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Re: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: sourdough biscuts (Art Perry's

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  • Danny
    Pump Doc, I have seen this potato thing a few places, do you just leave the potato in the starter for ever? If I understand it you peel, quarter and place in
    Message 1 of 15 , Oct 1, 2005
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      Pump Doc,

      I have seen this potato thing a few places, do you just leave the potato in the starter for ever? If I understand it you peel, quarter and place in the starter, in chucks? What does it do for it anyway?

      Dan
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: AllenJ.
      To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2005 8:42 PM
      Subject: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: sourdough biscuts (Art Perry's


      Dan, I scanned this from an old Arizona Highways Cookbook a friend
      had, and which I bought a copy of on Half.com . The starter is
      easy to make and maintain. It is a mild starter and also gets
      active real quick when you get out to use it. The biscuit recipe is
      below it. I am cooking a batch tomorrow with an alternate heat
      source. I have a sourdough coffee cake that is just right for the
      10" when you are ready ---- enjoy the recipe and your new hobby.

      AllenJ. --- Pump Doc

      ******************************************************

      Art Perry's Sourdough Starter-

      ArtPerry was born in Flagstaff, could carve a willow whistle and do
      bird calls, and knew the best of outdoor cooking secrets, starting
      with sourdough. His sourdough starter went all ways. Beat in a
      couple of eggs and you've got everyday pancakes. Add sweet corn cut
      off the cob to make corn oysters. Add a little sugar, milk, and soda
      and the result is fancy Sunday pancakes.

      To make sourdough starter, use only a glass, pottery, stone,
      plastic, or wooden utensil. No metal. Stir yeast and sugar together
      with a little water to make a smooth paste. Add raw potato, the rest
      of the water, and flour to thicken. Beat well, then cover with a
      clean towel, and let set a few days until the mixture is good and
      sour and bubbly.

      When it smells good, feed the bubbles 1 cup of flour or whatever
      amount it takes to make elastic, smooth dough, not sticky. Always
      start sourdough bread, rolls, or pancakes with sourdough starter at
      room temperature. And always save 1 cup of starter from each batch
      (or by feeding starter regularly) in order to have starter on hand
      for another time. A good feeding is 1 cup flour, 1/2 cup water, and
      1 teaspoon sugar to a batch of starter at room temperature. It will
      begin to bubble about 2 hours after being fed. Use it when it
      bubbles.

      1 package dry yeast
      2 tablespoons sugar
      1 pint water
      1 Large raw potato, peeled and quartered
      4 cups flour

      Jean Hazlewood's Sourdough 'Biscuits -
      1 1/2 cups flour
      2 teaspoons baking powder
      1/2 teaspoon Baking soda
      1 scant teaspoon salt
      1 / 4 cup butter or cooking oil
      1 cup sourdough starter

      Jean Hazlewood powered husband Earl, three children, all hired
      hands, and a couple of mean-looking tender-hearted dogs with the
      biggest sourdough biscuits I ever saw. They were a regular part of
      breakfast at dawn and went along to lunch. "Cowboys can get ulcers,
      one of the unromantic things the public doesn't know, "Jean
      said. "They leave at 5 a.m. and stay out all day. They ignore
      hunger, so the stomach juices overĀ¬produce. Biscuits and jerky can
      be preventive medicine, carried as a snack."
      Sift dry ingredients together. Cut in butter or stir in oil and add
      sourdough starter. Mix well. Turn dough out on lightly floured
      board. Knead until shiny. Roll out 1/2 inch thick. Cut with floured
      3-inch cutter. Place biscuits in well greased baking pan. Brush with
      melted butter. Let rise in warm spot 1 hour. Bake 20 minutes at 425
      degrees. Makes 12 big biscuits.


      From: Arizona Highways Heritage Cookbook




      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Danny" <ggddaaee@c...>
      wrote:
      > Hi Everyone,
      >
      > I have been lurking for several weeks as a new DO cook. I have a
      lodge 12
      > and will probably add a Lodge 10 tomorrow. This is a great place
      to get
      > info and I am going to try to get to some DOGs soon.
      >
      > I want to try to make sourdough biscuits in the Dutch but have
      never done
      > sour anything. So where do I start? I have been looking around
      and I am
      > not sure that I am clear on the starter, do I make some up, let
      it sour,
      > use some and use the remainder for a seed for next time? What is
      a good
      > starter to make? And lastly what is a good recipe for the
      biscuits
      > themselves.
      >
      > On a side note, Sportsman's Warehouse opened in Oklahoma City this
      week and
      > have an excellent DO section. They have $10.00 off coupons when
      you spend
      > $50.00 right now hence the 10 Lodge in my immediate future (with
      other
      > accessories).
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Dan
      > Edmond, OK




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    • AllenJ.
      You just leave it in there. I have no idea what it does for it, but I replaced mine after about a year. I had used some bread flour in it thinking it might
      Message 2 of 15 , Oct 1, 2005
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        You just leave it in there. I have no idea what it does for it, but
        I replaced mine after about a year. I had used some bread flour in
        it thinking it might be stronger in action. Instead, it darn near
        killed it. My wife had also bought some Walmart general purpose
        flour that was dead in recipes. I told her that we need to stay
        with the best products for the best results. It works. I have a
        book with a lot of weird sourdough recipes. I just like this one
        the best.

        AllenJ. --- Pump Doc

        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Danny" <ggddaaee@c...>
        wrote:
        > Pump Doc,
        >
        > I have seen this potato thing a few places, do you just leave the
        potato in the starter for ever? If I understand it you peel,
        quarter and place in the starter, in chucks? What does it do for it
        anyway?
        >
        > Dan
        > ----- Original Message -----
        > From: AllenJ.
        > To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Saturday, October 01, 2005 8:42 PM
        > Subject: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: sourdough biscuts (Art Perry's
        >
        >
        > Dan, I scanned this from an old Arizona Highways Cookbook a
        friend
        > had, and which I bought a copy of on Half.com . The starter is
        > easy to make and maintain. It is a mild starter and also gets
        > active real quick when you get out to use it. The biscuit
        recipe is
        > below it. I am cooking a batch tomorrow with an alternate heat
        > source. I have a sourdough coffee cake that is just right for
        the
        > 10" when you are ready ---- enjoy the recipe and your new hobby.
        >
        > AllenJ. --- Pump Doc
        >
        > ******************************************************
        >
        > Art Perry's Sourdough Starter-
        >
        > ArtPerry was born in Flagstaff, could carve a willow whistle and
        do
        > bird calls, and knew the best of outdoor cooking secrets,
        starting
        > with sourdough. His sourdough starter went all ways. Beat in a
        > couple of eggs and you've got everyday pancakes. Add sweet corn
        cut
        > off the cob to make corn oysters. Add a little sugar, milk, and
        soda
        > and the result is fancy Sunday pancakes.
        >
        > To make sourdough starter, use only a glass, pottery, stone,
        > plastic, or wooden utensil. No metal. Stir yeast and sugar
        together
        > with a little water to make a smooth paste. Add raw potato, the
        rest
        > of the water, and flour to thicken. Beat well, then cover with a
        > clean towel, and let set a few days until the mixture is good
        and
        > sour and bubbly.
        >
        > When it smells good, feed the bubbles 1 cup of flour or whatever
        > amount it takes to make elastic, smooth dough, not sticky.
        Always
        > start sourdough bread, rolls, or pancakes with sourdough starter
        at
        > room temperature. And always save 1 cup of starter from each
        batch
        > (or by feeding starter regularly) in order to have starter on
        hand
        > for another time. A good feeding is 1 cup flour, 1/2 cup water,
        and
        > 1 teaspoon sugar to a batch of starter at room temperature. It
        will
        > begin to bubble about 2 hours after being fed. Use it when it
        > bubbles.
        >
        > 1 package dry yeast
        > 2 tablespoons sugar
        > 1 pint water
        > 1 Large raw potato, peeled and quartered
        > 4 cups flour
        >
        > Jean Hazlewood's Sourdough 'Biscuits -
        > 1 1/2 cups flour
        > 2 teaspoons baking powder
        > 1/2 teaspoon Baking soda
        > 1 scant teaspoon salt
        > 1 / 4 cup butter or cooking oil
        > 1 cup sourdough starter
        >
        > Jean Hazlewood powered husband Earl, three children, all hired
        > hands, and a couple of mean-looking tender-hearted dogs with the
        > biggest sourdough biscuits I ever saw. They were a regular part
        of
        > breakfast at dawn and went along to lunch. "Cowboys can get
        ulcers,
        > one of the unromantic things the public doesn't know, "Jean
        > said. "They leave at 5 a.m. and stay out all day. They ignore
        > hunger, so the stomach juices overĀ¬produce. Biscuits and jerky
        can
        > be preventive medicine, carried as a snack."
        > Sift dry ingredients together. Cut in butter or stir in oil and
        add
        > sourdough starter. Mix well. Turn dough out on lightly floured
        > board. Knead until shiny. Roll out 1/2 inch thick. Cut with
        floured
        > 3-inch cutter. Place biscuits in well greased baking pan. Brush
        with
        > melted butter. Let rise in warm spot 1 hour. Bake 20 minutes at
        425
        > degrees. Makes 12 big biscuits.
        >
        >
        > From: Arizona Highways Heritage Cookbook
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Danny" <ggddaaee@c...>
        > wrote:
        > > Hi Everyone,
        > >
        > > I have been lurking for several weeks as a new DO cook. I
        have a
        > lodge 12
        > > and will probably add a Lodge 10 tomorrow. This is a great
        place
        > to get
        > > info and I am going to try to get to some DOGs soon.
        > >
        > > I want to try to make sourdough biscuits in the Dutch but have
        > never done
        > > sour anything. So where do I start? I have been looking
        around
        > and I am
        > > not sure that I am clear on the starter, do I make some up,
        let
        > it sour,
        > > use some and use the remainder for a seed for next time? What
        is
        > a good
        > > starter to make? And lastly what is a good recipe for the
        > biscuits
        > > themselves.
        > >
        > > On a side note, Sportsman's Warehouse opened in Oklahoma City
        this
        > week and
        > > have an excellent DO section. They have $10.00 off coupons
        when
        > you spend
        > > $50.00 right now hence the 10 Lodge in my immediate future
        (with
        > other
        > > accessories).
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > >
        > > Dan
        > > Edmond, OK
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group,
        > click on "Edit My Membership" at the top right of the Group main
        page.
        > Then click on "Leave Group".
        >
        >
        >
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
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        > a.. Visit your group "dutchovencooking" on the web.
        >
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        >
        > c.. Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms
        of Service.
        >
        >
        > -------------------------------------------------------------------
        -----------
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marc Evans
        ... Soughdough starter is typically a mixture of flour and water that provides a host environment for yeast spores and lacto-bacillus cultures. Without getting
        Message 3 of 15 , Oct 2, 2005
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          > > I have seen this potato thing a few places, do you just leave the
          > potato in the starter for ever? If I understand it you peel,
          > quarter and place in the starter, in chucks? What does it do for it
          > anyway?

          Soughdough starter is typically a mixture of flour and water that provides a
          host environment for yeast spores and lacto-bacillus cultures.

          Without getting too longwinded, the yeast metabolizes sugars and starches
          (which is why some starter recipes call for a potato) in the flour which in
          turn produces carbon dioxide (the leavening agent) and alcohol (the hooch).
          This process also provides food for the lacto-bacillus whose purpose it is
          to add flavor and prevent mold growth in the starter.

          Just like there are almost as many opinions about certain DO cooking
          techniques as there are DO cooks, sourdough enthusiasts can be even more
          opinionated. Along those lines I will add that, even though it is quicker to
          begin a starter using a commercial yeast and potato water, my preference is
          to begin the starter using only flour and water. My reason for doing this is
          that I want my starter to developed from the wild yeast spores that live in
          my area as opposed to simply perpetuating a commercial yeast strain.

          With the possible exception of boiling water, there is nothing that I do in
          the kitchen that is simpler than working with my starter.

          I prefer an unbleached all-purpose flour and I use bottled spring water. To
          get a starter going simply mix 1 1/2 - 2 cups of flour in a non-metallic
          bowl, stir in the water until the mixture has about the consistency of a
          cake batter and just leave it on the kitchen counter. That's it.

          The next day pour out 1 cup of the mixture and add another cup of flour and
          enough water to maintain the consistency and you just keep repeating this on
          a daily basis until the yeast spores build to the proper levels, at which
          point they will start to feed on the sugars and starches in the flour and
          the starter will began foaming. It might take 3-4 days for this happen or it
          could take a week a more, depending on a number of factors.

          Once the starter is flourishing the only thing that will kill it is heat. I
          look at my starter as kind of like a pet and as long as I make sure that it
          has enough food (flour) and water it will live indefinitely.
        • Danny
          Marc, Do you always leave it on the counter or do you refrigerate it at some point? I am going to go with commercial yeast to get a quick start but I think I
          Message 4 of 15 , Oct 2, 2005
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            Marc,

            Do you always leave it on the counter or do you refrigerate it at some point? I am going to go with commercial yeast to get a quick start but I think I am going to try this as well.

            Dan
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Marc Evans
            To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sunday, October 02, 2005 3:41 AM
            Subject: RE: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: sourdough biscuts


            > > I have seen this potato thing a few places, do you just leave the
            > potato in the starter for ever? If I understand it you peel,
            > quarter and place in the starter, in chucks? What does it do for it
            > anyway?

            Soughdough starter is typically a mixture of flour and water that provides a
            host environment for yeast spores and lacto-bacillus cultures.

            Without getting too longwinded, the yeast metabolizes sugars and starches
            (which is why some starter recipes call for a potato) in the flour which in
            turn produces carbon dioxide (the leavening agent) and alcohol (the hooch).
            This process also provides food for the lacto-bacillus whose purpose it is
            to add flavor and prevent mold growth in the starter.

            Just like there are almost as many opinions about certain DO cooking
            techniques as there are DO cooks, sourdough enthusiasts can be even more
            opinionated. Along those lines I will add that, even though it is quicker to
            begin a starter using a commercial yeast and potato water, my preference is
            to begin the starter using only flour and water. My reason for doing this is
            that I want my starter to developed from the wild yeast spores that live in
            my area as opposed to simply perpetuating a commercial yeast strain.

            With the possible exception of boiling water, there is nothing that I do in
            the kitchen that is simpler than working with my starter.

            I prefer an unbleached all-purpose flour and I use bottled spring water. To
            get a starter going simply mix 1 1/2 - 2 cups of flour in a non-metallic
            bowl, stir in the water until the mixture has about the consistency of a
            cake batter and just leave it on the kitchen counter. That's it.

            The next day pour out 1 cup of the mixture and add another cup of flour and
            enough water to maintain the consistency and you just keep repeating this on
            a daily basis until the yeast spores build to the proper levels, at which
            point they will start to feed on the sugars and starches in the flour and
            the starter will began foaming. It might take 3-4 days for this happen or it
            could take a week a more, depending on a number of factors.

            Once the starter is flourishing the only thing that will kill it is heat. I
            look at my starter as kind of like a pet and as long as I make sure that it
            has enough food (flour) and water it will live indefinitely.




            To unsubscribe from this group,
            click on "Edit My Membership" at the top right of the Group main page.
            Then click on "Leave Group".



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          • Marc Evans
            ... When I m not going to be using the starter within a day or two I leave it in the refrigerator. What this does is slows down the metabolic process and
            Message 5 of 15 , Oct 2, 2005
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              > Marc,
              >
              > Do you always leave it on the counter or do you refrigerate it at
              > some point? I am going to go with commercial yeast to get a
              > quick start but I think I am going to try this as well.
              >
              > Dan

              When I'm not going to be using the starter within a day or two I leave it in
              the refrigerator. What this does is slows down the metabolic process and
              eliminates the need to feed the starter everyday. When refrigerated I
              usually feed the starter about once a week but I've gone as long as two
              weeks without a problem.
            • Danny
              Wishbone, Don t know but I ll see. I need to get back over there to get the 10 inch, I didn t make it today. I ll let you know. Dan ... From: Wishbone To:
              Message 6 of 15 , Oct 2, 2005
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                Wishbone,

                Don't know but I'll see. I need to get back over there to get the 10 inch, I didn't make it today. I'll let you know.

                Dan
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Wishbone
                To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Sunday, October 02, 2005 8:59 PM
                Subject: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: sourdough biscuts


                Hello Dan, Wishbone up here in Kansas. Near Wichita. I was wondering
                if Sportsmans Warehouse had any Texport 20 quart DOs. Gander Mtn
                opened in Wichita last month carring Lodge & Creek Side Castiron. In
                my opion & the Creek Side ones I saw they wernt worth taking home.
                They were the poorest quality in casting I've ever seen. And for
                $69.95 they wernt worth that to me. Wishbone-Ks





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              • Wishbone
                Thanks Dan, Next time you are over there please look for me. Theres a DO Cooking contest Oct,15 near Wichita,Ks. let me know if interested in watching or
                Message 7 of 15 , Oct 3, 2005
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                  Thanks Dan, Next time you are over there please look for me. Theres a
                  DO Cooking contest Oct,15 near Wichita,Ks. let me know if interested
                  in watching or cooking & I'll have Cookndad send you all the info.
                  Its in Bel-Aire,Ks Wishbone
                • rlwhitetr3b1963
                  I started some starter a few weeks ago. I got busy and it has been a while since I feed it. How do I tell if I killed it or not? Rich ... two
                  Message 8 of 15 , Oct 3, 2005
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                    I started some starter a few weeks ago. I got busy and it has been a
                    while since I feed it. How do I tell if I killed it or not?

                    Rich

                    >When refrigerated I
                    > usually feed the starter about once a week but I've gone as long as
                    two
                    > weeks without a problem.
                  • Matt
                    Rich, I am not a pro but what I ve found out through trial and error (more of the latter) is that a sourdough starter is more resiliant than you may think.
                    Message 9 of 15 , Oct 3, 2005
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                      Rich,
                      I am not a pro but what I've found out through trial and error (more
                      of the latter) is that a sourdough starter is more resiliant than
                      you may think. Feed it every day for the next several days and if
                      there are even a few little yeasties left it will come back and
                      you'll be in business again.Then all you have to do is put it to
                      good use. Matt

                      --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlwhitetr3b1963"
                      <rlwhitetr3b@h...> wrote:
                      >
                      > I started some starter a few weeks ago. I got busy and it has
                      been a
                      > while since I feed it. How do I tell if I killed it or not?
                      >
                      > Rich
                      >
                      > >When refrigerated I
                      > > usually feed the starter about once a week but I've gone as long
                      as
                      > two
                      > > weeks without a problem.
                    • debbieredbear2000
                      How does it smell? How does it look? If it has green or black fuzz growing, toss it. If it has a foul smell, toss it. If it smells somewhat yeasty feed it and
                      Message 10 of 15 , Oct 3, 2005
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                        How does it smell? How does it look? If it has green or black fuzz
                        growing, toss it. If it has a foul smell, toss it. If it smells
                        somewhat yeasty feed it and see what happens.

                        --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "rlwhitetr3b1963"
                        <rlwhitetr3b@h...> wrote:
                        >
                        > I started some starter a few weeks ago. I got busy and it has been a
                        > while since I feed it. How do I tell if I killed it or not?
                        >
                        > Rich
                        >
                        > >When refrigerated I
                        > > usually feed the starter about once a week but I've gone as long as
                        > two
                        > > weeks without a problem.
                      • Marc Evans
                        ... Rich -- Like the other members said, as long as the starter has not gotten moldy, it will be fine. As I mentioned previously, the only thing that will kill
                        Message 11 of 15 , Oct 3, 2005
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                          > I started some starter a few weeks ago. I got busy and it has been a
                          > while since I feed it. How do I tell if I killed it or not?


                          Rich --

                          Like the other members said, as long as the starter has not gotten moldy, it
                          will be fine. As I mentioned previously, the only thing that will kill the
                          starter is heat. The starter may get soupy and stop "working" but that's
                          only because the yeast has run out food. As soon as you feed it again it
                          will some back.

                          I've never tried it myself but I have heard of people taking a portion of
                          their starter and letting it dry out completely, storing it for an
                          indefinite time, and than reconstituting it with water, feeding it, and have
                          it be just as before. The yeast spores will live indefinitely.

                          Marc
                        • Marc Evans
                          I m getting ready for my annual October solo camping trip to the Eastern Sierra which, this year, will also include a couple of days in and around Death
                          Message 12 of 15 , Oct 3, 2005
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                            I'm getting ready for my annual October solo camping trip to the Eastern
                            Sierra which, this year, will also include a couple of days in and around
                            Death Valley. This will be the first time that I am taking my DO's on a
                            camping trip and although I have a couple of things in mind, I would
                            appreciate any menu suggestions, primarily main course type stuff, that any
                            of you might have in smaller portions. Thanks!
                          • Ronda
                            Marc - there s a bread recipe in the files that s made for an 8 oven - it s called Instant Camp Bread. Also - here s a recipe (sort of) for some potatoes I
                            Message 13 of 15 , Oct 4, 2005
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                              Marc - there's a bread recipe in the files that's made for an 8"
                              oven - it's called "Instant Camp Bread." Also - here's a recipe
                              (sort of) for some potatoes I did in the 8" awhile back.
                              A different potato recipe

                              Not a recipe exactly - just something we tried. I scrubbed the
                              potatoes, did not peel, and boiled just a little while. (I boiled
                              them first because Doug was fixing steak on the grill and I wasn't
                              sure if I had enough time to cook them from scratch in the DO) Then
                              sliced into the Dutch Oven. Added some sliced onion. Sprinkled with
                              garlic salt, black pepper and paprika, then bottled Italian salad
                              dressing. They were pretty good! Ronda


                              --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Marc Evans" <marce@a...>
                              wrote:
                              > I'm getting ready for my annual October solo camping trip to the
                              Eastern
                              > Sierra which, this year, will also include a couple of days in and
                              around
                              > Death Valley. This will be the first time that I am taking my DO's
                              on a
                              > camping trip and although I have a couple of things in mind, I would
                              > appreciate any menu suggestions, primarily main course type stuff,
                              that any
                              > of you might have in smaller portions. Thanks!
                            • debbieredbear2000
                              ... The yeast spores will live indefinitely. ... I have had my starter freeze and come back and I have had it dry out and come back. The time it froze, we have
                              Message 14 of 15 , Oct 4, 2005
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                                --- In dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com, "Marc Evans" <marce@a...>
                                wrote:
                                >
                                The yeast spores will live indefinitely.
                                >
                                > Marc

                                I have had my starter freeze and come back and I have had it dry out
                                and come back. The time it froze, we have fridge problems. Everything
                                froze. I could not get the starter out of it's jar as it was frozen
                                solid. I put the starter on the counter and a day later, I noticed
                                bubbles on top. So I fed it and it bounced right back. The time it
                                dried out, we were gone a long time. So I put water in it to get it out
                                of the jar, and again, it started to bubble up. I have had my starter
                                since about 1984.
                              • Danny
                                Wishbone, Sorry for the delay in checking this out, I finally made it back to the store today and they didn t have any of the Texport 20 quart DO. They did
                                Message 15 of 15 , Oct 13, 2005
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  Wishbone,

                                  Sorry for the delay in checking this out, I finally made it back to the store today and they didn't have any of the Texport 20 quart DO. They did have some aluminum DOs but I didn't look to see who made them. They had many of the Lodge and Camp Chef ovens and a bunch of the Lewis and Clark DOs in 10, 12, and 14 qt. I think the 14 quart Commemorative was $37.00 or there abouts. Is that good, it seemed to be to me. Grand opening is Saturday and I hope they will have some specials and maybe demos going on. All in all they have the best camp cooking section of anyone in OKC.

                                  Dan
                                  ----- Original Message -----
                                  From: Wishbone
                                  To: dutchovencooking@yahoogroups.com
                                  Sent: Sunday, October 02, 2005 8:59 PM
                                  Subject: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: sourdough biscuts


                                  Hello Dan, Wishbone up here in Kansas. Near Wichita. I was wondering
                                  if Sportsmans Warehouse had any Texport 20 quart DOs. Gander Mtn
                                  opened in Wichita last month carring Lodge & Creek Side Castiron. In
                                  my opion & the Creek Side ones I saw they wernt worth taking home.
                                  They were the poorest quality in casting I've ever seen. And for
                                  $69.95 they wernt worth that to me. Wishbone-Ks





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