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Re: [Dutch Oven Cooking] Re: to glove or not........

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  • Charcin
    Becuse it has been proven over time that golves tend to make a person less careful in sanitation practices. Folks tend to get a false sense of cleanliness with
    Message 1 of 31 , May 1, 2008
      Becuse it has been proven over time that golves tend to make a person less careful in sanitation practices.

      Folks tend to get a false sense of cleanliness with gloves, and start thinking.......If I have gloves on, I can handle food, and not think so much about what else they handle. Folks tend to get into the thinking that gloves are keeping their hands clean, and not that they are protecting the food from their hands and germs!
      Also....If you don't have gloves, you are more likely to wash your hands much more often!

      BTW....I am also an ER nurse and an EMT, and we see the same problems with gloves not being changed enough in medical situations as well!

      Cin

      Black Pot Demo's
      www.blackpotdemos.com

      Cook 'N Camp
      www.cookncamp.com



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: B. Anderson
      To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Thursday, May 01, 2008 3:08 PM
      Subject: Re: [Dutch Oven Cooking] Re: to glove or not........


      "Clean good handwashing is much better than dirty gloves any day!"

      Both clean handwashing and clean gloves are the best. Why does everyone assume that gloves are dirty??? Not everyone goes around touching stuff with their gloves, unless they are ignorant.

      Corona~Barb

      ---------------------------------
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    • Wally and Pat
      Hi all, When I was in nursing school years ago, we spent what seemed like forever learning proper handwashing techniques. The Centers for Disease Control
      Message 31 of 31 , May 4, 2008
        Hi all,

        When I was in nursing school years ago, we spent what seemed like
        forever learning proper handwashing techniques. The Centers for Disease
        Control hasn't really changed those. Here are some key takeaways that I
        still use:
        - Friction is one of the most important parts of handwashing. You need
        to use friction to free the dirt from your hands, as the best soap in
        the world can't work without friction. And you need to scrub your hands
        for about 20 seconds, not just rub the soap over all surfaces once.
        - Rinse your hands in clean running water. It doesn't have to be warm
        or hot. The heated water just helps release the soap faster, and feels
        better. The main thing is that it is running water so that all residue
        and soap are rinsed off.
        - Be sure to pay attention to your cuticles and under your fingernails,
        as they are crevices that harbor dirt and bacteria. You don't need a
        brush, just use your own fingernails to clean under one another.
        - Antibacterial soaps are fine, but as long as you follow the above,
        then a biodegradable soap is just as good. (Plain old soap and good
        handwashing gets rid of most bacteria that we'd come in contact with).
        - Finally, remember that people's hands are dirty when they handle the
        can or water knob or whateverthe water source may be, so you will pick
        up the same bacteria on your hands if you touch it after washing your
        hands. So use a clean, dry towel to turn off the water to keep from
        recontaminating your hands after washing them.

        The garden hose is another story. We all drank from garden hoses when
        we were little, but now health groups advise against it because
        bacteria love to grow in the dark, wet environment of garden hoses, as
        they have stagnant water and access to soil. So our garden hoses are
        loaded with bacteria. And they also pick up fertilizers, pesticides,
        and other gunk that are in the soil. It would be better to fill up
        directly from the faucet after letting it run for a couple of seconds.

        Now I'm going to go back to lurking, and hope that you don't all think
        I'm a clean freak. <grin>

        Pat in Birmingham
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