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building wooden boxes for dutch ovens

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  • gatoreye2000
    Hey all! I am thinking of building some wooden boxes for my two dutch ovens and wonder if anyone has any pointers or tips. I have seen the commercially built
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 22, 2006
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      Hey all!

      I am thinking of building some wooden boxes for my two dutch ovens and
      wonder if anyone has any pointers or tips.

      I have seen the commercially built ones where the lid goes in the
      bottom of the box followed by the oven and I will probably follow
      that idea.

      But I wonder if i need to allow a bit extra space for padding if my
      oven goes in the box that way. The ovens will be traveling in the back
      end of my teardrop trailer and I am looking for the best way to
      protect them from damage.
      With my building skills they will certainly be functional but not
      pretty.

      Anyone have any thoughts about this?

      Thanks everyone.

      Walter


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Ronda
      I guess you could say our DO boxes are functional but not pretty also. Doug makes them out of scrap plywood that he gets from the scrap pile at work. I
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 22, 2006
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        I guess you could say our DO boxes are functional but not pretty
        also. Doug makes them out of scrap plywood that he gets from the
        scrap pile at work. I haven't seen any of the commercially built
        ones.

        The only thing I'll say is that they need to have some holes in the
        side for air flow. Doug just did an oval on each side of the box so
        they're easy to carry, plus allow the air to get through. On the
        outside of the box I stenciled what size oven it was, just so I
        don't have to open the lid to know what's in there.

        We didn't do anything as far as cushioning ours, but I have seen
        some that were lined with felt or carpet. We carry ours in the back
        of the truck or inside the camper and haven't had any problems.
        Ronda

        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, gatoreye2000 <no_reply@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > Hey all!
        >
        > I am thinking of building some wooden boxes for my two dutch ovens
        and
        > wonder if anyone has any pointers or tips.
        >
        > I have seen the commercially built ones where the lid goes in the
        > bottom of the box followed by the oven and I will probably follow
        > that idea.
        >
        > But I wonder if i need to allow a bit extra space for padding if my
        > oven goes in the box that way. The ovens will be traveling in the
        back
        > end of my teardrop trailer and I am looking for the best way to
        > protect them from damage.
        > With my building skills they will certainly be functional but not
        > pretty.
        >
        > Anyone have any thoughts about this?
        >
        > Thanks everyone.
        >
        > Walter
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
      • akehurstm
        My boxes are made of cedar, which helps with moisture. On each side there are two holes which is used for the rope handles. I have no other holes. My box is
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 26, 2006
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          My boxes are made of cedar, which helps with moisture. On each side
          there are two holes which is used for the rope handles. I have no
          other holes. My box is not padded.

          I have "accidentally" rolled the whole box (oven included) down two
          flights of stairs. As most of use would I dropped to my knees and
          watched my beloved oven roll down in slow motion. I knew it had to be
          broken in tiny pieces on the concrete below. I couldn't look, I sent
          someone else to pick it. They picked up the box, and what lay
          underneath was heartstopping. One whole dutch oven. Not a crack, not a
          ding. The box took the beating for the oven. A canvas bag could not do
          that for you. From that point on, I realized there was no better way
          to store an oven.
        • Doug McGee
          I ve made a couple of boxes for my ovens. I didn t use cedar but have access to lots of used pallets and ripped a couple of them apart and used that free
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 26, 2006
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            I've made a couple of boxes for my ovens. I didn't use cedar but
            have access to lots of used pallets and ripped a couple of them
            apart and used that free lumber for my boxes. I still have several
            more to make.

            If you have access to free used pallets, many of the heavier ones
            are maple or oak and are good hardwood that are much more
            weather resistant than pine or fir.

            I don't have any kind of padding inside my boxes either. I custom
            make each box to specifically fit each oven and don't leave much,
            if any, room for the oven to "rattle" around inside the box. I also
            drill 2 holes on each side for a rope handle.

            Doug


            On 9/26/06, akehurstm <akehurstm@...> wrote:
            >
            > My boxes are made of cedar, which helps with moisture. On each side
            > there are two holes which is used for the rope handles. I have no
            > other holes. My box is not padded.
            >
            > I have "accidentally" rolled the whole box (oven included) down two
            > flights of stairs. As most of use would I dropped to my knees and
            > watched my beloved oven roll down in slow motion. I knew it had to be
            > broken in tiny pieces on the concrete below. I couldn't look, I sent
            > someone else to pick it. They picked up the box, and what lay
            > underneath was heartstopping. One whole dutch oven. Not a crack, not a
            > ding. The box took the beating for the oven. A canvas bag could not do
            > that for you. From that point on, I realized there was no better way
            > to store an oven.
            >
            >
            >



            --



            --
            Life should not be a journey to the grave
            with the intention of arriving safely in
            an attractive and well preserved body, but
            rather to skid in sideways, thoroughly used
            up, totally worn out, and screaming
            "Woo Hoo -- What A Ride!"
            --------------------------------
            Out the modem, through the POP,
            down the T1, off the router, down
            the OC3...nothin' but Net.
            --------------------------------
            Name: Doug McGee
            E-mail: mcgeed2001@...


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • hooknhackler
            Bouncing around in a trailer, the lid will take a beating if you put your oven on top of the lid. I designed my boxes with a spacer that keeps the lid from
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 27, 2006
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              Bouncing around in a trailer, the lid will take a beating if you put your oven on top of the
              lid.

              I designed my boxes with a spacer that keeps the lid from touching the oven below.
              Simply cut triangular shaped braces for each corner of the box. These should be slightly
              higher than the oven. A 1/4" or 3/8" plywood spacer fits into the box and rests on top of
              these 4 corner braces (the plywood spacer can double as a trivet to keep hot ovens off the
              table). The lid goes on top of the spacer.

              As for your construction, if these corner braces are glued and screwed it really makes a
              tough DO box.

              Good luck!
            • gatoreye2000
              I hadnt thought of the spacer thingie.......sounds like a great idea. I want the ovens to fit tight in the boxes so they cant move at all. Lots of plywood left
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 27, 2006
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                I hadnt thought of the spacer thingie.......sounds like a great idea.
                I want the ovens to fit tight in the boxes so they cant move at all.
                Lots of plywood left over from the trailer build so doing a spacer
                will be easy!
                Thanks everyone.
                lots of great ideas here. (as always)
                Walter

                --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "hooknhackler" <tac36@...> wrote:
                >
                > Bouncing around in a trailer, the lid will take a beating if you put
                your oven on top of the
                > lid.
                >
                > I designed my boxes with a spacer that keeps the lid from touching
                the oven below.
                > Simply cut triangular shaped braces for each corner of the box.
                These should be slightly
                > higher than the oven. A 1/4" or 3/8" plywood spacer fits into the
                box and rests on top of
                > these 4 corner braces (the plywood spacer can double as a trivet to
                keep hot ovens off the
                > table). The lid goes on top of the spacer.
                >
                > As for your construction, if these corner braces are glued and
                screwed it really makes a
                > tough DO box.
                >
                > Good luck!
                >
              • Richard Holland
                ... The two ovens that I got from Lodge had the lid on the bottom. Next a spacer to keep the legs from resting on the lid and then the oven. The box/carton
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 29, 2006
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                  --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, gatoreye2000 <no_reply@...>
                  wrote:
                  >
                  > I hadnt thought of the spacer thingie.......sounds like a great idea.
                  > >

                  The two ovens that I got from Lodge had the lid on the bottom.
                  Next a spacer to keep the legs from resting on the lid and then the
                  oven. The box/carton opened to the side.

                  The biggest advantage I see is a slightly lower box for shipping
                  purposes.

                  I've had no problems with the boxes but cardboard will not last
                  as long as the ovens.

                  Richard Holland
                  Houston, Texas
                • Kathy
                  - Richard, Card board boxes don t last too long especially if you get caught in a downfall of rain like we did last year at Sheffield Ohio. I ended up going
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 30, 2006
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                    -
                    Richard,

                    Card board boxes don't last too long especially if you get caught in
                    a downfall of rain like we did last year at Sheffield Ohio. I ended
                    up going back to Gander Mountian and buying some of their carrying
                    cases for Dutchovens, about $8.00 each on sale. I like them .
                    I've also tried making me a few. I bought some heavy fabic and just
                    measured and got them to look half way decent, one for a 12" habor
                    frieght and one for an 8" Lodge. For carrying straps I used some
                    left over tie down strapping. Works good, nice and sturdy.

                    My best deal though was at a yard sale I bought what I think is a
                    bowling bag with wheels for $1. I put my 12" lodge in it and my 8"
                    lodge inside the 12". Works great, lift the handle and wheel them
                    to the car.

                    My back is not letting me lift and carry to much lately so even the
                    carrying case for the stove has wheels and the shelter case too.

                    I even keep a small wheel luggage carrier handy to move stuff like
                    old heavy sewing machines in the basement too.

                    bye for now,
                    mamabear-kathy
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