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Re: [dogme] DIGITALTHINK SERVES E-LEARNING TO MCDONALD'S

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  • Eric Baber
    Hi Tom and all, ... hidden in it somewhere for us. If McDonald s are making use of e-learning... Absolutely all large companies are now making use of
    Message 1 of 8 , Sep 3 4:10 AM
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      Hi Tom and all,

      > This caught my eye. I think there is a (maybe not very serious) message
      hidden in it somewhere for us. If McDonald's are making use of e-learning...

      Absolutely all large companies are now making use of e-learning - McDonald's
      must be one of the very last ones to do so.

      Best regards

      Eric


      Eric Baber
      London, England
      http://www.ericbaber.com
    • Tom Walton
      Hi everyone. This caught my eye. I think there is a (maybe not very serious) message hidden in it somewhere for us. If McDonald s are making use of
      Message 2 of 8 , Sep 3 4:14 AM
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        Hi everyone.

        This caught my eye. I think there is a (maybe not very serious) message hidden in it somewhere for us. If McDonald's are making use of e-learning...

        DigitalThink will assist McDonald's in launching an e-learning pilot to
        complement McDonald's worldwide training, learning, and development
        curriculum. The initiative, designed for restaurant employees in several
        countries, will be delivered initially in five languages. "We view our
        e-learning strategy as critical to our restaurants around the world," says
        Pat Crull, vice president of worldwide training, learning, and development.
        "We'll use time-tested and proven content from our curriculum and
        DigitalThink's instructional, creative, and technological expertise to
        build, host, and deliver our new e-learning initiative."

        ... oh, never mind.

        Tom Walton
        Barcelona, Spain



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Tom Walton
        Yeah, right. According to the same source (learningcircuits.org), by 2003 40% of the total spending on corporate training in the US will be on e-learning. But
        Message 3 of 8 , Sep 3 4:55 AM
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          Yeah, right. According to the same source (learningcircuits.org), by 2003
          40% of the total spending on corporate training in the US will be on
          e-learning. But given the number of times McDonalds has been mentioned in
          this group (McNuggets, etc)...

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Eric Baber <Eric@...>
          To: <dogme@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, September 03, 2001 1:10 PM
          Subject: Re: [dogme] DIGITALTHINK SERVES E-LEARNING TO MCDONALD'S


          > Hi Tom and all,
          >
          > > This caught my eye. I think there is a (maybe not very serious) message
          > hidden in it somewhere for us. If McDonald's are making use of
          e-learning...
          >
          > Absolutely all large companies are now making use of e-learning -
          McDonald's
          > must be one of the very last ones to do so.
          >
          > Best regards
          >
          > Eric
          >
          >
          > Eric Baber
          > London, England
          > http://www.ericbaber.com
          >
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: dogme-unsubscribe@...
          >
          > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          >
          >
          >
        • David French
          I remember when Scott and Jeremy informed us that Bjork would be appearing in a von Trier film and expressed concerns about the consequences for Dogme (or at
          Message 4 of 8 , Sep 4 7:01 AM
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            I remember when Scott and Jeremy informed us that
            Bjork would be appearing in a von Trier film and
            expressed concerns about the consequences for Dogme
            (or at least Scott did)

            Now look at this.

            "Bjork has now put behind her the ordeal of her
            appearance in Lars von Trier's film, Dancer In The
            Dark. For the first time in her life she found herself
            being moulded by an utterly ruthless Pygmalion."
            Guardian Weekly August 30 - September 5 2001

            Is it time to reassess von Trier's place in Dogme?


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          • David French
            I leafed through Teacher again the other day and was struck again by the genius of Sylvia Ashton-Warner. Here s a passage I thought might be relevant here.
            Message 5 of 8 , Sep 4 7:08 AM
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              I leafed through "Teacher" again the other day and was
              struck again by the genius of Sylvia Ashton-Warner.
              Here's a passage I thought might be relevant here.
              DF

              WORKBOOK
              Teachers say they need their workbooks.
              They say, I can't rely on myself in the melee of a
              lesson to work out the sequences on the spot. When the
              time comes I need everything at my fingertips. I've
              got to have it all thought out beforehand.
              Conception in tranquillity can range form the
              conscious condensation of material and method up to
              the level of prayer. All the great teachers of the
              past have drawn their action from non-action. From
              Christ upon the high mountain, through Lo Tung over
              his tea, down to us. And I can never see that these
              names are too big to be used side by side with today.
              The intention is the same - teaching. It's not this
              conception in tranquillity that is the point of
              departure.
              I know that the preparation of a workbook may clarify
              to a teacher what he is thinking about. I know that
              the order and method of it reflect inescapably upon
              the minds of the children. And I suspect from what I
              see that the very fact of a workbook evokes on the
              mind of a teacher a reliable peace. And this its notes
              mean that necessary stepping-stone between his
              conception and its execution. I indeed, I can believe
              comfortably enough that the assessment of a workbook
              can be truthfully close to the assessment of a man. It
              is neither the fact of a workbook nor its phase in
              teaching that is the point of departure. It's the
              incorrigible variety in man himself.
              For some teacher just don't see a workbook in this
              way. True, they see it in the same place between
              conception and execution, but not as a stepping-stone.
              To some teachers the workbook is the middleman
              intercepting some of the energy and glamour directed
              upon the canvas. Leonardo da Vinci cut straight into
              his marble, Rabindranath Tagore wrote his verses neat,
              and I didn't hear of Jesus making notes. Teacher, all
              of them in one medium or another, who mistrusted the
              middleman.
              To the extent that a teacher is an artist, and
              according to Plato there should be no distinction, his
              inner eye has the native power, unatrophied, to hold
              the work he means to do. And in the places where he
              can't see, he has a trust in himself that he will see
              it, either in time for the occasion or eventually,.
              And he would rather risk a blank in his teaching than
              expend cash on the middleman . He wants the feel of
              the glamour of direct engagement. He wants to see in
              his mind, as he teaches, the idea itself, rather than
              the page it is written on. He wants to work from
              conception itself directly upon the children without
              interference from the image of its record on a book.
              He wants to work in a way that to him is clear,
              without conflict and without interception.

              Sylvia Ashton-Warner (1963) Teacher Penguin p.72


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            • Luke Meddings
              ... About time too Luke
              Message 6 of 8 , Sep 4 9:05 AM
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                >"Bjork has now put behind her the ordeal of her
                >appearance in Lars von Trier's film, Dancer In The
                >Dark. For the first time in her life she found herself
                >being moulded by an utterly ruthless Pygmalion."

                About time too

                Luke
              • Diarmuid Fogarty
                I hate to come up with a suggestion that may be so obvious, but just in case it s not, may I point fans of Silvia Ashton Warner in the direction of John Holt.
                Message 7 of 8 , Sep 4 10:15 AM
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                  I hate to come up with a suggestion that may be so obvious, but just in case
                  it's not, may I point fans of Silvia Ashton Warner in the direction of John
                  Holt. His books 'How Children Fail' and 'How Children Learn' may well be of
                  great interest to fellow dogmetists.

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "David French" <prawdziwyanglik@...>
                  To: <dogme@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, September 04, 2001 3:08 PM
                  Subject: [dogme] Sylvia Ashton-Warner: workbook


                  > I leafed through "Teacher" again the other day and was
                  > struck again by the genius of Sylvia Ashton-Warner.
                  > Here's a passage I thought might be relevant here.
                  > DF
                  >
                  > WORKBOOK
                  > Teachers say they need their workbooks.
                  > They say, I can't rely on myself in the melee of a
                  > lesson to work out the sequences on the spot. When the
                  > time comes I need everything at my fingertips. I've
                  > got to have it all thought out beforehand.
                  > Conception in tranquillity can range form the
                  > conscious condensation of material and method up to
                  > the level of prayer. All the great teachers of the
                  > past have drawn their action from non-action. From
                  > Christ upon the high mountain, through Lo Tung over
                  > his tea, down to us. And I can never see that these
                  > names are too big to be used side by side with today.
                  > The intention is the same - teaching. It's not this
                  > conception in tranquillity that is the point of
                  > departure.
                  > I know that the preparation of a workbook may clarify
                  > to a teacher what he is thinking about. I know that
                  > the order and method of it reflect inescapably upon
                  > the minds of the children. And I suspect from what I
                  > see that the very fact of a workbook evokes on the
                  > mind of a teacher a reliable peace. And this its notes
                  > mean that necessary stepping-stone between his
                  > conception and its execution. I indeed, I can believe
                  > comfortably enough that the assessment of a workbook
                  > can be truthfully close to the assessment of a man. It
                  > is neither the fact of a workbook nor its phase in
                  > teaching that is the point of departure. It's the
                  > incorrigible variety in man himself.
                  > For some teacher just don't see a workbook in this
                  > way. True, they see it in the same place between
                  > conception and execution, but not as a stepping-stone.
                  > To some teachers the workbook is the middleman
                  > intercepting some of the energy and glamour directed
                  > upon the canvas. Leonardo da Vinci cut straight into
                  > his marble, Rabindranath Tagore wrote his verses neat,
                  > and I didn't hear of Jesus making notes. Teacher, all
                  > of them in one medium or another, who mistrusted the
                  > middleman.
                  > To the extent that a teacher is an artist, and
                  > according to Plato there should be no distinction, his
                  > inner eye has the native power, unatrophied, to hold
                  > the work he means to do. And in the places where he
                  > can't see, he has a trust in himself that he will see
                  > it, either in time for the occasion or eventually,.
                  > And he would rather risk a blank in his teaching than
                  > expend cash on the middleman . He wants the feel of
                  > the glamour of direct engagement. He wants to see in
                  > his mind, as he teaches, the idea itself, rather than
                  > the page it is written on. He wants to work from
                  > conception itself directly upon the children without
                  > interference from the image of its record on a book.
                  > He wants to work in a way that to him is clear,
                  > without conflict and without interception.
                  >
                  > Sylvia Ashton-Warner (1963) Teacher Penguin p.72
                  >
                  >
                  > __________________________________________________
                  > Do You Yahoo!?
                  > Get email alerts & NEW webcam video instant messaging with Yahoo!
                  Messenger
                  > http://im.yahoo.com
                  >
                  > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
                  > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: dogme-unsubscribe@...
                  >
                  > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • dnewson@uos.de
                  I confess I don t know Sylvia Ashton-Warner, but I do know a word to characterize the quotation just posted: precious. Personally, I always found it impossible
                  Message 8 of 8 , Sep 5 12:45 AM
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                    I confess I don't know Sylvia Ashton-Warner, but I do know
                    a word to characterize the quotation just posted:
                    precious. Personally, I always found it impossible to
                    use a workbook - I always wanted to do things my way.
                    But I can imagine that hard-pressed teachers with over-
                    large classes and too many hours to teach might find
                    them supportive.


                    Dennis

                    Dennis Newson (nominally retired)
                    formerly at the University of Osnabrueck
                    GERMANY
                    www.dennisnewson.de
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