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Re: 1st Reconciliation/1st Communion Retreat

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  • immaculatereled
    We ve put together our own Mini-Retreats [2 hour sessions] for Reconciliation and Eucharist. Reconciliation is based on the story of Zaccheus and includes five
    Message 1 of 9 , Feb 1, 2002
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      We've put together our own Mini-Retreats [2 hour sessions] for
      Reconciliation and Eucharist.
      Reconciliation is based on the story of Zaccheus and includes five
      stations. Station I: a story telling station with a dress-up trunk
      and props for children to act out the story themselves, having heard
      it. Station II: a meditation station themed as Zaccheus' interior
      monologue as he struggles to see Jesus and then is selected as
      host ... the children are given an activity page depicting the scene
      to color as they listen to the guided meditation. Station III: the
      children are served a meal such as Zaccheus would have served Jesus:
      this includes the typical foods of the times including a lentil stew
      [so far only the children of Italian descent eat this], a variety of
      fruits, olives, cheeses, flatbread and a barley "pudding" sweetened
      with honey, cinnamon, orange juice and almonds all washed down with
      grape juice "wine" or water. Station IV: An interactive examination
      of conscience in which the facilitator reads 15 scenarios and the
      children vote as to whether the people in the stories are breaking or
      keeping the Law of Love by holding up one of two paddles, one with a
      stiffened felt broken heart and the other with a stiffened felt whole
      heart. Station V: The children make a crucifix for their rooms using
      clothespin halves and a cardboard template.
      The purpose of the retreat is to build comfort levels with the
      sacrament - the first confession probably took place over a meal -
      and to emphasize the need for conversion [a change in behavior]as the
      appropriate response to Jesus' loving sacrifice and his unending
      mercy.
      For the Eucharist Mini-Retreat, we use the story of the Last Supper.
      Station I: A Storytelling station which concluded with the
      facilitator washing the children's feet emphasizing the message that
      Jesus set an example of how we are to "live out" the sacrament in
      loving service to others. Station II is a meditation station themed
      as St. Peter's interior monologue during the supper; the children are
      given an outline of the famous Da Vinci Last Supper and sets of water
      colors to help them focus as they listen to the guided meditation.
      Station III: The children participate in an abbreviated Passover
      meal, sampling the foods appearing on the Seder plate [except the
      lamb - my budget doesn't run to serving 90 lamb chops]as the
      significance of each food is explained. The facilitator runs through
      the questions and answers of the Seder meal, emphasizing the points
      at which Jesus blessed the bread and wine changing them into His Body
      & Blood. Station IV: Using a clear glass "chalice" [actually, a
      wine goblet] the facilitator demonstrates how the priest will mix
      just a few drops of water with the wine, representing how we [the
      water] are inextricably united to Jesus [the wine]in this sacrament.
      The children then make their own chalices of clay to take homeas a
      constant reminder of this union. Station V: the children make a
      bread dough which they take home to cook with the families' evening
      meals. They are given a prayer to say when they break bread as with
      their families. We do, of course, distinguish between the
      Eucharistic bread and the ordinary bread but we draw the parallel
      that both are shared within a faith community and both nurture love
      and service within those communities.
      Parent facilitators 'run' both theses retreats as their volunteer
      service to the program - we ask for one-two hours per year from each
      family. The catechists "do" traffic control and confirmation
      candidates assist at the stations and in the kitchen. The retreats
      are popular with parents and children ... indeed, some parents have
      expressed the wish that an entire years' academic program could be
      run along these highly interactive lines. So far, my creativity and
      my budget have not stretched to the development of such a curriculum.
      In any case, we charge a $5.00 fee for each student for each mini-
      retreat. This allows us to break even and not dip into general
      operating funds.
      Hope this helps.
      Regina
      Immaculate Conception
      Stony Point, NY
      Archdiocese of NY
    • Sheri Stritof
      I was planning on having a Seder Meal for our religious education kids and was referred to this paragraph on our Archdiocese s website. It really surprised
      Message 2 of 9 , Feb 1, 2002
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        I was planning on having a Seder Meal for our religious education kids and
        was referred to this paragraph on our Archdiocese's website. It really
        surprised me.... guess I have been out of the loop for awhile.

        Sheri
        Ocean Park, WA

        http://www.seattlearch.org/progserv/litguideeaster.htm
        Passover Seder. Parish liturgy planners should seriously evaluate the custom
        of celebrating the Jewish Seder meal within the context of Holy Week. We
        must recognize, as Christians, that the Eucharist is our holy ritual meal,
        and that we should refrain from appropriating the Jewish Passover Seder,
        which we cannot, in full conformity with our faith, celebrate without major
        and likely inadmissible adaptation. Healthy ecumenical relations require
        respect for the religious heritage of others and the integrity of their
        rituals. Roman Catholics, traditionally sensitive to any perceived abuse of
        their own sacred rites and symbols, should surely understand this. Likewise,
        we should not appropriate the Passover Seder and adapt it for our own
        purposes.
      • Debrah Butler
        Hello to all, Just joined the list and need some help. I was appointed to this job in July, well the Fr. who asked me to take it has been transfered and the
        Message 3 of 9 , Feb 2, 2002
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          Hello to all, Just joined the list and need some help. I was appointed to
          this job in July, well the Fr. who asked me to take it has been transfered
          and the new pastor wants a job description and a contract. Do any of you
          have contracts/job descriptions that you would be willing to share with me
          so that I might make one?? Thanks in advance, hope to learn lots and share
          what bits of knowledge I may have in an area.
          God Bless
          Deb
        • Karin Fredrickson
          Our Archdiocese of Milwaukee also discouraged us from having the Seder during Holy Week. However, they did encourage the dialog with the Jewish faith (we had a
          Message 4 of 9 , Feb 4, 2002
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            Our Archdiocese of Milwaukee also discouraged us from having the Seder
            during Holy Week. However, they did encourage the dialog with the Jewish
            faith (we had a Jewish rabbi come during Lent and talk to us about the
            Seder)--we then had a Seder dinner two weeks before Holy Week.

            The seder was well-received by all--we had over 100 in attendance--our 9th
            graders read the parts.

            Karin
            North Lake, WI


            -----Original Message-----
            From: Sheri Stritof [mailto:sheri@...]
            Sent: Friday, February 01, 2002 9:42 PM
            To: dre-talk@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: [dre-talk] Seder Meal discouraged


            I was planning on having a Seder Meal for our religious education kids and
            was referred to this paragraph on our Archdiocese's website. It really
            surprised me.... guess I have been out of the loop for awhile.

            Sheri
            Ocean Park, WA

            http://www.seattlearch.org/progserv/litguideeaster.htm
            Passover Seder. Parish liturgy planners should seriously evaluate the custom
            of celebrating the Jewish Seder meal within the context of Holy Week. We
            must recognize, as Christians, that the Eucharist is our holy ritual meal,
            and that we should refrain from appropriating the Jewish Passover Seder,
            which we cannot, in full conformity with our faith, celebrate without major
            and likely inadmissible adaptation. Healthy ecumenical relations require
            respect for the religious heritage of others and the integrity of their
            rituals. Roman Catholics, traditionally sensitive to any perceived abuse of
            their own sacred rites and symbols, should surely understand this. Likewise,
            we should not appropriate the Passover Seder and adapt it for our own
            purposes.





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