Like" menu items that can be done in the side yard in the black pot? Now remember, chili does not count as a side dish to a Yankee's Sunday Dinner.
                  >
                  > Any and all suggestions would be gratefully received.
                  >
                  > Mike in western NY
                  >
                • Michael Warner
                  Ken wrote: ... we should probably ask some important questions here. How many pots do you have and how big are they? Three 12 . Two Lodge with feet (one new
                  Message 8 of 10 , Apr 2, 2009
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                    Ken wrote:
                    "... we should probably ask some important questions here. How many pots do you have and how big are they?"

                    Three 12". Two Lodge with feet (one new and still in the box - gotta get it cleaned). The Wenzel 12" is without feet and loves the oven.



                    "... also, how many people are you feeding?"

                    Looks like 10 family, maybe more, the number may be going up. Issue is we're pretty much cooking 2 full meals. One for the Republican/Conservative Carnivoires. One for the Democrat/Liberal Vegans (no meat, no fish, no dairy, no honey, etc. - try cooking without milk or cheese). The two year old is not registered politically but leans toward the carnivoire side.

                    Mike in NY
                    Western NY IDOS Chapter
                  • Stan Kowalski Jr.
                    ... (Sorry, this is NOT a DO meal) As an American of Polish descent, I was brought up with an Easter meal, heavily based on Palish, Catholic tradition. The
                    Message 9 of 10 , Apr 2, 2009
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                      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Warner" <mwarner51@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Got the clan coming over for Easter Sunday. Wife is looking at oven capacity and wondering if we can do everything that she'll need. Before I open the big mouth and start to promise her ... if the main course is SPIRAL BAKED HAM (this is NY so we do it without Dr. Pepper), what are your suggestions for "Easter Sunday Like" menu items that can be done in the side yard in the black pot? Now remember, chili does not count as a side dish to a Yankee's Sunday Dinner.
                      >
                      > Any and all suggestions would be gratefully received.
                      >
                      > Mike in western NY
                      >
                      (Sorry, this is NOT a DO meal)
                      As an American of Polish descent, I was brought up with an Easter meal, heavily based on Palish, Catholic tradition. The food was prepared in a basket on Holy Saturday, then taken to Church where it was blessed by the parish priest. The food was then shared by the family on Easter sunday, usually after attending the sunrise Mass of Ressurection. As my wife and I have gotten older, we now share this meal with our children and grandchildren after everyone attends the Mass of their choice and assembles at our home about 1 pm.

                      • The Baranek (Easter Lamb), made of butter or sugar (rock candy), but also of dough, wood, plaster, fleece or even plastic, symbolizes the sacrificial Paschal lamb, in other words Jesus himself, whose banner proclaims the victory of life over death.
                      • Easter eggs signify new life; just as a chick pecks its way out of its shell, so too Christ rose from His tomb to bring us the promise of eternal life.
                      • Bread, either a slice of ordinary rye bread or a special small round loaf imprinted with a cross,
                      symbolizes "the bread of life" - a metaphor for God's grace that sustains us.
                      • Meat and sausage are symbols of the Paschal lamb or Christ resurrected, His victory over death and His promise of eternal life.
                      • Horseradish is one of the bitter herbs of the Passover which foretold the suffering of Christ on the Cross. It is also symbolic of life in which one must accept the bitter with the sweet.
                      • Vinegar symbolizes the sour wine (our English word "vinegar" comes from the French "vin aigre" - sour wine) which Jesus was given on a sponge to drink while hanging on the cross.
                      • Salt symbolizes that which preserves us from corruption and adds zest to daily life.
                      • Cakes and sweets suggest the sweetness of eternal life: following weeks of Lenten self-denial, they can now be freely enjoyed in celebration of Christ's Resurrection. The cakes are usually something like a babka (or baba), or a placzek (a type of Polish coffee cake).

                      Stan Kowalski Jr.
                      Chapter Director
                      WNY Chapter IDOS
                    • Fran L-G
                      Wow Stan, for years I had been attending Easter at the in-laws and was served such fare (some of the relatives were from a neighborhood of Cleveland called
                      Message 10 of 10 , Apr 2, 2009
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                        Wow Stan, for years I had been attending Easter at the in-laws and was served such fare (some of the relatives were from a neighborhood of Cleveland called "Slovak Village"). Specifically there always had to be kielbasi & horseradish along with the ham. I never knew the symbolism behind every single food item (most it I could guess like the lamb) other than "it was good" :-)

                        Fran L-G
                        Cleveland OH

                        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Stan Kowalski Jr." <roverldr@...> wrote:
                        [snip]
                        > >
                        > (Sorry, this is NOT a DO meal)
                        > As an American of Polish descent, I was brought up with an Easter meal, heavily based on Palish, Catholic tradition. The food was prepared in a basket on Holy Saturday, then taken to Church where it was blessed by the parish priest. The food was then shared by the family on Easter sunday, usually after attending the sunrise Mass of Ressurection. As my wife and I have gotten older, we now share this meal with our children and grandchildren after everyone attends the Mass of their choice and assembles at our home about 1 pm.
                        >
                        > • The Baranek (Easter Lamb), made of butter or sugar (rock candy), but also of dough, wood, plaster, fleece or even plastic, symbolizes the sacrificial Paschal lamb, in other words Jesus himself, whose banner proclaims the victory of life over death.
                        > • Easter eggs signify new life; just as a chick pecks its way out of its shell, so too Christ rose from His tomb to bring us the promise of eternal life.
                        > • Bread, either a slice of ordinary rye bread or a special small round loaf imprinted with a cross,
                        > symbolizes "the bread of life" - a metaphor for God's grace that sustains us.
                        > • Meat and sausage are symbols of the Paschal lamb or Christ resurrected, His victory over death and His promise of eternal life.
                        > • Horseradish is one of the bitter herbs of the Passover which foretold the suffering of Christ on the Cross. It is also symbolic of life in which one must accept the bitter with the sweet.
                        > • Vinegar symbolizes the sour wine (our English word "vinegar" comes from the French "vin aigre" - sour wine) which Jesus was given on a sponge to drink while hanging on the cross.
                        > • Salt symbolizes that which preserves us from corruption and adds zest to daily life.
                        > • Cakes and sweets suggest the sweetness of eternal life: following weeks of Lenten self-denial, they can now be freely enjoyed in celebration of Christ's Resurrection. The cakes are usually something like a babka (or baba), or a placzek (a type of Polish coffee cake).
                        >
                        > Stan Kowalski Jr.
                        > Chapter Director
                        > WNY Chapter IDOS
                        >
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