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[dundee-history] Stovies

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  • jtaylor@netcom.ca
    Ah-Dundee Stoved Potatoes! This delectable dish that changed in how it was made,street by street and town by town. I believe the basic ingredients in Dundee
    Message 1 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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      Ah-Dundee Stoved Potatoes!
      This delectable dish that changed in how it was
      made,street by street and town by town. I believe
      the basic ingredients in Dundee were
      Onions/Corned Beef/Spuds and Bisto,but what about
      the rest of Scotland? Many a discussion we have had
      about this dish-on how it was prepared, its ingredients
      and of course from the West Coast crowd<how theres were
      better than ours .

      John Taylor


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    • Babara P Jameson
      What is bisto? Barbara Jameson List manager: JAMESON and MOLSBERRY ... eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/dundee-history http://www.egroups.com -
      Message 2 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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        What is bisto?

        Barbara Jameson
        List manager: JAMESON and MOLSBERRY

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      • Nathan C ornfoot
        Bisto is a commercial gravy thickener. There used to be an advert Aaah Bisto with kids smelling the aroma from the pot of stew. Also available in Canada,
        Message 3 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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          Bisto is a commercial gravy thickener. There used to be an advert "Aaah
          Bisto" with kids smelling the aroma from the pot of stew. Also available in
          Canada, in fact I just used it in a lamb stew.
          Nat Cornfoot.

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Babara P Jameson <marksnana@...>
          To: <dundee-history@egroups.com>
          Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 3:08 PM
          Subject: [dundee-history] Re: Stovies


          > What is bisto?
          >
          > Barbara Jameson
          > List manager: JAMESON and MOLSBERRY
          >
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        • Nathan C ornfoot
          Stovies, as far as I m aware, was originally made from the dripping from a Sunday roast. If no roast, it could be made from any scraps of meat, or just gravy
          Message 4 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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            Stovies, as far as I'm aware, was originally made from the dripping from a
            Sunday roast. If no roast, it could be made from any scraps of meat, or just
            gravy alone.
            Nat Cornfoot.

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: <jtaylor@...>
            To: <dundee-history@egroups.com>
            Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 12:45 PM
            Subject: [dundee-history] Stovies


            > Ah-Dundee Stoved Potatoes!
            > This delectable dish that changed in how it was
            > made,street by street and town by town. I believe
            > the basic ingredients in Dundee were
            > Onions/Corned Beef/Spuds and Bisto,but what about
            > the rest of Scotland? Many a discussion we have had
            > about this dish-on how it was prepared, its ingredients
            > and of course from the West Coast crowd<how theres were
            > better than ours .
            >
            > John Taylor
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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            >
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            >
            >
            >
            >


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          • Babara P Jameson
            Thanks! Barbara Jameson ... eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/dundee-history http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
            Message 5 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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              Thanks!

              Barbara Jameson

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            • Eileen@j51.com
              Barbara: It s artificial coloring and flavoring, used to make bad gravy look like real home-made gravy. Instead of taking the time to make a roux from browned
              Message 6 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                Barbara:

                It's artificial coloring and flavoring, used to make bad
                gravy look like real home-made gravy. Instead of taking the
                time to make a roux from browned pan drippings and flour,
                some would use a prepared mix called Bisto. The American
                equivalent is Gravy Master. Really horrible stuff!

                Eileen

                >What is bisto?
                >
                >Barbara Jameson
                >List manager: JAMESON and MOLSBERRY



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              • Grant E. L. Buttars
                My mother and grandmother made stovies from potatoes, onions, and real beef dripping from the butcher. Any prepacked cooking fat was not acceptable, nor was
                Message 7 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                  My mother and grandmother made stovies from potatoes, onions, and real beef
                  dripping from the butcher. Any prepacked cooking fat was not acceptable,
                  nor was the use of corned beef in this item. They may have used Bisto but
                  I'm not sure.

                  Grant Buttars
                  (Dundee Scotland)
                  http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~gbuttars/
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Nathan C ornfoot <natco@...>
                  To: <dundee-history@egroups.com>
                  Sent: 26 June 1999 23:02
                  Subject: [dundee-history] Re: Stovies


                  > Stovies, as far as I'm aware, was originally made from the dripping from a
                  > Sunday roast. If no roast, it could be made from any scraps of meat, or
                  just
                  > gravy alone.
                  > Nat Cornfoot.
                  >
                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: <jtaylor@...>
                  > To: <dundee-history@egroups.com>
                  > Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 12:45 PM
                  > Subject: [dundee-history] Stovies
                  >
                  >
                  > > Ah-Dundee Stoved Potatoes!
                  > > This delectable dish that changed in how it was
                  > > made,street by street and town by town. I believe
                  > > the basic ingredients in Dundee were
                  > > Onions/Corned Beef/Spuds and Bisto,but what about
                  > > the rest of Scotland? Many a discussion we have had
                  > > about this dish-on how it was prepared, its ingredients
                  > > and of course from the West Coast crowd<how theres were
                  > > better than ours .
                  > >
                  > > John Taylor
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                  > > Listen to Britany spears and more top artisits
                  > > now at audiohighway.com!
                  > > http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/395
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/dundee-history
                  > > http://www.egroups.com - Simplifying group communications
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
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                • JMryle@aol.com
                  In a message dated 6/26/99 12:48:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time, jtaylor@netcom.ca writes:
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                    In a message dated 6/26/99 12:48:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
                    jtaylor@... writes:

                    << Ah-Dundee Stoved Potatoes!
                    This delectable dish that changed in how it was
                    made,street by street and town by town. I believe
                    the basic ingredients in Dundee were
                    Onions/Corned Beef/Spuds and Bisto, >>

                    Hi John,

                    Could you tell me what Bisto is?

                    Norma

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                  • jackgove
                    hey nat, the reason there was no corned beef in the stovies, was in these days, it was only toffs that could afford corn-beef. jack. ...
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                      hey nat, the reason there was no corned beef in the stovies, was
                      in these days, it was only toffs that could afford corn-beef.
                      jack.


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                    • Nathan C ornfoot
                      Jack aint that the truth Nat. ... From: jackgove To: Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 10:04 PM Subject:
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                        Jack
                        aint that the truth
                        Nat.

                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: jackgove <scotia@...>
                        To: <dundee-history@egroups.com>
                        Sent: Saturday, June 26, 1999 10:04 PM
                        Subject: [dundee-history] Re: Stovies


                        > hey nat, the reason there was no corned beef in the stovies,
                        was
                        > in these days, it was only toffs that could afford corn-beef.
                        > jack.
                        >
                        >
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                      • Babara P Jameson
                        Thanks. Sounds gross. But then, when I make gravy, I make it from scratch . Barbara ... eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/dundee-history
                        Message 11 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                          Thanks. Sounds gross. But then, when I make gravy, I make it from
                          "scratch".

                          Barbara

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                        • John Taylor
                          I am led to believe it is a consentrated beef flavoured co-agulant. John Taylor ... Barbara Jameson List manager: JAMESON and MOLSBERRY ... eGroups.com home:
                          Message 12 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                            I am led to believe it is a consentrated beef flavoured co-agulant.

                            John Taylor

                            Babara P Jameson wrote:

                             
                            What is bisto?
                            
                            Barbara Jameson
                            List manager:  JAMESON and MOLSBERRY

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                          • John Taylor
                            I knew when I started this Stovie thread that the BISTO thing would upset the gourmet cooks on the list,but the product must have served its purpose at the
                            Message 13 of 21 , Jun 26, 1999
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                              I knew when I started this Stovie thread that the BISTO thing would
                              upset the gourmet cooks on the list,but the product must have served
                              its purpose at the grass roots level of la haute cusine Dundee style!
                              I suppose a working chap looking for his supper could not care less!

                              John Taylor

                              "Eileen@..." wrote:

                               
                              Barbara:
                              
                              It's artificial coloring and flavoring, used to make bad
                              gravy look like real home-made gravy. Instead of taking the
                              time to make a roux from browned pan drippings and flour,
                              some would use a prepared mix called Bisto.  The American
                              equivalent is Gravy Master.  Really horrible stuff!
                              
                              Eileen
                              
                              >What is bisto?
                              >
                              >Barbara Jameson
                              >List manager:  JAMESON and MOLSBERRY
                              
                              
                              

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                            • Russ Laidlaw
                              Bisto is a powdered gravy mix aaahhhhhh Bistow : ... eGroups.com home: http://www.egroups.com/group/dundee-history http://www.egroups.com -
                              Message 14 of 21 , Jun 27, 1999
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                                Bisto is a powdered gravy mix "aaahhhhhh Bistow :"

                                Babara P Jameson wrote:

                                > What is bisto?
                                >
                                > Barbara Jameson
                                > List manager: JAMESON and MOLSBERRY
                                >
                                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                > FreeShop is the #1 place for free and trial offers and great deals!
                                > Try something new and discover more ways to save!
                                > http://clickhere.egroups.com/click/381
                                >
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                              • chris826911
                                Edmund, you asked about stovies. I think most Scots have had stovies at one time or another, and I have fond memories of them, although I haven t made them for
                                Message 15 of 21 , Oct 8, 2013
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                                  Edmund, you asked about stovies. I think most Scots have had stovies at one time or another, and I have fond memories of them, although I haven't made them for years. It is possible you weren't mistaken when you saw Goodfellow and Stevens advertising them, a lot of bakers include them in their cafes or carry out sections. It is Frosts in Montrose that make them, but only in the winter months. As for how you make them, it is important to remember that there are brown stovies and white stovies.

                                  I have only ever made white stovies and the only time I ever had brown stovies they reminded me of Irish Stew. To make white stovies you need a good blob of dripping (hard to get nowadays), If you can't get dripping, lard is the next best thing, and if you're really stuck use cooking oil if you have to. Okay, melt the dripping in a pot. Add onions (a lot), I usually put in 2 or 3 very large ones. Brown the onions, add peeled and sliced potatoes, enough for 3 or 4 servings (remember they shrink in the cooking). Give the mixture a good stir and add boiling water, but only enough to stop the potatoes sticking to the bottom of the pan. If you put too much in you'll land up with slops or soup. You shouldn't really be able to see the water. Cook over a low heat stirring every few minutes, if you think the water has dried up put in one or two drops more (notice I said drops not spoonfuls). It is ready when the potatoes resemble mush, but if it's wet mush you've used too much water. Serve with slices of corned beef and a bannock or oatcake. Some people like to put the corned beef in the pot with the potatoes and onion, and some folks put in the remains of the weekend roast beef. I like mine just potatoes and onion.

                                  Our mums used to make stovies to eek out the week's meat ration and use up leftovers.

                                  Chris Longuir

                                  http://www.chrislongmuir.co.uk
                                • Edmund Raphael
                                  I didn t know that there were white and brown stovies but from what you say, I must have had the brown, as they were cooked from the solidified dripping
                                  Message 16 of 21 , Oct 9, 2013
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                                    I didn't know that there were "white" and "brown" stovies but from what you say, I must have had the brown, as they were cooked from the solidified dripping from a roast, which always had a gravy on the top. Thanks to all; I'm to have a go, this Saturday!
                                    Edmund R
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Tuesday, October 08, 2013 5:43 PM
                                    Subject: [dundee-history] Stovies

                                     

                                    Edmund, you asked about stovies. I think most Scots have had stovies at one time or another, and I have fond memories of them, although I haven't made them for years. It is possible you weren't mistaken when you saw Goodfellow and Stevens advertising them, a lot of bakers include them in their cafes or carry out sections. It is Frosts in Montrose that make them, but only in the winter months. As for how you make them, it is important to remember that there are brown stovies and white stovies.

                                    I have only ever made white stovies and the only time I ever had brown stovies they reminded me of Irish Stew. To make white stovies you need a good blob of dripping (hard to get nowadays), If you can't get dripping, lard is the next best thing, and if you're really stuck use cooking oil if you have to. Okay, melt the dripping in a pot. Add onions (a lot), I usually put in 2 or 3 very large ones. Brown the onions, add peeled and sliced potatoes, enough for 3 or 4 servings (remember they shrink in the cooking). Give the mixture a good stir and add boiling water, but only enough to stop the potatoes sticking to the bottom of the pan. If you put too much in you'll land up with slops or soup. You shouldn't really be able to see the water. Cook over a low heat stirring every few minutes, if you think the water has dried up put in one or two drops more (notice I said drops not spoonfuls). It is ready when the potatoes resemble mush, but if it's wet mush you've used too much water. Serve with slices of corned beef and a bannock or oatcake. Some people like to put the corned beef in the pot with the potatoes and onion, and some folks put in the remains of the weekend roast beef. I like mine just potatoes and onion.

                                    Our mums used to make stovies to eek out the week's meat ration and use up leftovers.

                                    Chris Longuir

                                    http://www.chrislongmuir.co.uk

                                  • Jenny Blain
                                    Dear all, I remember stovies well from when I worked in Dundee -Kidds in Reform Street used to sell stovies in a bun as a take-out at lunchtime. Also remember
                                    Message 17 of 21 , Oct 9, 2013
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                                      Dear all,
                                      I remember stovies well from when I worked in Dundee -Kidds in Reform
                                      Street used to sell stovies in a bun as a take-out at lunchtime. Also
                                      remember my mother talking about them. To me they are potatoes and
                                      onions cooked in a stove-top pan, with some fat of any kind and whatever
                                      else you have to hand, meat or vegetable. I quite often make a veggie
                                      version and serve with cheese, or put in left-over meat if any.

                                      If you've done a roast, can use the fat and gravy from that.

                                      Best,
                                      Jenny
                                    • smithd11220
                                      The browning of stovies came from colouring the onions well in the beef dripping before the diced spuds and water went into the saucepan - and that s how we do
                                      Message 18 of 21 , Oct 20, 2013
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                                        The browning of stovies came from colouring the onions well in the beef dripping before the diced spuds and water went into the saucepan - and that's how we do them to this day.  My late Ma's recipe ends 'do not leave kitchen because burnt stovies no good'.  So in our house, it took an Essex girl to get them right.



                                        ---In dundee-history@yahoogroups.com, <dundee-history@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                        I didn't know that there were "white" and "brown" stovies but from what you say, I must have had the brown, as they were cooked from the solidified dripping from a roast, which always had a gravy on the top. Thanks to all; I'm to have a go, this Saturday!
                                        Edmund R
                                        ----- Original Message -----
                                        Sent: Tuesday, October 08, 2013 5:43 PM
                                        Subject: [dundee-history] Stovies

                                         

                                        Edmund, you asked about stovies. I think most Scots have had stovies at one time or another, and I have fond memories of them, although I haven't made them for years. It is possible you weren't mistaken when you saw Goodfellow and Stevens advertising them, a lot of bakers include them in their cafes or carry out sections. It is Frosts in Montrose that make them, but only in the winter months. As for how you make them, it is important to remember that there are brown stovies and white stovies.

                                        I have only ever made white stovies and the only time I ever had brown stovies they reminded me of Irish Stew. To make white stovies you need a good blob of dripping (hard to get nowadays), If you can't get dripping, lard is the next best thing, and if you're really stuck use cooking oil if you have to. Okay, melt the dripping in a pot. Add onions (a lot), I usually put in 2 or 3 very large ones. Brown the onions, add peeled and sliced potatoes, enough for 3 or 4 servings (remember they shrink in the cooking). Give the mixture a good stir and add boiling water, but only enough to stop the potatoes sticking to the bottom of the pan. If you put too much in you'll land up with slops or soup. You shouldn't really be able to see the water. Cook over a low heat stirring every few minutes, if you think the water has dried up put in one or two drops more (notice I said drops not spoonfuls). It is ready when the potatoes resemble mush, but if it's wet mush you've used too much water. Serve with slices of corned beef and a bannock or oatcake. Some people like to put the corned beef in the pot with the potatoes and onion, and some folks put in the remains of the weekend roast beef. I like mine just potatoes and onion.

                                        Our mums used to make stovies to eek out the week's meat ration and use up leftovers.

                                        Chris Longuir

                                        http://www.chrislongmuir.co.uk

                                      • Edmund Raphael
                                        VERY MANY THANKS for this information. The longest running topic I think we have had, but it will lead to a VERY tasty ending. Edmund Raphael ... From:
                                        Message 19 of 21 , Oct 20, 2013
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                                          VERY MANY THANKS for this information.
                                          The longest running topic I think we have had, but it will lead to a VERY tasty ending.
                                           
                                          Edmund Raphael
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          Sent: Sunday, October 20, 2013 4:36 PM
                                          Subject: RE: Re: [dundee-history] Stovies

                                           

                                          The browning of stovies came from colouring the onions well in the beef dripping before the diced spuds and water went into the saucepan - and that's how we do them to this day.  My late Ma's recipe ends 'do not leave kitchen because burnt stovies no good'.  So in our house, it took an Essex girl to get them right.



                                          ---In dundee-history@yahoogroups.com, <dundee-history@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                          I didn't know that there were "white" and "brown" stovies but from what you say, I must have had the brown, as they were cooked from the solidified dripping from a roast, which always had a gravy on the top. Thanks to all; I'm to have a go, this Saturday!
                                          Edmund R
                                          ----- Original Message -----
                                          Sent: Tuesday, October 08, 2013 5:43 PM
                                          Subject: [dundee-history] Stovies

                                           

                                          Edmund, you asked about stovies. I think most Scots have had stovies at one time or another, and I have fond memories of them, although I haven't made them for years. It is possible you weren't mistaken when you saw Goodfellow and Stevens advertising them, a lot of bakers include them in their cafes or carry out sections. It is Frosts in Montrose that make them, but only in the winter months. As for how you make them, it is important to remember that there are brown stovies and white stovies.

                                          I have only ever made white stovies and the only time I ever had brown stovies they reminded me of Irish Stew. To make white stovies you need a good blob of dripping (hard to get nowadays), If you can't get dripping, lard is the next best thing, and if you're really stuck use cooking oil if you have to. Okay, melt the dripping in a pot. Add onions (a lot), I usually put in 2 or 3 very large ones. Brown the onions, add peeled and sliced potatoes, enough for 3 or 4 servings (remember they shrink in the cooking). Give the mixture a good stir and add boiling water, but only enough to stop the potatoes sticking to the bottom of the pan. If you put too much in you'll land up with slops or soup. You shouldn't really be able to see the water. Cook over a low heat stirring every few minutes, if you think the water has dried up put in one or two drops more (notice I said drops not spoonfuls). It is ready when the potatoes resemble mush, but if it's wet mush you've used too much water. Serve with slices of corned beef and a bannock or oatcake. Some people like to put the corned beef in the pot with the potatoes and onion, and some folks put in the remains of the weekend roast beef. I like mine just potatoes and onion.

                                          Our mums used to make stovies to eek out the week's meat ration and use up leftovers.

                                          Chris Longuir

                                          http://www.chrislongmuir.co.uk

                                        • Chris Longmuir
                                          I always considered the stovies made with onions browned in the dripping to be white stovies. The brown stovies I had experience of had gravy browning added
                                          Message 20 of 21 , Oct 20, 2013
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                                            I always considered the stovies made with onions browned in the dripping to be white stovies. The brown stovies I had experience of had gravy browning added which made them to my mind, like Irish stew.

                                             

                                             

                                          • PATRICIA PARKER
                                            If you put the onions in with butter or olive oil (if you want to be healthier), they will turn brown as they carmelize. Then you can put in the taties. See,
                                            Message 21 of 21 , Oct 20, 2013
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                                              If you put the onions in with butter or olive oil (if you want to be healthier), they will turn brown as they carmelize.  Then you can put in the taties.  See, our moms and grans knew how to do gourmet cooking before there was a word for it.  All I know is that when people complain about British cooking, I tell them "you have never had British cooking".

                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                               
                                              Starve the Fear; Feed the Faith! 


                                               

                                              To: dundee-history@yahoogroups.com
                                              From: smithd11220@...
                                              Date: Sun, 20 Oct 2013 08:36:20 -0700
                                              Subject: RE: Re: [dundee-history] Stovies

                                               

                                              The browning of stovies came from colouring the onions well in the beef dripping before the diced spuds and water went into the saucepan - and that's how we do them to this day.  My late Ma's recipe ends 'do not leave kitchen because burnt stovies no good'.  So in our house, it took an Essex girl to get them right.



                                              ---In dundee-history@yahoogroups.com, <dundee-history@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                                              I didn't know that there were "white" and "brown" stovies but from what you say, I must have had the brown, as they were cooked from the solidified dripping from a roast, which always had a gravy on the top. Thanks to all; I'm to have a go, this Saturday!
                                              Edmund R
                                              ----- Original Message -----
                                              Sent: Tuesday, October 08, 2013 5:43 PM
                                              Subject: [dundee-history] Stovies

                                               
                                              Edmund, you asked about stovies. I think most Scots have had stovies at one time or another, and I have fond memories of them, although I haven't made them for years. It is possible you weren't mistaken when you saw Goodfellow and Stevens advertising them, a lot of bakers include them in their cafes or carry out sections. It is Frosts in Montrose that make them, but only in the winter months. As for how you make them, it is important to remember that there are brown stovies and white stovies.

                                              I have only ever made white stovies and the only time I ever had brown stovies they reminded me of Irish Stew. To make white stovies you need a good blob of dripping (hard to get nowadays), If you can't get dripping, lard is the next best thing, and if you're really stuck use cooking oil if you have to. Okay, melt the dripping in a pot. Add onions (a lot), I usually put in 2 or 3 very large ones. Brown the onions, add peeled and sliced potatoes, enough for 3 or 4 servings (remember they shrink in the cooking). Give the mixture a good stir and add boiling water, but only enough to stop the potatoes sticking to the bottom of the pan. If you put too much in you'll land up with slops or soup. You shouldn't really be able to see the water. Cook over a low heat stirring every few minutes, if you think the water has dried up put in one or two drops more (notice I said drops not spoonfuls). It is ready when the potatoes resemble mush, but if it's wet mush you've used too much water. Serve with slices of corned beef and a bannock or oatcake. Some people like to put the corned beef in the pot with the potatoes and onion, and some folks put in the remains of the weekend roast beef. I like mine just potatoes and onion.

                                              Our mums used to make stovies to eek out the week's meat ration and use up leftovers.

                                              Chris Longuir

                                              http://www.chrislongmuir.co.uk



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