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RE: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: history of the Dutch Oven

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  • Matt m
    I have read that the Dutch part came from the peddlers, who were generally Deutsch, or German and from the Pennsylvania colony. I also read, probably in an
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 30, 2002
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      I have read that the Dutch part came from the peddlers, who were
      generally Deutsch, or German and from the Pennsylvania colony. I also
      read, probably in an IDOS newsletter, that the colonial metal smith (and
      midnight rider) Paul Revere is generally credited with the addition of
      the legs.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Barbara Wilkins [mailto:barb7513@...]
      Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 11:45 AM
      To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: history of the Dutch Oven

      A Brief History of Dutch Ovens

      Note: For an in depth history of the name "Dutch Oven"
      and the cast iron oven called a "Dutch Oven" I suggest
      the book "Dutch Ovens Chronicled, Their Use in the
      United States" by John G. Ragsdale, published by the
      University of Arkansas Press. This book can be
      purchased from Barnes and Noble.

      According to Ragsdale the name Dutch Oven has been
      applied to a variety of cooking pots, kettles, and
      ovens over the years. The origin of the name, "Dutch
      Oven", is uncertain but Ragsdale suggests a few
      theories.

      1. In 1704 a man by the name of Abraham Darby
      traveled from England to Holland to inspect a Dutch
      casting process by which brass vessels where cast in
      dry sand molds. Upon returning to England Darby
      experimented with the process and eventually patented
      a casting process using a better type of molding sand
      as well as a process of baking the mold to improve
      casting smoothness. Darby eventually began casting
      pots and shipping them to the new colonies and
      throughout the world. Ragsdale suggests that the name
      "Dutch Oven" may have derived from the original Dutch
      process for casting metal pots.

      2. Others have suggested that early Dutch traders or
      salesmen peddling cast iron pots may have given rise
      to the name "Dutch Oven".

      3. Still others believe that the name came from Dutch
      settlers in the Pennsylvania area who used similar
      cast iron pots or kettles.

      To this day the name "Dutch Oven" is applied to
      various cast pots or kettles. The most common
      application of the name is to a cast iron pot or
      kettle with a flat bottom having three legs to hold
      the oven above the coals, flat sides and a flat,
      flanged lid for holding coals. These ovens have a
      steel bail handle attached to "ears" on each side of
      the oven near the top for carrying.

      Other ovens may also be called a "Dutch Oven" such as
      cast aluminum Dutch ovens and cast iron pots or
      kettles with rounded lids, flat bottoms and no legs.

      Lodge Manufacturing Company which makes the majority
      of Dutch Ovens being sold today, distinguished the two
      types of ovens by calling the rounded top, flat bottom
      oven with no legs, a Dutch Oven. The oven with a flat
      lid with a lip around the edge and a flat bottom with
      three legs they call a "Camp Oven".

      Ragsdale indicates that cast metal pots have been in
      use since the seventh century. The Dutch Oven of
      today has evolved over the years as various
      manufacturers made refinements and improvements over
      previous version of cast metal pots.

      The shape of the "ears" has evolved as has the length
      and thickness of the legs. The lid also has seen many
      changes ranging from rounded to flat and from no lip
      to various shapes of lips or flanges.

      No matter what you call it or what shape it is cast
      to, a well prepared meal from a Dutch Oven has a
      delicious flavor unmatched by most other cookware.


      --- C JONES <cjinblack2000@...> wrote:
      > where did the frist Dutch Oven come from?



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    • Tom T.
      Can t pass this one up......an iron foundry! Tom C JONES wrote:where did the frist Dutch Oven come from? To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 30, 2002
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        Can't pass this one up......an iron foundry!
        Tom
        C JONES wrote:where did the frist Dutch Oven come from?




        To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
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      • altapig2
        You are right on course. Infact the Dutch Traders brought the pots to America & to Africa. If you look at the American Dutch Oven, and the African Potjie, you
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 27, 2002
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          You are right on course. Infact the Dutch Traders brought the pots to
          America & to Africa. If you look at the American Dutch Oven, and the
          African Potjie, you will see how they have evolved. The Dutch Oven for
          use on Hearths, Fire Places, & Camp Coals, and the Potjie for use over
          camp fires. Infact the Dutch Oven was hung from the axles of Covered
          Wagons & Hand Carts of the pioneers as they traveled across America.
          Another reasons for the shorter legs.
          Good Luck With Your Cookin & Keep Your Coals Hot. JeffC

          --- In dutchovencooking@y..., Matt m <mattm@a...> wrote:
          > I have read that the Dutch part came from the peddlers, who were
          > generally Deutsch, or German and from the Pennsylvania colony. I also
          > read, probably in an IDOS newsletter, that the colonial metal smith (and
          > midnight rider) Paul Revere is generally credited with the addition of
          > the legs.
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Barbara Wilkins [mailto:barb7513@y...]
          > Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 11:45 AM
          > To: dutchovencooking@y...
          > Subject: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: history of the Dutch Oven
          >
          > A Brief History of Dutch Ovens
          >
          > Note: For an in depth history of the name "Dutch Oven"
          > and the cast iron oven called a "Dutch Oven" I suggest
          > the book "Dutch Ovens Chronicled, Their Use in the
          > United States" by John G. Ragsdale, published by the
          > University of Arkansas Press. This book can be
          > purchased from Barnes and Noble.
          >
          > According to Ragsdale the name Dutch Oven has been
          > applied to a variety of cooking pots, kettles, and
          > ovens over the years. The origin of the name, "Dutch
          > Oven", is uncertain but Ragsdale suggests a few
          > theories.
          >
          > 1. In 1704 a man by the name of Abraham Darby
          > traveled from England to Holland to inspect a Dutch
          > casting process by which brass vessels where cast in
          > dry sand molds. Upon returning to England Darby
          > experimented with the process and eventually patented
          > a casting process using a better type of molding sand
          > as well as a process of baking the mold to improve
          > casting smoothness. Darby eventually began casting
          > pots and shipping them to the new colonies and
          > throughout the world. Ragsdale suggests that the name
          > "Dutch Oven" may have derived from the original Dutch
          > process for casting metal pots.
          >
          > 2. Others have suggested that early Dutch traders or
          > salesmen peddling cast iron pots may have given rise
          > to the name "Dutch Oven".
          >
          > 3. Still others believe that the name came from Dutch
          > settlers in the Pennsylvania area who used similar
          > cast iron pots or kettles.
          >
          > To this day the name "Dutch Oven" is applied to
          > various cast pots or kettles. The most common
          > application of the name is to a cast iron pot or
          > kettle with a flat bottom having three legs to hold
          > the oven above the coals, flat sides and a flat,
          > flanged lid for holding coals. These ovens have a
          > steel bail handle attached to "ears" on each side of
          > the oven near the top for carrying.
          >
          > Other ovens may also be called a "Dutch Oven" such as
          > cast aluminum Dutch ovens and cast iron pots or
          > kettles with rounded lids, flat bottoms and no legs.
          >
          > Lodge Manufacturing Company which makes the majority
          > of Dutch Ovens being sold today, distinguished the two
          > types of ovens by calling the rounded top, flat bottom
          > oven with no legs, a Dutch Oven. The oven with a flat
          > lid with a lip around the edge and a flat bottom with
          > three legs they call a "Camp Oven".
          >
          > Ragsdale indicates that cast metal pots have been in
          > use since the seventh century. The Dutch Oven of
          > today has evolved over the years as various
          > manufacturers made refinements and improvements over
          > previous version of cast metal pots.
          >
          > The shape of the "ears" has evolved as has the length
          > and thickness of the legs. The lid also has seen many
          > changes ranging from rounded to flat and from no lip
          > to various shapes of lips or flanges.
          >
          > No matter what you call it or what shape it is cast
          > to, a well prepared meal from a Dutch Oven has a
          > delicious flavor unmatched by most other cookware.
          >
          >
          > --- C JONES <cjinblack2000@y...> wrote:
          > > where did the frist Dutch Oven come from?
          >
          >
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do you Yahoo!?
          > New DSL Internet Access from SBC & Yahoo!
          > http://sbc.yahoo.com
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
          >
          >
          > ADVERTISEMENT
          >
          > <http://rd.yahoo.com/M=228592.2410742.3832075.1456768/D=egroupweb/S=1707
          > 744224:HM/A=1238703/R=4/id=noscript/*http:/shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/
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          > ttp://www.gevalia.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.gevalia.com/gevalia/cont
          > inuity/keycode.jsp%3Fkeycode=199513>
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          >
          >
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          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • altapig2
          You are right on course. Infact the Dutch Traders brought the pots to America & to Africa. If you look at the American Dutch Oven, and the African Potjie, you
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 27, 2002
          • 0 Attachment
            You are right on course. Infact the Dutch Traders brought the pots to
            America & to Africa. If you look at the American Dutch Oven, and the
            African Potjie, you will see how they have evolved. The Dutch Oven for
            use on Hearths, Fire Places, & Camp Coals, and the Potjie for use over
            camp fires. Infact the Dutch Oven was hung from the axles of Covered
            Wagons & Hand Carts of the pioneers as they traveled across America.
            Another reasons for the shorter legs.
            Good Luck With Your Cookin & Keep Your Coals Hot. JeffC

            --- In dutchovencooking@y..., Matt m <mattm@a...> wrote:
            > I have read that the Dutch part came from the peddlers, who were
            > generally Deutsch, or German and from the Pennsylvania colony. I also
            > read, probably in an IDOS newsletter, that the colonial metal smith (and
            > midnight rider) Paul Revere is generally credited with the addition of
            > the legs.
            >
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Barbara Wilkins [mailto:barb7513@y...]
            > Sent: Monday, September 30, 2002 11:45 AM
            > To: dutchovencooking@y...
            > Subject: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: history of the Dutch Oven
            >
            > A Brief History of Dutch Ovens
            >
            > Note: For an in depth history of the name "Dutch Oven"
            > and the cast iron oven called a "Dutch Oven" I suggest
            > the book "Dutch Ovens Chronicled, Their Use in the
            > United States" by John G. Ragsdale, published by the
            > University of Arkansas Press. This book can be
            > purchased from Barnes and Noble.
            >
            > According to Ragsdale the name Dutch Oven has been
            > applied to a variety of cooking pots, kettles, and
            > ovens over the years. The origin of the name, "Dutch
            > Oven", is uncertain but Ragsdale suggests a few
            > theories.
            >
            > 1. In 1704 a man by the name of Abraham Darby
            > traveled from England to Holland to inspect a Dutch
            > casting process by which brass vessels where cast in
            > dry sand molds. Upon returning to England Darby
            > experimented with the process and eventually patented
            > a casting process using a better type of molding sand
            > as well as a process of baking the mold to improve
            > casting smoothness. Darby eventually began casting
            > pots and shipping them to the new colonies and
            > throughout the world. Ragsdale suggests that the name
            > "Dutch Oven" may have derived from the original Dutch
            > process for casting metal pots.
            >
            > 2. Others have suggested that early Dutch traders or
            > salesmen peddling cast iron pots may have given rise
            > to the name "Dutch Oven".
            >
            > 3. Still others believe that the name came from Dutch
            > settlers in the Pennsylvania area who used similar
            > cast iron pots or kettles.
            >
            > To this day the name "Dutch Oven" is applied to
            > various cast pots or kettles. The most common
            > application of the name is to a cast iron pot or
            > kettle with a flat bottom having three legs to hold
            > the oven above the coals, flat sides and a flat,
            > flanged lid for holding coals. These ovens have a
            > steel bail handle attached to "ears" on each side of
            > the oven near the top for carrying.
            >
            > Other ovens may also be called a "Dutch Oven" such as
            > cast aluminum Dutch ovens and cast iron pots or
            > kettles with rounded lids, flat bottoms and no legs.
            >
            > Lodge Manufacturing Company which makes the majority
            > of Dutch Ovens being sold today, distinguished the two
            > types of ovens by calling the rounded top, flat bottom
            > oven with no legs, a Dutch Oven. The oven with a flat
            > lid with a lip around the edge and a flat bottom with
            > three legs they call a "Camp Oven".
            >
            > Ragsdale indicates that cast metal pots have been in
            > use since the seventh century. The Dutch Oven of
            > today has evolved over the years as various
            > manufacturers made refinements and improvements over
            > previous version of cast metal pots.
            >
            > The shape of the "ears" has evolved as has the length
            > and thickness of the legs. The lid also has seen many
            > changes ranging from rounded to flat and from no lip
            > to various shapes of lips or flanges.
            >
            > No matter what you call it or what shape it is cast
            > to, a well prepared meal from a Dutch Oven has a
            > delicious flavor unmatched by most other cookware.
            >
            >
            > --- C JONES <cjinblack2000@y...> wrote:
            > > where did the frist Dutch Oven come from?
            >
            >
            >
            > __________________________________________________
            > Do you Yahoo!?
            > New DSL Internet Access from SBC & Yahoo!
            > http://sbc.yahoo.com
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
            >
            >
            > ADVERTISEMENT
            >
            > <http://rd.yahoo.com/M=228592.2410742.3832075.1456768/D=egroupweb/S=1707
            > 744224:HM/A=1238703/R=4/id=noscript/*http:/shop.store.yahoo.com/cgi-bin/
            > clink?gevalia2+shopping:dmad/M=228592.2410742.3832075.1456768/D=egroupwe
            > b/S=1707744224:HM/A=1238703/R=5/1033411474+http://us.rmi.yahoo.com/rmi/h
            > ttp://www.gevalia.com/rmi-framed-url/http://www.gevalia.com/gevalia/cont
            > inuity/keycode.jsp%3Fkeycode=199513>
            >
            >
            > <http://us.a1.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/a/1-/flash/kraft/gev_lrg_rct_300x250_
            > 30k.jpg>
            >
            >
            > <http://us.adserver.yahoo.com/l?M=228592.2410742.3832075.1456768/D=egrou
            > pmail/S=:HM/A=1238703/rand=219646784>
            >
            > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
            > dutchovencooking-unsubscribe@y...
            >
            >
            >
            > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
            > <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Service.
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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