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RE: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

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  • PATRICIA PARKER
    Thank you Edmund for bringing things in perspective. Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com From: edmundraphael@googlemail.com
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 1, 2011
      Thank  you Edmund for bringing things in perspective.

       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
      Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


       

      To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
      From: edmundraphael@...
      Date: Tue, 1 Nov 2011 09:25:05 +0000
      Subject: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

       
      Very many thanks to Alastair Smith for his picture shewing, many of the old images which brought back memories of the fairly rough areas of the town, where one walked with certain trepidation, in the 1940s and 50s. I used to look round the junk and antiques' shops in Overgate, Hawkhill and the narrow streets off both. However, our Saturday, morning trip began at the Craig Street Market, where clothes were sold in the main. Jean Sinclair was the perceived "diva" of the market, always full of conversation but not polite to everyone.

      I wonder if anyone has any photographic images of any of the Broughty Ferry, Victorian merchants' villas or mansion houses (not ones of Castleroy and Carbet Castle, which were produced in dozens)?
      One photograph eludes absolutely everyone and that is of "Ashcliff", which was built for Sir George Baxter and formerly occupied the site where now the Harris Academy stands.
      Make this something to remember and, either tell the group, if you find an image or send it to our very kind and professional City Archivist, Iain Flett.
      Lucky hunting.

      Edmund Raphael


    • Alastair Smith
      not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front, my family were fishers there till 1920 then moved
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 1, 2011
      not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front, my family were fishers there till 1920 then moved up the coast to fish when it pretty much died in the ferry....

      i attached a album page from a set that was marked broughty ferry, big houses, i only really know the streets by the coast, you might recognize it though......and attached the print from the hill showing some of the bigger houses in 1890......

      i have as it happens seen an early photo of building at harris academy prior to it being a school, but can't find it..........




      --- On Tue, 1/11/11, Edmund <edmundraphael@...> wrote:

      From: Edmund <edmundraphael@...>
      Subject: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images
      To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, 1 November, 2011, 9:25

       

      Very many thanks to Alastair Smith for his picture shewing, many of the old images which brought back memories of the fairly rough areas of the town, where one walked with certain trepidation, in the 1940s and 50s. I used to look round the junk and antiques' shops in Overgate, Hawkhill and the narrow streets off both. However, our Saturday, morning trip began at the Craig Street Market, where clothes were sold in the main. Jean Sinclair was the perceived "diva" of the market, always full of conversation but not polite to everyone.

      I wonder if anyone has any photographic images of any of the Broughty Ferry, Victorian merchants' villas or mansion houses (not ones of Castleroy and Carbet Castle, which were produced in dozens)?
      One photograph eludes absolutely everyone and that is of "Ashcliff", which was built for Sir George Baxter and formerly occupied the site where now the Harris Academy stands.
      Make this something to remember and, either tell the group, if you find an image or send it to our very kind and professional City Archivist, Iain Flett.
      Lucky hunting.

      Edmund Raphael

    • PATRICIA PARKER
      My mother was born in Aberdeen, but her mother was born in Dundee, and I grew up hearing many stories about Dundee. I also grew up with my Nany s broad
      Message 3 of 10 , Nov 2, 2011
        My mother was born in Aberdeen, but her mother was born in Dundee, and I grew up hearing many stories about Dundee.  I also grew up with my Nany's broad accent, and I credit hearing that with being to understand just about any accent from anywhere in the world.  My hint is: listen to the English behind the accent.  It works all the time.

         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
         
        Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


         

        To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
        From: alastair_smithuk@...
        Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2011 00:55:40 +0000
        Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images [2 Attachments]

         
        [Attachment(s) from Alastair Smith included below]
        not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front, my family were fishers there till 1920 then moved up the coast to fish when it pretty much died in the ferry....

        i attached a album page from a set that was marked broughty ferry, big houses, i only really know the streets by the coast, you might recognize it though......and attached the print from the hill showing some of the bigger houses in 1890......

        i have as it happens seen an early photo of building at harris academy prior to it being a school, but can't find it..........




        --- On Tue, 1/11/11, Edmund <edmundraphael@...> wrote:

        From: Edmund <edmundraphael@...>
        Subject: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images
        To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, 1 November, 2011, 9:25

         

        Very many thanks to Alastair Smith for his picture shewing, many of the old images which brought back memories of the fairly rough areas of the town, where one walked with certain trepidation, in the 1940s and 50s. I used to look round the junk and antiques' shops in Overgate, Hawkhill and the narrow streets off both. However, our Saturday, morning trip began at the Craig Street Market, where clothes were sold in the main. Jean Sinclair was the perceived "diva" of the market, always full of conversation but not polite to everyone.

        I wonder if anyone has any photographic images of any of the Broughty Ferry, Victorian merchants' villas or mansion houses (not ones of Castleroy and Carbet Castle, which were produced in dozens)?
        One photograph eludes absolutely everyone and that is of "Ashcliff", which was built for Sir George Baxter and formerly occupied the site where now the Harris Academy stands.
        Make this something to remember and, either tell the group, if you find an image or send it to our very kind and professional City Archivist, Iain Flett.
        Lucky hunting.

        Edmund Raphael



      • Edmund Raphael
        I never knew much about Aberdeen but well remember the accent. The Shore Porters Society of Virginia Street, used to move furniture for me for many years,
        Message 4 of 10 , Nov 3, 2011
          I never knew much about Aberdeen but well remember the accent. The Shore Porters Society of Virginia Street, used to move furniture for me for many years, until I came to live in the south west of England, exactly half a lifetime since.
           
          I had a very good teacher of English language, my mother's cousin, who was a retired lecturer in that subject, for many years at La Sorbonne. In most cases, pronunciation requires the speaker to know the spelling of each word, which is a huge help in almost all instances. My 'pet hates'
          pertaining to bad pronunciation begin with Febury, Secetary, Indiar (especially the English) Vunrable and I insist on the Scots pronunciation of Proven (not Prove en)
           
          Now, what was all this about!
           
          Best wishes
          Edmund R----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 1:07 AM
          Subject: RE: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

           

          My mother was born in Aberdeen, but her mother was born in Dundee, and I grew up hearing many stories about Dundee.  I also grew up with my Nany's broad accent, and I credit hearing that with being to understand just about any accent from anywhere in the world.  My hint is: listen to the English behind the accent.  It works all the time.

           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
           
          Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


           

          To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
          From: alastair_smithuk@...
          Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2011 00:55:40 +0000
          Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images [2 Attachments]

           
          [Attachment(s) from Alastair Smith included below]
          not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front, my family were fishers there till 1920 then moved up the coast to fish when it pretty much died in the ferry....

          i attached a album page from a set that was marked broughty ferry, big houses, i only really know the streets by the coast, you might recognize it though......and attached the print from the hill showing some of the bigger houses in 1890......

          i have as it happens seen an early photo of building at harris academy prior to it being a school, but can't find it..........




          --- On Tue, 1/11/11, Edmund <edmundraphael@...> wrote:

          From: Edmund <edmundraphael@...>
          Subject: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images
          To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, 1 November, 2011, 9:25

           

          Very many thanks to Alastair Smith for his picture shewing, many of the old images which brought back memories of the fairly rough areas of the town, where one walked with certain trepidation, in the 1940s and 50s. I used to look round the junk and antiques' shops in Overgate, Hawkhill and the narrow streets off both. However, our Saturday, morning trip began at the Craig Street Market, where clothes were sold in the main. Jean Sinclair was the perceived "diva" of the market, always full of conversation but not polite to everyone.

          I wonder if anyone has any photographic images of any of the Broughty Ferry, Victorian merchants' villas or mansion houses (not ones of Castleroy and Carbet Castle, which were produced in dozens)?
          One photograph eludes absolutely everyone and that is of "Ashcliff", which was built for Sir George Baxter and formerly occupied the site where now the Harris Academy stands.
          Make this something to remember and, either tell the group, if you find an image or send it to our very kind and professional City Archivist, Iain Flett.
          Lucky hunting.

          Edmund Raphael



        • PATRICIA PARKER
          I believe this all relates back to the comments against Alistair about his antique photos of Dundee. My pet peeve is the use of like instead of as . My
          Message 5 of 10 , Nov 3, 2011
            I believe this all relates back to the comments against Alistair about his antique photos of Dundee.
             
            My pet peeve is the use of "like" instead of "as".  My husband used to hate it when people called something very or really unique since if something is unique, it needs no adjectives.  However, we must take into consideration that you and I are discussing that language which divides our two English speaking countries.  Oh, oh, I must take the lift as I have a ladder in my silk.
             
            Take care,
             
            Pat

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
            Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


             

            To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
            From: edmundraphael@...
            Date: Thu, 3 Nov 2011 11:50:48 +0000
            Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

             
            I never knew much about Aberdeen but well remember the accent. The Shore Porters Society of Virginia Street, used to move furniture for me for many years, until I came to live in the south west of England, exactly half a lifetime since.
             
            I had a very good teacher of English language, my mother's cousin, who was a retired lecturer in that subject, for many years at La Sorbonne. In most cases, pronunciation requires the speaker to know the spelling of each word, which is a huge help in almost all instances. My 'pet hates'
            pertaining to bad pronunciation begin with Febury, Secetary, Indiar (especially the English) Vunrable and I insist on the Scots pronunciation of Proven (not Prove en)
             
            Now, what was all this about!
             
            Best wishes
            Edmund R----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 1:07 AM
            Subject: RE: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

             

            My mother was born in Aberdeen, but her mother was born in Dundee, and I grew up hearing many stories about Dundee.  I also grew up with my Nany's broad accent, and I credit hearing that with being to understand just about any accent from anywhere in the world.  My hint is: listen to the English behind the accent.  It works all the time.

             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
             
            Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


             

            To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
            From: alastair_smithuk@...
            Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2011 00:55:40 +0000
            Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images [2 Attachments]

             
            [Attachment(s) from Alastair Smith included below]
            not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front, my family were fishers there till 1920 then moved up the coast to fish when it pretty much died in the ferry....

            i attached a album page from a set that was marked broughty ferry, big houses, i only really know the streets by the coast, you might recognize it though......and attached the print from the hill showing some of the bigger houses in 1890......

            i have as it happens seen an early photo of building at harris academy prior to it being a school, but can't find it..........




            --- On Tue, 1/11/11, Edmund <edmundraphael@...> wrote:

            From: Edmund <edmundraphael@...>
            Subject: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images
            To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, 1 November, 2011, 9:25

             

            Very many thanks to Alastair Smith for his picture shewing, many of the old images which brought back memories of the fairly rough areas of the town, where one walked with certain trepidation, in the 1940s and 50s. I used to look round the junk and antiques' shops in Overgate, Hawkhill and the narrow streets off both. However, our Saturday, morning trip began at the Craig Street Market, where clothes were sold in the main. Jean Sinclair was the perceived "diva" of the market, always full of conversation but not polite to everyone.

            I wonder if anyone has any photographic images of any of the Broughty Ferry, Victorian merchants' villas or mansion houses (not ones of Castleroy and Carbet Castle, which were produced in dozens)?
            One photograph eludes absolutely everyone and that is of "Ashcliff", which was built for Sir George Baxter and formerly occupied the site where now the Harris Academy stands.
            Make this something to remember and, either tell the group, if you find an image or send it to our very kind and professional City Archivist, Iain Flett.
            Lucky hunting.

            Edmund Raphael






          • jimrob_009
            ... We should all be indebted to Alistair to Edmund for stimulating the old curiosity bugs in us - I have just spent a fascinating couple of hours searching
            Message 6 of 10 , Nov 3, 2011
              --- In dundee-history@yahoogroups.com, Alastair Smith <alastair_smithuk@...> wrote:
              >
              > not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front,.......

              We should all be indebted to Alistair to Edmund for stimulating the old curiosity bugs in us - I have just spent a fascinating couple of hours searching around in YouTubes, as a result of Alistair's leads.

              I find that you can search by originators "handle" or by "Subject"

              Examples of Alistair's colleagues include "speedy692", "Iain40",
              "jameskinmond1980" as well as "whatgoesaround70" - Alistair !!

              Subjects covered include "Dundee Down the Years", "Victorian Dundee part 2" , "Yester Year in Dundee" and I even found a clip on "Stobswell" - which I knew so well, including Dura St, Forfar Road, Pitkerro Road and Mains Loan, and the Morgan !!.

              Many of these clips have been created in recent years - quite remarkable. We should be so grateful for all the hard work involved in putting these cameos together.

              Jimmie
            • Edmund Raphael
              The language in common with the two (or four) countries has interpretation and pronunciation problems, mainly because of regional accents and lazy enunciation.
              Message 7 of 10 , Nov 4, 2011
                The language in common with the two (or four) countries has interpretation and pronunciation problems, mainly because of regional accents and lazy enunciation.
                As with too many changes resultant of the years of change, which followed World War II, lambasting "BBC English", "Oxford Accent" and the 'speaking with a plumb in one's mouth' silly-Billy, inferiority complex was the popular thing to do, in the equality drive towards mass commonality. Simple as that, and it continues.
                Those who were BBC broadcasters delivered their various messages to everyone, the country over. They wanted everyone to understand, so perfect enunciation was the required tool, especially when broadcasting meant radio.
                University lecturers and, indeed, school teachers, required to speak with clarity for the  understanding of all.
                Now, as I begin with deafness and have problems with understing alien expressions and words, this combined with regional accents and disregard for grammer, ever increasing person failure to comprehend is usual.
                 
                Far too often forgotten, is the need to clearly transmit the message , perhaps purposely during a time when procrastination is in so much regular use. Slovenly written or spoken language causes misunderstanding and costly mistakes, oftentimes, perhaps, in hospitals for an example.
                 
                My thought for today
                Edmund R.
                 
                ----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 6:32 PM
                Subject: RE: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

                 

                I believe this all relates back to the comments against Alistair about his antique photos of Dundee.
                 
                My pet peeve is the use of "like" instead of "as".  My husband used to hate it when people called something very or really unique since if something is unique, it needs no adjectives.  However, we must take into consideration that you and I are discussing that language which divides our two English speaking countries.  Oh, oh, I must take the lift as I have a ladder in my silk.
                 
                Take care,
                 
                Pat

                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


                 

                To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                From: edmundraphael@...
                Date: Thu, 3 Nov 2011 11:50:48 +0000
                Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

                 
                I never knew much about Aberdeen but well remember the accent. The Shore Porters Society of Virginia Street, used to move furniture for me for many years, until I came to live in the south west of England, exactly half a lifetime since.
                 
                I had a very good teacher of English language, my mother's cousin, who was a retired lecturer in that subject, for many years at La Sorbonne. In most cases, pronunciation requires the speaker to know the spelling of each word, which is a huge help in almost all instances. My 'pet hates'
                pertaining to bad pronunciation begin with Febury, Secetary, Indiar (especially the English) Vunrable and I insist on the Scots pronunciation of Proven (not Prove en)
                 
                Now, what was all this about!
                 
                Best wishes
                Edmund R----- Original Message -----
                Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 1:07 AM
                Subject: RE: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

                 

                My mother was born in Aberdeen, but her mother was born in Dundee, and I grew up hearing many stories about Dundee.  I also grew up with my Nany's broad accent, and I credit hearing that with being to understand just about any accent from anywhere in the world.  My hint is: listen to the English behind the accent.  It works all the time.

                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


                 

                To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                From: alastair_smithuk@...
                Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2011 00:55:40 +0000
                Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images [2 Attachments]

                 
                [Attachment(s) from Alastair Smith included below]
                not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front, my family were fishers there till 1920 then moved up the coast to fish when it pretty much died in the ferry....

                i attached a album page from a set that was marked broughty ferry, big houses, i only really know the streets by the coast, you might recognize it though......and attached the print from the hill showing some of the bigger houses in 1890......

                i have as it happens seen an early photo of building at harris academy prior to it being a school, but can't find it..........




                --- On Tue, 1/11/11, Edmund <edmundraphael@...> wrote:

                From: Edmund <edmundraphael@...>
                Subject: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images
                To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, 1 November, 2011, 9:25

                 

                Very many thanks to Alastair Smith for his picture shewing, many of the old images which brought back memories of the fairly rough areas of the town, where one walked with certain trepidation, in the 1940s and 50s. I used to look round the junk and antiques' shops in Overgate, Hawkhill and the narrow streets off both. However, our Saturday, morning trip began at the Craig Street Market, where clothes were sold in the main. Jean Sinclair was the perceived "diva" of the market, always full of conversation but not polite to everyone.

                I wonder if anyone has any photographic images of any of the Broughty Ferry, Victorian merchants' villas or mansion houses (not ones of Castleroy and Carbet Castle, which were produced in dozens)?
                One photograph eludes absolutely everyone and that is of "Ashcliff", which was built for Sir George Baxter and formerly occupied the site where now the Harris Academy stands.
                Make this something to remember and, either tell the group, if you find an image or send it to our very kind and professional City Archivist, Iain Flett.
                Lucky hunting.

                Edmund Raphael






              • Michael Bolik
                Hi all. We have been putting up an Image of the Week for the past few weeks now and this week s is an atmospheric shot of the Royal or Victoria Arch:
                Message 8 of 10 , Nov 4, 2011
                  Hi all.

                  We have been putting up an "Image of the Week" for the past few weeks now and this week's is an atmospheric shot of the Royal or Victoria Arch:

                  http://www.dundee.ac.uk/archives/peto_image_of_week.htm

                  All the images for the Image of the Week come from the Michael Peto Collection.

                  Michael

                  Michael Bolik
                  Senior Assistant Archivist
                  Archive Services
                  University of Dundee
                  Dundee DD1 4HN
                  United Kingdom
                  tel. +44 (0)1382 384095
                  fax. +44 (0)1382 385523
                  http://www.dundee.ac.uk/archives



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                • PATRICIA PARKER
                  Their money; their rules until World War II. Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com From: edmundraphael@googlemail.com Date: Fri,
                  Message 9 of 10 , Nov 4, 2011
                    Their money; their rules until World War II.

                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                    Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


                     

                    To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                    From: edmundraphael@...
                    Date: Fri, 4 Nov 2011 11:04:56 +0000
                    Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

                     
                    The language in common with the two (or four) countries has interpretation and pronunciation problems, mainly because of regional accents and lazy enunciation.
                    As with too many changes resultant of the years of change, which followed World War II, lambasting "BBC English", "Oxford Accent" and the 'speaking with a plumb in one's mouth' silly-Billy, inferiority complex was the popular thing to do, in the equality drive towards mass commonality. Simple as that, and it continues.
                    Those who were BBC broadcasters delivered their various messages to everyone, the country over. They wanted everyone to understand, so perfect enunciation was the required tool, especially when broadcasting meant radio.
                    University lecturers and, indeed, school teachers, required to speak with clarity for the  understanding of all.
                    Now, as I begin with deafness and have problems with understing alien expressions and words, this combined with regional accents and disregard for grammer, ever increasing person failure to comprehend is usual.
                     
                    Far too often forgotten, is the need to clearly transmit the message , perhaps purposely during a time when procrastination is in so much regular use. Slovenly written or spoken language causes misunderstanding and costly mistakes, oftentimes, perhaps, in hospitals for an example.
                     
                    My thought for today
                    Edmund R.
                     
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 6:32 PM
                    Subject: RE: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

                     

                    I believe this all relates back to the comments against Alistair about his antique photos of Dundee.
                     
                    My pet peeve is the use of "like" instead of "as".  My husband used to hate it when people called something very or really unique since if something is unique, it needs no adjectives.  However, we must take into consideration that you and I are discussing that language which divides our two English speaking countries.  Oh, oh, I must take the lift as I have a ladder in my silk.
                     
                    Take care,
                     
                    Pat

                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                    Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


                     

                    To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                    From: edmundraphael@...
                    Date: Thu, 3 Nov 2011 11:50:48 +0000
                    Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

                     
                    I never knew much about Aberdeen but well remember the accent. The Shore Porters Society of Virginia Street, used to move furniture for me for many years, until I came to live in the south west of England, exactly half a lifetime since.
                     
                    I had a very good teacher of English language, my mother's cousin, who was a retired lecturer in that subject, for many years at La Sorbonne. In most cases, pronunciation requires the speaker to know the spelling of each word, which is a huge help in almost all instances. My 'pet hates'
                    pertaining to bad pronunciation begin with Febury, Secetary, Indiar (especially the English) Vunrable and I insist on the Scots pronunciation of Proven (not Prove en)
                     
                    Now, what was all this about!
                     
                    Best wishes
                    Edmund R----- Original Message -----
                    Sent: Thursday, November 03, 2011 1:07 AM
                    Subject: RE: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images

                     

                    My mother was born in Aberdeen, but her mother was born in Dundee, and I grew up hearing many stories about Dundee.  I also grew up with my Nany's broad accent, and I credit hearing that with being to understand just about any accent from anywhere in the world.  My hint is: listen to the English behind the accent.  It works all the time.

                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                    Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


                     

                    To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                    From: alastair_smithuk@...
                    Date: Wed, 2 Nov 2011 00:55:40 +0000
                    Subject: Re: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images [2 Attachments]

                     
                    [Attachment(s) from Alastair Smith included below]
                    not so much of the mansions on the hill in broughty ferry, hundreds of the town and houses along sea front, my family were fishers there till 1920 then moved up the coast to fish when it pretty much died in the ferry....

                    i attached a album page from a set that was marked broughty ferry, big houses, i only really know the streets by the coast, you might recognize it though......and attached the print from the hill showing some of the bigger houses in 1890......

                    i have as it happens seen an early photo of building at harris academy prior to it being a school, but can't find it..........




                    --- On Tue, 1/11/11, Edmund <edmundraphael@...> wrote:

                    From: Edmund <edmundraphael@...>
                    Subject: [dundee-history] Old Photographic Images
                    To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Tuesday, 1 November, 2011, 9:25

                     

                    Very many thanks to Alastair Smith for his picture shewing, many of the old images which brought back memories of the fairly rough areas of the town, where one walked with certain trepidation, in the 1940s and 50s. I used to look round the junk and antiques' shops in Overgate, Hawkhill and the narrow streets off both. However, our Saturday, morning trip began at the Craig Street Market, where clothes were sold in the main. Jean Sinclair was the perceived "diva" of the market, always full of conversation but not polite to everyone.

                    I wonder if anyone has any photographic images of any of the Broughty Ferry, Victorian merchants' villas or mansion houses (not ones of Castleroy and Carbet Castle, which were produced in dozens)?
                    One photograph eludes absolutely everyone and that is of "Ashcliff", which was built for Sir George Baxter and formerly occupied the site where now the Harris Academy stands.
                    Make this something to remember and, either tell the group, if you find an image or send it to our very kind and professional City Archivist, Iain Flett.
                    Lucky hunting.

                    Edmund Raphael









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