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Re: [dre-talk] Re: saints

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  • Hickey Penny
    Beth, Thanks! Good ideas for saints! Penny ... __________________________________ Yahoo! Mail Mobile Take Yahoo! Mail with you! Check email on your mobile
    Message 1 of 8 , Jul 1, 2005
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      Beth, Thanks! Good ideas for saints!
      Penny

      --- oddsyntax@... wrote:

      > We have a 3 Kings party on the Sunday after New
      > Years, and build 'mangers'
      > (really a gingerbread type house) from ice cream
      > cones and frosting and graham
      > crackers and candy; sing the Posadas; we did a
      > treasure hunt in the church
      > this year; next year plan a French traditional
      > cake. We usually give out party
      > favors too. I also put out coloring pages
      > throughout the year for the
      > youngsters in the parish, usually saint-oriented or
      > lectionary oriented.
      >
      > I was thinking this over yesterday; one year when I
      > taught I had the
      > children make icons and I assigned saints, and they
      > were also able to choose one
      > (three each). We used acrylic paints and worked
      > slowly and prayerfully; if they
      > made errors, they had to work with them (God doesn't
      > throw you out! He
      > works with you.) They researched the iconography
      > and taught their saints'
      > stories to one another. We glued magnets to the
      > back, and while they worked I
      > lectured and they seemed to listen. At the end of
      > the year, one girl insisted
      > the class make icons of the first communion
      > candidates, so we took pictures and
      > surprised them with beautiful momentos. Then I
      > learned I was supposed to
      > haven been following the Archdiocesan curriculum.
      > Sigh.
      >
      > When you teach the saints I think it's important to
      > be clear about what you
      > want to show. They are wonderful heroes, and
      > children need heroes; they
      > represent so many different cultures and affirm
      > identities; the customs are very
      > amusing at times (I have an elderly aunt who was
      > dressed as Saint Anthony for
      > the year she was five!) but I was always hostile to
      > the pious goodness of
      > some of the literature, being very aware from an
      > early age of how bad I was.
      > So when I teach the saints I teach them as friends,
      > as models, as fellow
      > flawed creatures that show us God's magnificent
      > love. Some excel at one virtue,
      > some another, each fully developed in humanity.
      > That's the goal, which is
      > easier to take in than 'goodness' (simpler, and
      > much, much harder!). (Think
      > the cranky St. Jerome.)
      >
      > So if you want to celebrate the saints, I would
      > suggest looking to the
      > seasons, and looking at different aspects that a
      > feast could provide. Fall,
      > Winter, Spring, Summer. By Continent. By
      > Millenium. By gender. By custom. By
      > who is represented in your parish. I started
      > thinking about Saint Patrick,
      > for example, as a former slave, and how that might
      > be an interesting
      > association, especially if you have teens and an
      > area where St. Patrick's Day is a
      > drinking holiday. Plant clover. Have a saints fair
      > for All Saints Day, with
      > dress up and information, especially for the
      > confirmation, games, pamphlets,
      > contests, most unusual, longest name, most
      > unlikely, have the attendees vote and
      > winners get movie tickets for their brochures. You
      > could also tie service
      > projects to saints, especially to what they are
      > patrons of, and dedicate
      > activities to that saint.
      >
      > Sorry, I do ramble. Hope some of this is useful to
      > someone.
      >
      > Beth
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been
      > removed]
      >
      >




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    • oddsyntax@aol.com
      In a message dated 8/26/2005 10:00:30 AM Eastern Daylight Time, dre-talk@yahoogroups.com writes: Hi Everyone, I will be presenting a seminar on saints for
      Message 2 of 8 , Aug 26 8:31 AM
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        In a message dated 8/26/2005 10:00:30 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
        dre-talk@yahoogroups.com writes:

        Hi Everyone,
        I will be presenting a seminar on saints for every season and reason
        for our Catechists and I was wondering if anyone would like to share
        what they do for All Saints day, or how you incorporate Saints into
        your RE lessons, in prayer, plays etc. I will be presenting to
        elementary as well as junior high level catechists. It would be great
        to pass on to them what you do in classes or on RE nights. Any
        handouts would be great too.
        Thanks, I will make sure to place your name on the handouts if you
        send me any and your parish name too.
        Donna



        My program is small (30 at most grades 1-8) and I try to present a range of
        types of saints. I tell their stories in ways that interest me, starting
        from the ones represented in our parish, in the church if I can: Saint Anthony
        of Padua is the man who never got what he wanted (didn't like Augustinians,
        didn't get martyred, couldn't stay a hermit, couldn't even die in Padua), but
        got something better; Saint Therese of Lisieux is the one no one was nice to,
        and who learned to make every moment God's moment. Saint Joseph knew how to
        keep his mouth shut (not like John the Baptist's father!) John the Baptist
        is directly across from St. Anthony; both monastic saints, but so different in
        character, one gentle and quiet, one fierce, both preachers. I emphasize
        their diversity and their attributes, how St. Jude proudly wields the club of
        his martyrdom, the strangeness of the Infant of Prague, rich king and baby all
        at once; the message being that we have to hear God's voice as it comes to
        each one of us as we are. We understand their stories differently at
        different times; I tell them how different saints have had meaning to me at points in
        my life, different ones at different points; how God is always speaking to
        us; He will always be calling to each one of them. St. Bernadette (we have a
        Grotto) heard one message in the cave at Lourdes but a different one years
        later persecuted in the convent. Not all the saints were good (St. Jerome was
        a prickly person; St. Francis seems sort of crazy) but they are all God's;
        our flaws are our strengths.

        For November we did a prayer service weekly incorporating the Angelus with
        candle lighting at each Hail Mary, the St. Francis Prayer (Make me an
        instrument), a poem by St. John of the Cross, and a blessing attributed to St. Clare.
        This year I want to alternate this with more of a litany format, perhaps
        picking up a version of St. Patrick's breastplate (he's our archdiocesan
        patron).

        One year I had a group of 4th & 5th graders make icons. All year we made
        2x3 in paintings. I assigned each three saints, made them teach other other
        the main points of the story. We worked slowly and prayerfully, writing the
        icons. When a mistake was made, we as a group found a way to incorporate it
        into the design (since He works with our errors). These 4th & 5th graders
        worked with acrylic and ink, gold and silver and at the end made icons of
        themselves (the hardest). Most puzzled over what their attributes should be besides
        video games or soccer so I tried to help them see (you are always helpful to
        others, maybe a helping hand? you are so funny, a smile? you notice
        interesting things, draw an eye?) Then one girl proposed making icons of the first
        communion and confirmation class instead of herself and I said fine. We took
        pictures and she worked so hard to make them beautiful gifts for others.
        Afterwards we presented her with one of herself, saying her real gift was
        creativity.

        Contact me if you want any of my notes. We are trying to make this program
        more in keeping with our diocesan standards so I'll have less and less
        freedom by my own choice.

        Sorry to go on and on. As you see I love this the topic. Saints are our
        heroes!

        Beth









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      • All Saints
        All Saints day is our parish feast day. We have the students come dressed as their favorite saint and they process down the aisle with Father at the beginning
        Message 3 of 8 , Aug 26 10:53 AM
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          All Saints day is our parish feast day. We have the students come dressed
          as their favorite saint and they process down the aisle with Father at the
          beginning of Mass. They bow to the altar and then go sit with their parents
          for Mass. They also may wear their costumes to class on the Wednesday
          nearest the feast day.

          The students learn about various saints when they are in the "selection
          process" and then learn more in depth when they research their "chosen"
          saint and make their costume. All of the family members are usually
          involved. Some costumes are just fabric tied with twine others are more
          elaborate. I love to see them arrive !


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        • Felicia Wolf
          I think a core issue in dealing with patron saints is the meaning of name. In this day and age when quite a few of our students are named after soap opera
          Message 4 of 8 , Aug 27 4:19 PM
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            I think a core issue in dealing with patron saints is the meaning of name. In this day and age when quite a few of our students are named after soap opera beauties this becomes a challenge. I use the web site http://www.behindthename.com/ to find out the meaning of the names of my students. I do this so that we can begin to think about the importance of name.


            Felicia Wolf
            >>> oddsyntax@... 08/26/05 10:31 AM >>>
          • Dan1schwie@aol.com
            We have about two dozen windows in our older church of the saints. I ve suggested to the pastoral team that when the Saint s day comes up that we put up a
            Message 5 of 8 , Aug 29 6:16 AM
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              We have about two dozen windows in our older church of the saints. I've
              suggested to the pastoral team that when the Saint's day comes up that we put up
              a decorative altar the week before and after to the saint near his/her
              window. On the altar would be a votive candle, flowers, story of the saint to
              take home, prayer card, and even a possibility of lighting votive lights in ask
              the saint to pray with the family to the Lord. So many of our parents don't
              know the story and all of our children are weakly involved in catechesis. One
              has to use these visual opportunities. Our parish is called "All Saints"!

              It will take some time to organize and get this started among so many other
              things. It will most probably fall to the catechesis team rather than our
              liturgy and environment committee to get it done.

              Dan


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