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Re: [dundee-history] Dundee Provosts

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  • Xantheand@aol.com
    Hi Janice Thanks for the War story SUe [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 23, 2004
      Hi Janice

      Thanks for the "War story"

      SUe


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jim Robertson
      Janice N recently wrote about City dignitaries, and the Yeaman family in particular. I gave her some information and promised to dig into my Municipal
      Message 2 of 8 , Nov 14, 2004
        Janice N' recently wrote about City dignitaries, and the Yeaman family in
        particular.

        I gave her some information and promised to dig into my "Municipal history
        of Dundee" published in 1878.

        I have now been through this sizeable book, which has no Index, and have
        found references to the Yeaman family, whilst performing duties as Bailies,
        or Provosts, over many years. Some refer to the election of Common
        Councillors in 1716, -James Yeaman, and to George Yeaman , Merchant,
        serving on an enquiry into the misuse of Election Tickets in 1716. pp. 97
        & 99.

        It is noted that George Yeaman of Gowrie had been the MP for Dundee, from
        the end of the 17th century, into the early part of the 18th century, when
        the Act of Union between Scotland and England was enacted.

        One amusing incident in 1712 records GeorgeYeaman , whilst Provost,
        dispensing justice to four vagabond women, who were removed from the
        town! p. 101

        The earliest reference is to David Yeaman , in 1652, being made partially
        responsible for the protection of the Overgate area, as General Monk was
        about to attack and later desolate the town. p.269

        In 1872, the Town Council, led by Provosty James Yeaman donated a new bell
        for the new "Peal of Bells" following a fire at the old City Churches in
        1841. This new bell was th F sharp bell, which weighed in at 14
        cwt. pp.205/6.

        There are a few other incidents recorded, some leading up to the
        establishment of the family home at Murie in the Carse of Gowrie.

        If Janice is interested, I could make extracts of some of these incidents,
        and send them to her in Australia, where I also live.

        Jimmie Robertson
      • Jim Robertson
        Robin Hallam wrote to the Group - James Yeaman was still Provost of Dundee on 10 June 1872 when he attended a function at Lambs Hotel and after giving an 800
        Message 3 of 8 , Nov 14, 2004
          Robin Hallam wrote to the Group -

          James Yeaman was still Provost of Dundee on 10 June 1872 when he
          attended a function at Lambs Hotel and after giving an 800 word
          speech, presented 15 awards to a number of Dundee ironworkers.

          The function was a gathering of the Amalgamated Ironworkers of
          Dundee to commemorate the peaceful settlement of a strike four or
          five months previous that had the workers out for about a
          fortnight. The workers achieved a work week that was from 7:00AM -
          5:00PM Monday to Friday and 7:00AM - 1:00PM on Saturday. The
          assembly was served tea followed by five speeches including that of
          Provost Yeaman, then the presentations and followed by "several
          songs by Miss Sturrock and a number of duets by Messrs. Johnston and
          Ford".

          I know about that evening at Lambs Hotel because my g-grandfather
          Robert Ireland Robb was Secretary of the Amalgamated Ironworkers and
          was presented that evening with a writing desk by Provost Yeaman
          which I still have in my possession. The inscription on a brass
          plate inlaid in the desk includes the words "their appreciation of
          his services during the struggle for the 51 hours".

          Robin Hallam
          Duncan British Columbia


          PS I have an contemporary account of that evening from the Dundee
          Advertiser that includes word for word all the speeches and the
          details of the presentations. I would send a copy to anyone
          interested.

          Send any requests to the Group.
        • Ken Anton
          Hello, Jim s recent post mentioned the bells in St. Mary s Tower (The Old Steeple). The tower and Steeple Church survived the 1841 fire, but the cross kirk
          Message 4 of 8 , Nov 17, 2004
            Hello,

            Jim's recent post mentioned the bells in St. Mary's Tower (The Old Steeple).

            The tower and Steeple Church survived the 1841 fire, but the cross kirk (now
            the Slessor Centre) and east kirk (St. Mary's) did not.

            The bell tower has a peal of 8 bells, hung for full-circle ringing. There
            are also some old bells on display in the Antiquities Room in the tower, but
            these are much older than the working set.

            There are eight bells tuned to a complete octave, ranging from the treble
            (highest note) weighing 287 kg (5cwt 2qtr 17lbs) to the tenor (lowest note)
            at 995 kg (19cwt 2qtr 10lbs).

            The Tenor bell was cast in 1819 by Thomas Mears at the Whitechapel Bell
            Foundry in London, the other seven bells were cast in 1872 by the same
            foundry, now called Mears & Stainbank. This is the foundry which also
            manufactured "Big Ben", in the Houses of Parliament clock-tower in London,
            and the USA's Liberty Bell.

            Jim wrote:
            >> In 1872, the Town Council, led by Provost James Yeaman donated a new bell
            for the new "Peal of Bells" following a fire at the old City Churches in
            1841. This new bell was the F sharp bell, which weighed in at 14 cwt.
            pp.205/6.

            The bells are tuned to an octave in E, so I think this would be the 7th,
            being F#.

            The bells are rung every Sunday and also week-day practice nights: contact
            information, for anyone who would like to try it:
            http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~saelwell/bell1.htm

            Go on, it's great fun!

            Best regards

            Ken
          • gray1720
            I d love to have a go, Ken, but it s long old stretch of the rope from Dundee to Oxford! However I did hear them when I was in Dundee in 2000, and was most
            Message 5 of 8 , Nov 18, 2004
              I'd love to have a go, Ken, but it's long old stretch of the rope
              from Dundee to Oxford! However I did hear them when I was in Dundee
              in 2000, and was most impressed by the sound. They did not seem to be
              ringing full circle, but were chiming a hymn tune, using four bells
              (I think - I am to tune and rhythm what Long John Silver was to
              ballroom dancing!). Maddeningly, I can't remember the hymn either.

              Hopefully one of these days my girlfriend and I will come up to
              Dundee ancestor-chasing and drop by on practice night. Have you got a
              real ale pub (the essential adjunct to ringing!) to go to afterwards?

              Adrian


              --- In dundee-history@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Anton" <ken.anton@t...>
              wrote:
              > Hello,
              >
              > Jim's recent post mentioned the bells in St. Mary's Tower (The Old
              Steeple).
              >
              > The tower and Steeple Church survived the 1841 fire, but the cross
              kirk (now
              > the Slessor Centre) and east kirk (St. Mary's) did not.
              >
              > The bell tower has a peal of 8 bells, hung for full-circle
              ringing. There
              > are also some old bells on display in the Antiquities Room in the
              tower, but
              > these are much older than the working set.
              >
              > There are eight bells tuned to a complete octave, ranging from the
              treble
              > (highest note) weighing 287 kg (5cwt 2qtr 17lbs) to the tenor
              (lowest note)
              > at 995 kg (19cwt 2qtr 10lbs).
              >
              > The Tenor bell was cast in 1819 by Thomas Mears at the Whitechapel
              Bell
              > Foundry in London, the other seven bells were cast in 1872 by the
              same
              > foundry, now called Mears & Stainbank. This is the foundry which
              also
              > manufactured "Big Ben", in the Houses of Parliament clock-tower in
              London,
              > and the USA's Liberty Bell.
              >
              > Jim wrote:
              > >> In 1872, the Town Council, led by Provost James Yeaman donated a
              new bell
              > for the new "Peal of Bells" following a fire at the old City
              Churches in
              > 1841. This new bell was the F sharp bell, which weighed in at 14
              cwt.
              > pp.205/6.
              >
              > The bells are tuned to an octave in E, so I think this would be the
              7th,
              > being F#.
              >
              > The bells are rung every Sunday and also week-day practice nights:
              contact
              > information, for anyone who would like to try it:
              > http://www.personal.dundee.ac.uk/~saelwell/bell1.htm
              >
              > Go on, it's great fun!
              >
              > Best regards
              >
              > Ken
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