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Re: [dogme] Activity Theory & gr*****

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  • djn@dennisnewson.de
    Perhaps I can smuggle in a comment on grammar here rather than giving a new subject and producing a groan of Oh No! around the dogme world... I m struck
    Message 1 of 38 , Oct 1, 2003
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      Perhaps I can smuggle in a comment on 'grammar' here rather than giving a new
      subject and producing a groan of "Oh No!" around the dogme world...

      I'm struck by how often even the illustrious on this list return to pointing out how X or Y
      can be used for work on relevant grammar. Grammar is the "Russian weed" of the
      TEFL (and even the dogme?) world.

      Let me rhetorically ask (i.e. without expecting or requiring an answer) - Why is it that
      'grammar' seems persisitently and ineradicably to be equated with 'language', 'syllabus',
      'What I hope my learners will learn' ?????

      How about, just to take one alternative example, the importance of correct register and
      intonation and use of suprasegmentals as a covered up syllabus to be outed so that the
      speaker can sound, and mean to sound:

      bored, cautiously interested, puzzled, dismissive, confident, delighted, excited, over
      the moon etc. (Not all at the same time, of course).

      'Vocabulary' ? Clearly.
      Useful chunks? Of course.
      The classic skills reading and writing? If needed - of course.

      But w h y this adherence to a shopping list of grammar points to be ticked off and
      the foregrounding of just one aspect of language?


      Bewildered of Osnabrueck
    • Diarmuid Fogarty
      Shaun writes: I´m organising a seminar for next month. I´ve called it Humanising Teaching so I am doing my bit to try and turn the heads of the people who
      Message 38 of 38 , Oct 19, 2003
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        Shaun writes: "I´m organising a seminar for next month. I´ve called it Humanising Teaching so I am doing my bit to try and turn the heads of the people who are bricks in the wall."

        Whilst I agree with the rest of what Shaun says, I think we need to beware of this prosetylising streak that we sometimes fall under the spell of. It does us all good to remember that we are *all* bricks in the wall to one extent or another. After all, what are we teaching and why does the need to learn it exist? If we give the impression that we know something that others don't, then we'll turn as many heads away (see Guardian list). To extend the metaphor, nobody is all brick. Everyone has some dogme moments in their teaching. All we are is a bunch of teachers who have decided to investigate why it is that those moments seem to work better than others. And before we get too excited about it, it doesn't look like we've agreed on any one final answer!

        Diarmuid

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