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The value of metaphor

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  • Jeremy Harmer
    Dear all, I m venturing onto your turf after a loud discussion with Scott in a Dublin hotel bar on this issue (well, a group of drummers kept stomping through
    Message 1 of 2 , Apr 4, 2000
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      Dear all,

      I'm venturing onto your turf after a loud discussion with Scott in a Dublin
      hotel bar on this issue (well, a group of drummers kept stomping through the
      bar - honest - so it was quite difficult to hear and to be heard).

      I think the Dogme metaphor needs to be treated with considerably more
      caution (and more critically) than some of the stuff I've read seems to
      suggest. As an enthusiastic filmgoer I have some problems with what they're
      on about - even taking into account that the signed-up members have some
      difficulty keeping to their manifesto. But seriously, just imagine: with
      their strictures on artificial lighting we would never have had the airport
      scene at the end of Casablanca. With their 'no music' policy we would never
      have had the (admittedly over-the-top) score as El Aurens rode his camel
      through the desert. Yes, I enjoyed 'In the Company of Men' with its rigid
      camera and absolutely no music (apart from the scene changes), but (despite
      Scott's cycnicism) the music in American Beauty was also stunning, and The
      Insider - which I've just seen and admired - would have been impossible
      under Dogme conditions. And what about Ennio Morricone's music for various
      films etc etc.

      OK, I'm a coursebook writer and consumer (amongst other things). But I think
      there is something worrying about eschewing the benefits of books, tape
      recorders, videos, laboratories, and, Heavens, the Internet and all its
      wonders, in favour of a return to some pre-lapsarian paradise

      ..the land of lost content
      I see it shining plain
      the happy highways where we went
      and can not come again

      I absolutely admire teachers who can put together coherent, genuinely
      interactive and involving programmes without coursebooks (for example), but
      is that necessarily a great virtue - unless you're passionately committed to
      it? I think good teachers use all and anything they can to make classes
      interesting, involving and *real*. That's why I'm a huge fan of 'live
      listening' but also enjoy using taped material because of its variety and
      the fact that it's often interesting a/o funny.

      Right, I think I'll put on my helmet and flame-proof garments and hope you
      don't all blow me up too spectacularly!

      Jeremy
    • sthornbury@wanadoo.es
      I warned you we might expect some nutters on board! No seriously - it s great to hear a (mildly) dissenting voice - we were getting a bit inward looking. I am
      Message 2 of 2 , Apr 4, 2000
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        I warned you we might expect some nutters on board!
        No seriously - it's great to hear a (mildly) dissenting voice - we
        were getting a bit inward looking. I am preparing a summary of
        impressions from Dublin, plus new developments on the local front -
        and will also try and include a considered response to Jeremy. or
        later.
        Cheers, scott
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