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[dogme] emotion, communication and learning

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  • Julian Bamford
    Hi everyone, Below I ve pasted something about how actors remember lines, and the address of the full report. The final goal of language learning isn t to
    Message 1 of 7 , Feb 1, 2006
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      Hi everyone,
      Below I've pasted something about how actors remember lines, and the
      address of the full report.

      The final goal of language learning isn't to remember and regurgitate
      exact lines (except when using a phrase book). But I think this is
      interesting for its indication of how memory works in general,
      particularly how memory is "heavily reliant on emotion." There is also
      this from the full report: "Students who studied material by imagining
      conveying its meaning to somebody else who needed the information
      showed higher retention than those who tried to memorize the material
      by rote."

      Undoubtedly, the reason I like these findings that learning is more
      effective in situations that have genuine emotion and chances to
      communicate is because, in Scott's words, they "chime with my own
      experience as a learner (and my orientation as a teacher)."

      Julian


      HOW ACTORS REMEMBER THEIR LINES

      PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE (abridged) - What gives actors their seemingly
      effortless
      memory capabilities? Could acting teach us something about memory and
      cognition, and could acting principles help those with memory problems?
      These are the questions that cognitive psychologist Helga Noice
      (Elmhurst College) and her husband, cognitive researcher, actor, and
      director Tony Noice (Indiana State University) have set out to answer in
      nearly two decades of psychological studies of actors. The Noices have
      not only described a learning principle that can be taught to non-actors
      but they have also tested acting-based interventions to counter
      cognitive decline in older people. They review their research in the
      February issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science.

      According to the researchers, the secret of actors' memories is, well,
      acting. An actor acquires lines readily by focusing not on the words of
      the script, but on those words' meaning � the moment-to-moment
      motivations of the character saying them � as well as on the physical
      and emotional dimensions of their performance. . . Good actors don't
      think about their lines, but feel their character's intention in
      reaction to what the other actors do, causing their lines to come
      spontaneously and naturally. The researchers quote the great British
      actor Michael Caine: "You must be able to stand there not thinking of
      that line. You take it off the other actor's face.". . .

      Some of the Noices' findings confirm those of other researchers on
      memory. Memory is heavily reliant on emotion, action, and perception. In
      their work with actors, the Noices' have found, for example, that memory
      is aided by physical movement. In one study, lines learned while making
      an appropriate motion � e.g., walking across a stage � were more readily
      remembered by actors later than were lines unaccompanied by action. The
      physical motion didn't need to be repeated at the time of recall.

      http://www.psychologicalscience.org/media/releases/2006/pr060125.cfm

      Above summary taken from "Undernews" January 28 edition. Undernews is
      Sam Smith's free alternative news digest delivered daily to your email
      inbox. To subscribe,
      prorev-subscribe@...


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jeff Bragg
      I d beg to differ, actually. Being a bit of an amateur thesp myself, I often find that the best way to remember my lines is to copy them out, according to
      Message 2 of 7 , Feb 3, 2006
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        I'd beg to differ, actually.

        Being a bit of an amateur thesp myself, I often find that the
        best way to remember my lines is to copy them out, according to
        scene, on to index cards. Sometimes the mere act of copying out
        the phrases serves to imprint them on to my brain, but usually I
        have to carry the cards around with me and refer to them at odd
        moments of the day, testing my abibity to recall them against a
        given prompt (the previous lines from the other actor).

        So, a victory for rote learning and behaviouralism?

        Jeff B.
        [Abu Dhabi]


        --- Julian Bamford <bamford@...> wrote:

        > Hi everyone,
        > Below I've pasted something about how actors remember lines,
        > and the
        > address of the full report.
        >
        > The final goal of language learning isn't to remember and
        > regurgitate
        > exact lines (except when using a phrase book). But I think
        > this is
        > interesting for its indication of how memory works in general,
        > particularly how memory is "heavily reliant on emotion." There
        > is also
        > this from the full report: "Students who studied material by
        > imagining
        > conveying its meaning to somebody else who needed the
        > information
        > showed higher retention than those who tried to memorize the
        > material
        > by rote."
        >
        > Undoubtedly, the reason I like these findings that learning is
        > more
        > effective in situations that have genuine emotion and chances
        > to
        > communicate is because, in Scott's words, they "chime with my
        > own
        > experience as a learner (and my orientation as a teacher)."
        >
        > Julian
        >
        >
        > HOW ACTORS REMEMBER THEIR LINES
        >
        > PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE (abridged) - What gives actors their
        > seemingly
        > effortless
        > memory capabilities? Could acting teach us something about
        > memory and
        > cognition, and could acting principles help those with memory
        > problems?
        > These are the questions that cognitive psychologist Helga Noice
        > (Elmhurst College) and her husband, cognitive researcher,
        > actor, and
        > director Tony Noice (Indiana State University) have set out to
        > answer in
        > nearly two decades of psychological studies of actors. The
        > Noices have
        > not only described a learning principle that can be taught to
        > non-actors
        > but they have also tested acting-based interventions to counter
        > cognitive decline in older people. They review their research
        > in the
        > February issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science.
        >
        > According to the researchers, the secret of actors' memories
        > is, well,
        > acting. An actor acquires lines readily by focusing not on the
        > words of
        > the script, but on those words' meaning — the moment-to-moment
        > motivations of the character saying them — as well as on the
        > physical
        > and emotional dimensions of their performance. . . Good actors
        > don't
        > think about their lines, but feel their character's intention
        > in
        > reaction to what the other actors do, causing their lines to
        > come
        > spontaneously and naturally. The researchers quote the great
        > British
        > actor Michael Caine: "You must be able to stand there not
        > thinking of
        > that line. You take it off the other actor's face.". . .
        >
        > Some of the Noices' findings confirm those of other researchers
        > on
        > memory. Memory is heavily reliant on emotion, action, and
        > perception. In
        > their work with actors, the Noices' have found, for example,
        > that memory
        > is aided by physical movement. In one study, lines learned
        > while making
        > an appropriate motion — e.g., walking across a stage — were
        > more readily
        > remembered by actors later than were lines unaccompanied by
        > action. The
        > physical motion didn't need to be repeated at the time of
        > recall.
        >
        >
        http://www.psychologicalscience.org/media/releases/2006/pr060125.cfm
        >
        > Above summary taken from "Undernews" January 28 edition.
        > Undernews is
        > Sam Smith's free alternative news digest delivered daily to
        > your email
        > inbox. To subscribe,
        > prorev-subscribe@...
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >
        > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
        > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        > dogme-unsubscribe@...
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


        jeff
        abu dhabi



        ___________________________________________________________
        NEW Yahoo! Cars - sell your car and browse thousands of new and used cars online! http://uk.cars.yahoo.com/
      • Marianne Dorléac
        Merci Julian ! I fully agree with you ! Sometimes the students ask me to give them a sort of lecture about a particular point of French grammar. Well, I give
        Message 3 of 7 , Feb 3, 2006
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          Merci Julian !
          I fully agree with you !
          Sometimes the students ask me to give them a sort of "lecture" about a particular point of French grammar. Well, I give them a sumary on a A4 sheet of paper. Then I ask them to read it carefully for 5 or 10 minutes (according to the grammar point, or I can even omit to give them any time limit) and to explain it to the person sitting next to them : any means is allowed (they can draw, act, mime, talk, sing) but they must not read their paper of course : well, most of them decide to act the grammar explanation out !

          Marianne

          Julian Bamford <bamford@...> a écrit :
          Hi everyone,
          Below I've pasted something about how actors remember lines, and the
          address of the full report.

          The final goal of language learning isn't to remember and regurgitate
          exact lines (except when using a phrase book). But I think this is
          interesting for its indication of how memory works in general,
          particularly how memory is "heavily reliant on emotion." There is also
          this from the full report: "Students who studied material by imagining
          conveying its meaning to somebody else who needed the information
          showed higher retention than those who tried to memorize the material
          by rote."

          Undoubtedly, the reason I like these findings that learning is more
          effective in situations that have genuine emotion and chances to
          communicate is because, in Scott's words, they "chime with my own
          experience as a learner (and my orientation as a teacher)."

          Julian


          HOW ACTORS REMEMBER THEIR LINES

          PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE (abridged) - What gives actors their seemingly
          effortless
          memory capabilities? Could acting teach us something about memory and
          cognition, and could acting principles help those with memory problems?
          These are the questions that cognitive psychologist Helga Noice
          (Elmhurst College) and her husband, cognitive researcher, actor, and
          director Tony Noice (Indiana State University) have set out to answer in
          nearly two decades of psychological studies of actors. The Noices have
          not only described a learning principle that can be taught to non-actors
          but they have also tested acting-based interventions to counter
          cognitive decline in older people. They review their research in the
          February issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science.

          According to the researchers, the secret of actors' memories is, well,
          acting. An actor acquires lines readily by focusing not on the words of
          the script, but on those words' meaning — the moment-to-moment
          motivations of the character saying them — as well as on the physical
          and emotional dimensions of their performance. . . Good actors don't
          think about their lines, but feel their character's intention in
          reaction to what the other actors do, causing their lines to come
          spontaneously and naturally. The researchers quote the great British
          actor Michael Caine: "You must be able to stand there not thinking of
          that line. You take it off the other actor's face.". . .

          Some of the Noices' findings confirm those of other researchers on
          memory. Memory is heavily reliant on emotion, action, and perception. In
          their work with actors, the Noices' have found, for example, that memory
          is aided by physical movement. In one study, lines learned while making
          an appropriate motion — e.g., walking across a stage — were more readily
          remembered by actors later than were lines unaccompanied by action. The
          physical motion didn't need to be repeated at the time of recall.

          http://www.psychologicalscience.org/media/releases/2006/pr060125.cfm

          Above summary taken from "Undernews" January 28 edition. Undernews is
          Sam Smith's free alternative news digest delivered daily to your email
          inbox. To subscribe,
          prorev-subscribe@...


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



          To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
          To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: dogme-unsubscribe@...
          Yahoo! Groups Links









          ---------------------------------
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          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Fiona
          Different folks, different strokes..... Singing is another word learning activity in this category. But it s one thing to learn the lyrics to a song and sing
          Message 4 of 7 , Feb 4, 2006
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            Different folks, different strokes.....

            Singing is another 'word learning' activity in this category. But
            it's one thing to learn the lyrics to a song and sing along in the
            car/shower, and quite another to stand in front of an audience and
            remember the words. That's where the emotional thing comes in -
            remember the lyrics as if they were a story, images, feelings etc
            etc. Rather like rehearsing what you're going to say in a foreign
            language when you're in the car/shower, and then face to face... your
            tongue seems two sizes too big and all those genders go out the
            window.

            How do YOU learn the words to the songs in your head? I'm curious..


            Fiona


            --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, Jeff Bragg <jeff_bragg2001@...> wrote:
            >
            > I'd beg to differ, actually.
            >
            > Being a bit of an amateur thesp myself, I often find that the
            > best way to remember my lines is to copy them out, according to
            > scene, on to index cards. Sometimes the mere act of copying out
            > the phrases serves to imprint them on to my brain, but usually I
            > have to carry the cards around with me and refer to them at odd
            > moments of the day, testing my abibity to recall them against a
            > given prompt (the previous lines from the other actor).
            >
            > So, a victory for rote learning and behaviouralism?
            >
            > Jeff B.
            > [Abu Dhabi]
            >
            >
            > --- Julian Bamford <bamford@...> wrote:
            >
            > > Hi everyone,
            > > Below I've pasted something about how actors remember lines,
            > > and the
            > > address of the full report.
            > >
            > > The final goal of language learning isn't to remember and
            > > regurgitate
            > > exact lines (except when using a phrase book). But I think
            > > this is
            > > interesting for its indication of how memory works in general,
            > > particularly how memory is "heavily reliant on emotion." There
            > > is also
            > > this from the full report: "Students who studied material by
            > > imagining
            > > conveying its meaning to somebody else who needed the
            > > information
            > > showed higher retention than those who tried to memorize the
            > > material
            > > by rote."
            > >
            > > Undoubtedly, the reason I like these findings that learning is
            > > more
            > > effective in situations that have genuine emotion and chances
            > > to
            > > communicate is because, in Scott's words, they "chime with my
            > > own
            > > experience as a learner (and my orientation as a teacher)."
            > >
            > > Julian
            > >
            > >
            > > HOW ACTORS REMEMBER THEIR LINES
            > >
            > > PSYCHOLOGICAL SCIENCE (abridged) - What gives actors their
            > > seemingly
            > > effortless
            > > memory capabilities? Could acting teach us something about
            > > memory and
            > > cognition, and could acting principles help those with memory
            > > problems?
            > > These are the questions that cognitive psychologist Helga Noice
            > > (Elmhurst College) and her husband, cognitive researcher,
            > > actor, and
            > > director Tony Noice (Indiana State University) have set out to
            > > answer in
            > > nearly two decades of psychological studies of actors. The
            > > Noices have
            > > not only described a learning principle that can be taught to
            > > non-actors
            > > but they have also tested acting-based interventions to counter
            > > cognitive decline in older people. They review their research
            > > in the
            > > February issue of Current Directions in Psychological Science.
            > >
            > > According to the researchers, the secret of actors' memories
            > > is, well,
            > > acting. An actor acquires lines readily by focusing not on the
            > > words of
            > > the script, but on those words' meaning — the moment-to-moment
            > > motivations of the character saying them — as well as on the
            > > physical
            > > and emotional dimensions of their performance. . . Good actors
            > > don't
            > > think about their lines, but feel their character's intention
            > > in
            > > reaction to what the other actors do, causing their lines to
            > > come
            > > spontaneously and naturally. The researchers quote the great
            > > British
            > > actor Michael Caine: "You must be able to stand there not
            > > thinking of
            > > that line. You take it off the other actor's face.". . .
            > >
            > > Some of the Noices' findings confirm those of other researchers
            > > on
            > > memory. Memory is heavily reliant on emotion, action, and
            > > perception. In
            > > their work with actors, the Noices' have found, for example,
            > > that memory
            > > is aided by physical movement. In one study, lines learned
            > > while making
            > > an appropriate motion — e.g., walking across a stage — were
            > > more readily
            > > remembered by actors later than were lines unaccompanied by
            > > action. The
            > > physical motion didn't need to be repeated at the time of
            > > recall.
            > >
            > >
            > http://www.psychologicalscience.org/media/releases/2006/pr060125.cfm
            > >
            > > Above summary taken from "Undernews" January 28 edition.
            > > Undernews is
            > > Sam Smith's free alternative news digest delivered daily to
            > > your email
            > > inbox. To subscribe,
            > > prorev-subscribe@...
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
            > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
            > > dogme-unsubscribe@...
            > > Yahoo! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            > jeff
            > abu dhabi
            >
            >
            >
            > ___________________________________________________________
            > NEW Yahoo! Cars - sell your car and browse thousands of new and
            used cars online! http://uk.cars.yahoo.com/
            >
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