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Re: [DUTCH OVEN COOKING] Re: Rough bottom

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  • jojones1997@aol.com
    To elaborate a bit on my earlier post...
    Message 1 of 9 , Mar 1, 2005
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      To elaborate a bit on my earlier post...

      <<
      > Did you oil it first, and if so, what did you use? I would think 500
      > degrees
      > would bake OFF any seasoning, but your results sound intriguing. Could you
      > let us know the steps you took, how long in oven, etc.?
      >>

      The reason I ask is that I've been buying some vintage cast iron of late.
      Much of it needs to be stripped down to the bare metal to get rid of a variety
      of sins over the ages, and start over. By that time, after quite some work,
      it's pretty pristine. I've tried several seasoning temperatures and it seems
      that too high a heat makes the crisco (and definitely oil) start thickening and
      getting gummy. (I'm not talking a thick coat either.) I've read BOTH that
      500 degrees will pretty much bake off anything yet from another opinion, I've
      heard that it solidifies and hardens the seasoning. So I'm curious how you went
      about it. Sure sounds like you got some good results. I admit to being a
      little timid about experimenting with my vintage stuff because so much work went
      into getting it back to "new" state. But oooo, it sho is purdy!!! ;-)


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    • jojones1997@aol.com
      In a message dated 3/1/2005 6:56:17 PM Eastern Standard Time, ... Hi Jerry-- I added to my query post regarding your seasoning temp before reading the above
      Message 2 of 9 , Mar 1, 2005
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        In a message dated 3/1/2005 6:56:17 PM Eastern Standard Time,
        riparian_b@... writes:


        > Joanna...No 500 deg is not hot enough to take off the
        > seasoning. I just did that to help the Lodge
        > preseasoning along. I used veg. oil, what ever we had
        > in the cabinet. If you hang around here long enough
        > you'll learn that high temp seasoning is a regular
        > topic.
        > I'm not sure if I helped the skillet or not with the
        > extra seasoning. My point with the post was the newer
        > Lodge stuff I have bought in the last couple of years
        > as been rough on the cooking surface, much more so
        > than stuff I had bought as long ago as 25 years. I
        > think Lodge has changed their manufacturing process
        > with the rough surface a result.I was trying to make
        > the point that roughness is not always a bad thing.
        > My hope for the skillet is someday it will become a
        > "not for sale at any price" treasure that some of my
        > other stuff has become with a nice thick seasoning
        > that water beads up on and absolutely nothing sticks
        > to.
        >
        > Jerry

        Hi Jerry-- I added to my query post regarding your seasoning temp before
        reading the above reply. I may just give your way a shot for the heck of it with
        one of my vintage ones to see what happens. So far I've gotten the state you
        mentioned... beading where nothing further penetrates and an egg will slide
        around. So while that may be pretty ideal, I'm very intrigued with a high heat
        seasoning because after a certain heat, I'm getting shiny-tacky spots. It
        may be the kind of thing where up to a certain temperature point it won't get
        sticky, and then AFTER a temperature point it won't, but that somewhere in
        between it will. (That's the point where I've been stopping.) We can call me
        chicken. LOL!
        Joanna



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