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Rust on pan ?

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  • mountainfern
    I bought a Lodge deep frying pan from a thrift store that looked to be in great condition. Washed in hot water with scrubber only and then dried over gas flame
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 7, 2007
      I bought a Lodge deep frying pan from a thrift store that looked to be
      in great condition. Washed in hot water with scrubber only and then
      dried over gas flame on the stove. I was then going to apply olive oil
      and season it in the oven, but it has a rust type cast all around the
      sides, after drying throughly over the open flame. Is this rust? Is
      this pan salvedgable? Any suggestions appreciated.

      Stacye
    • Marshall
      Take a look in the photo section at Rusty Spider to see how a oven that was recently given me cleaned up.. If its not too pitted it is salvageable. Marshall
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 7, 2007
        Take a look in the photo section at "Rusty Spider" to see how a oven
        that was recently given me cleaned up.. If its not too pitted it is
        salvageable.
        Marshall


        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "mountainfern"
        <FernsAndNettles@...> wrote:
        >
        > I bought a Lodge deep frying pan...
      • mountainfern
        My pan has no pits and has only a light coating of rust on the inner side and bottom of pan. May I ask what was you way of removing all of this rust on your
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 9, 2007
          My pan has no pits and has only a light coating of rust on the inner
          side and bottom of pan. May I ask what was you way of removing all of
          this rust on your pan?

          Stacye


          --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Marshall" <m_l_hawkes@...>
          wrote:

          > Take a look in the photo section at "Rusty Spider" to see how a oven
          > that was recently given me cleaned up.. If its not too pitted it is
          > salvageable.
          > Marshall

          > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "mountainfern"
          > <FernsAndNettles@> wrote:

          > > I bought a Lodge deep frying pan...
          >
        • Fran L-G
          ... Stacye, If you have rust appearing, then your iron no longer has the seasoning on that part of the metal. You will need to re-season your iron. It is
          Message 4 of 6 , Jan 9, 2007
            --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "mountainfern"
            <FernsAndNettles@...> wrote:
            >
            > I bought a Lodge deep frying pan from a thrift store that looked to be
            > in great condition. Washed in hot water with scrubber only and then
            > dried over gas flame on the stove. I was then going to apply olive oil
            > and season it in the oven, but it has a rust type cast all around the
            > sides, after drying throughly over the open flame. Is this rust? Is
            > this pan salvedgable? Any suggestions appreciated.
            >
            > Stacye

            Stacye,

            If you have rust appearing, then your iron no longer has the seasoning
            on that part of the metal. You will need to re-season your iron.

            It is possible that this rust is just a light coating of surface rust
            on unseasoned iron, which can occur right in front of your eyes when
            the air is slightly humid. Not much you can do when the conditions
            are so, other than reduce the time the iron sits without a protective
            coating of oil. You'd have to apply the oil as soon as you think the
            iron is warm & dry enough rather than wait too long.

            But on the other hand, maybe it is more than just surface rust. To
            cover your bases, try this: soak your rusted iron in a vinegar-water
            solution for a few hours, lightly scrubbing as you check it every so
            often. I've soaked a really rusty pot about 9 hours total with great
            results, others have done as much as a couple of days, some got by
            with less. The point is, this vinegar-water solution can eventually
            eat at the iron so you don't just want to leave the iron in the soak &
            forget about it.

            The solution can be 50:50 vinegar to water; I was able to get results
            with 1:4 vinegar to water because I didn't have that much vinegar on
            hand. And I just used the cheaper white vinegar instead of the more
            expensive cider vinegar too. Maybe if it was a stronger solution, it
            may have taken a shorter amount of time, but it didn't matter to me,
            as it still allowed me to thoroughly check the condition of the iron
            over time, especially as this was an older Wagner piece. It was also
            hard finding a big non-reactive container to soak my pot in, like
            steel or plastic; someone else used a clean garbage can (Hi Kathy!),
            something to keep in mind.

            After the vinegar solution, rinse thoroughly. The Pan Man
            (http://www.panman.com) further recommends that you neutralize any
            remaining vinegar with a soak in a baking soda solution, but I think
            just a good hot water rinse will do.

            To dry, my favorite method is to put it in the kitchen oven at 200F
            for about 10-20 minutes. Not much harm can happen if you forget it in
            the oven, unlike on top of the stove burner. If there is still very
            light rust, I would just still continue -- this may be the surface
            rust that you can't beat in appearing, so just cover it up. Then while
            the iron is still hot, apply oil (I prefer melted Crisco) to the
            piece, taking care to wipe up any excess pooling, and then bake upside
            down in the kitchen oven for about an hour at 425-450F. This will
            generate a lot of smoke, so make sure you can open your windows &
            doors. Allow the iron to cool somewhat, even slightly warm is OK,
            then re-apply the oil and repeat at least 3 more times. If you let
            the iron cool down between the seasoning sessions, just re-heat before
            applying the seasoning agent (melted Crisco) -- the oil will apply
            much more smoothly. Multiple seasoning sessions will give you a good
            start on achieving a glossy black patina. The more you do it, the
            closer it gets to almost teflon-like.

            Then on occasion after use, I will still do mini-seasoning sessions to
            the iron -- after washing, dry in the oven, apply melted Crisco, bake
            at 425F for 30 minutes, then store. I like this method because not
            only it gives a face-lift to the patina, but the iron is not greasy
            when put away.

            Hope this helps.


            Fran L-G
            Cleveland OH
          • Marshall
            I soak it in Coca Cola for a while, then scrub with a scrubbie. That will get a lot off. Maybe touch up with light sandpaper. Then I re-season it 3-4 times.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jan 9, 2007
              I soak it in Coca Cola for a while, then scrub with a scrubbie. That
              will get a lot off. Maybe touch up with light sandpaper. Then I
              re-season it 3-4 times. I heat it in an outdoor gas bar-b-cue to save
              smoking up the house.
              Even if it is pitted you can still use it for baking and roasting. It
              just may never again have that smooth non-slick surface.
              Marshall


              --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "mountainfern"
              <FernsAndNettles@...> wrote:
              >
              > My pan has no pits and has only a light coating of rust on the inner
              > side and bottom of pan. May I ask what was you way of removing all of
              > this rust on your pan?
              >
              > Stacye
              >
            • mountainfern
              Thanks for all the replies ~ I just moved (residence) over the weekend and just got the computer back up. I haven t tried anything further with the pan yet,
              Message 6 of 6 , Jan 16, 2007
                Thanks for all the replies ~ I just moved (residence) over the weekend
                and just got the computer back up.

                I haven't tried anything further with the pan yet, will have to wait a
                week or two now, but hopefully will work. The rust is only at the
                point where the sides go up and up the sides. The black patina (?)
                still exists on the bottom of the pan.

                After I scrubbed it last time,thinking I must have gotten off the
                rust, I set it over the stove gas flame to dry but the rust
                immediately re-appeared. Will try the methods listed here and hope for
                better luck!

                Thanks again, Stacye

                --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "mountainfern"
                <FernsAndNettles@...> wrote:
                >
                > I bought a Lodge deep frying pan from a thrift store that looked to be
                > in great condition. Washed in hot water with scrubber only and then
                > dried over gas flame on the stove. I was then going to apply olive oil
                > and season it in the oven, but it has a rust type cast all around the
                > sides, after drying throughly over the open flame. Is this rust? Is
                > this pan salvedgable? Any suggestions appreciated.
                >
                > Stacye
                >
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