Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

India (Calcutta)

Expand Messages
  • Edmund Raphael
    I was very interested in Jimmie Robertson s contribution re. Dundonians going to work in India. Three of my uncles were in the Jute trade, all with Clive Jute
    Message 1 of 5 , Jan 4, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      I was very interested in Jimmie Robertson's contribution re. Dundonians going to work in India.
      Three of my uncles were in the Jute trade, all with Clive Jute Works. Two were brothers; one an engineer and the other was "office", as they said at that time. The frightful lack of permitted social contact between engineers and office, only illustrated the huge lack of education of so many of those Anglo-Indian chaps". This type of behaviour caused many family rifts and misery for the wives of the engineers.
       
      On their return home, the idiotic behaviour of thos who had become snobs (especially in Broughty Ferry) was quite ridiculous to behold. Many had saved little money but talked profusely about the number of servants they had. Some of the intended to be amusing stories, told by ex-Calcutta Dundonians, were quite unfunny, only illustrating the hideous vulgarity which many Indians had to endure.
       
      I am glad to know, that my father's connection with India came late in his life, when he decided to do what he had been trained for at the Caledon ship yard. He took a few years as a chief engineer with the Scindia Steamship Navigation Co., which transported raw jute to Dundee in rusting liberty ships. We were always invited to take lunch with the captains of these ships, when they docked at Dundee. The Indian officers were a delight, as were the Pakistani crew, who lined the rails, with welcoming smiles on their faces. These are my childhood memories, when anti-semetic comments were few.
       
      Perhaps someone will write about Indian Army officers. Does anyone remember characters such as Col. Harry Banks, who lived in Albany Terrace?
       
      Edmund Raphael
    • Anne Ide
      Eugenie Fraser s book, A House By THe Hooghly contains vivid descriptions of the Dundee ex-pats, and includes a photograph iof  Dundee High School FPs
      Message 2 of 5 , Jan 4, 2013
      • 0 Attachment

        Eugenie Fraser's book, "A House By THe Hooghly" contains vivid descriptions of the Dundee ex-pats, and includes a photograph iof  Dundee High School FPs' dinner in Calcutta! 
         
           
        Anne
        From: Edmund Raphael <edmundraphael@...>
        To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, 4 January 2013, 16:57
        Subject: [dundee-history] India (Calcutta)
         
        I was very interested in Jimmie Robertson's contribution re. Dundonians going to work in India.
        Three of my uncles were in the Jute trade, all with Clive Jute Works. Two were brothers; one an engineer and the other was "office", as they said at that time. The frightful lack of permitted social contact between engineers and office, only illustrated the huge lack of education of so many of those Anglo-Indian chaps". This type of behaviour caused many family rifts and misery for the wives of the engineers.
         
        On their return home, the idiotic behaviour of thos who had become snobs (especially in Broughty Ferry) was quite ridiculous to behold. Many had saved little money but talked profusely about the number of servants they had. Some of the intended to be amusing stories, told by ex-Calcutta Dundonians, were quite unfunny, only illustrating the hideous vulgarity which many Indians had to endure.
         
        I am glad to know, that my father's connection with India came late in his life, when he decided to do what he had been trained for at the Caledon ship yard. He took a few years as a chief engineer with the Scindia Steamship Navigation Co., which transported raw jute to Dundee in rusting liberty ships. We were always invited to take lunch with the captains of these ships, when they docked at Dundee. The Indian officers were a delight, as were the Pakistani crew, who lined the rails, with welcoming smiles on their faces. These are my childhood memories, when anti-semetic comments were few.
         
        Perhaps someone will write about Indian Army officers. Does anyone remember characters such as Col. Harry Banks, who lived in Albany Terrace?
         
        Edmund Raphael
      • PATRICIA PARKER
        Having brought up the subject of Dundee natives and jute traveling far from Scottish shores, my family were among those former citizens of Dundee and the Jute
        Message 3 of 5 , Jan 4, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Having brought up the subject of Dundee natives and jute traveling far from Scottish shores, my family were among those former citizens of Dundee and the Jute industry who were offered visas to come to the U.S. to set up a mill in Ludlow, Massachusetts.  The word went out that qualified people would be helped to come to this country to work in this industry.  My mother's family (Petrie and Neish) had immigrated to Montreal and came here from there.  This factory and people contributed greatly to the World War II effort by manufacturing canvas for the armed services.  Those mills are making something else now, but their service is notable.

           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
          Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


           

          To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
          From: edmundraphael@...
          Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2013 16:57:18 +0000
          Subject: [dundee-history] India (Calcutta)

           
          I was very interested in Jimmie Robertson's contribution re. Dundonians going to work in India.
          Three of my uncles were in the Jute trade, all with Clive Jute Works. Two were brothers; one an engineer and the other was "office", as they said at that time. The frightful lack of permitted social contact between engineers and office, only illustrated the huge lack of education of so many of those Anglo-Indian chaps". This type of behaviour caused many family rifts and misery for the wives of the engineers.
           
          On their return home, the idiotic behaviour of thos who had become snobs (especially in Broughty Ferry) was quite ridiculous to behold. Many had saved little money but talked profusely about the number of servants they had. Some of the intended to be amusing stories, told by ex-Calcutta Dundonians, were quite unfunny, only illustrating the hideous vulgarity which many Indians had to endure.
           
          I am glad to know, that my father's connection with India came late in his life, when he decided to do what he had been trained for at the Caledon ship yard. He took a few years as a chief engineer with the Scindia Steamship Navigation Co., which transported raw jute to Dundee in rusting liberty ships. We were always invited to take lunch with the captains of these ships, when they docked at Dundee. The Indian officers were a delight, as were the Pakistani crew, who lined the rails, with welcoming smiles on their faces. These are my childhood memories, when anti-semetic comments were few.
           
          Perhaps someone will write about Indian Army officers. Does anyone remember characters such as Col. Harry Banks, who lived in Albany Terrace?
           
          Edmund Raphael


        • China King
          Interesting. My g-grandfather Paterson also left Dundee for Montreal, but he stayed there..wonder if there was some reason Dundonians chose Montreal. Cheers,
          Message 4 of 5 , Jan 4, 2013
          • 0 Attachment

            Interesting. My g-grandfather Paterson also left Dundee for Montreal, but he stayed there….wonder if there was some reason Dundonians chose Montreal.

             

            Cheers,

            China King

             

            From: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com [mailto:dundee-history@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of PATRICIA PARKER
            Sent: Friday, January 04, 2013 11:06 AM
            To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: RE: [dundee-history] India (Calcutta)

             

             

            Having brought up the subject of Dundee natives and jute traveling far from Scottish shores, my family were among those former citizens of Dundee and the Jute industry who were offered visas to come to the U.S. to set up a mill in Ludlow, Massachusetts.  The word went out that qualified people would be helped to come to this country to work in this industry.  My mother's family (Petrie and Neish) had immigrated to Montreal and came here from there.  This factory and people contributed greatly to the World War II effort by manufacturing canvas for the armed services.  Those mills are making something else now, but their service is notable.

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
            Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


             


            To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
            From: edmundraphael@...
            Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2013 16:57:18 +0000
            Subject: [dundee-history] India (Calcutta)

             

            I was very interested in Jimmie Robertson's contribution re. Dundonians going to work in India.

            Three of my uncles were in the Jute trade, all with Clive Jute Works. Two were brothers; one an engineer and the other was "office", as they said at that time. The frightful lack of permitted social contact between engineers and office, only illustrated the huge lack of education of so many of those Anglo-Indian chaps". This type of behaviour caused many family rifts and misery for the wives of the engineers.

             

            On their return home, the idiotic behaviour of thos who had become snobs (especially in Broughty Ferry) was quite ridiculous to behold. Many had saved little money but talked profusely about the number of servants they had. Some of the intended to be amusing stories, told by ex-Calcutta Dundonians, were quite unfunny, only illustrating the hideous vulgarity which many Indians had to endure.

             

            I am glad to know, that my father's connection with India came late in his life, when he decided to do what he had been trained for at the Caledon ship yard. He took a few years as a chief engineer with the Scindia Steamship Navigation Co., which transported raw jute to Dundee in rusting liberty ships. We were always invited to take lunch with the captains of these ships, when they docked at Dundee. The Indian officers were a delight, as were the Pakistani crew, who lined the rails, with welcoming smiles on their faces. These are my childhood memories, when anti-semetic comments were few.

             

            Perhaps someone will write about Indian Army officers. Does anyone remember characters such as Col. Harry Banks, who lived in Albany Terrace?

             

            Edmund Raphael

             

            No virus found in this message.
            Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
            Version: 2013.0.2805 / Virus Database: 2637/6008 - Release Date: 01/03/13

          • Pat Carson
            And interesting to see another Paterson researcher! Would love to know your Paterson folk - happy to correspond off-list as this is genealogy, rather that
            Message 5 of 5 , Jan 28, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              And interesting to see another Paterson researcher! Would love to know your Paterson folk – happy to correspond off-list as this is genealogy, rather that history - if you prefer. Our Patersons connect to the surnames Orkney & Findlay, have roots on Montrose/Laurencekirk and at least two have landed in Canada (Calgary from one contact) via Dundee. And some ended up in Calcutta too!

               

              Pat

              "Here's tae us! Wha's like us? Damn few! - an' they're a' deid!" Old Scots Toast

              Check out my website www.genesontheweb.co.uk

              http://www.facebook.com/patcarsonp

              @patcarsonp (http://twitter.com/patcarsonp)

              http://www.facebook.com/groups/angusadamsons/

               


              From: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com [mailto:dundee-history@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of China King
              Sent: 05 January 2013 02:07
              To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [dundee-history] India (Calcutta)

               




              Interesting. My g-grandfather Paterson also left Dundee for Montreal, but he stayed there….wonder if there was some reason Dundonians chose Montreal.

               

              Cheers,

              China King

               

              From: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com [mailto:dundee-history@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of PATRICIA PARKER
              Sent: Friday, January 04, 2013 11:06 AM
              To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: RE: [dundee-history] India (Calcutta)

               

               

              Having brought up the subject of Dundee natives and jute traveling far from Scottish shores, my family were among those former citizens of Dundee and the Jute industry who were offered visas to come to the U.S. to set up a mill in Ludlow, Massachusetts.  The word went out that qualified people would be helped to come to this country to work in this industry.  My mother's family (Petrie and Neish) had immigrated to Montreal and came here from there.  This factory and people contributed greatly to the World War II effort by manufacturing canvas for the armed services.  Those mills are making something else now, but their service is notable.

               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
               
              Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


               


              To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
              From: edmundraphael@...
              Date: Fri, 4 Jan 2013 16:57:18 +0000
              Subject: [dundee-history] India (Calcutta)

               

              I was very interested in Jimmie Robertson's contribution re. Dundonians going to work in India.

              Three of my uncles were in the Jute trade, all with Clive Jute Works. Two were brothers; one an engineer and the other was "office", as they said at that time. The frightful lack of permitted social contact between engineers and office, only illustrated the huge lack of education of so many of those Anglo-Indian chaps". This type of behaviour caused many family rifts and misery for the wives of the engineers.

               

              On their return home, the idiotic behaviour of thos who had become snobs (especially in Broughty Ferry) was quite ridiculous to behold. Many had saved little money but talked profusely about the number of servants they had. Some of the intended to be amusing stories, told by ex-Calcutta Dundonians, were quite unfunny, only illustrating the hideous vulgarity which many Indians had to endure.

               

              I am glad to know, that my father's connection with India came late in his life, when he decided to do what he had been trained for at the Caledon ship yard. He took a few years as a chief engineer with the Scindia Steamship Navigation Co., which transported raw jute to Dundee in rusting liberty ships. We were always invited to take lunch with the captains of these ships, when they docked at Dundee. The Indian officers were a delight, as were the Pakistani crew, who lined the rails, with welcoming smiles on their faces. These are my childhood memories, when anti-semetic comments were few.

               

              Perhaps someone will write about Indian Army officers. Does anyone remember characters such as Col. Harry Banks, who lived in Albany Terrace?

               

              Edmund Raphael

               

               

              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2013.0.2805 / Virus Database: 2637/6008 - Release Date: 01/03/13


              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2013.0.2890 / Virus Database: 2639/6061 - Release Date: 01/27/13


              No virus found in this message.
              Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
              Version: 2013.0.2890 / Virus Database: 2639/6061 - Release Date: 01/27/13

            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.