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RE: [dogme] coursebooks (again)

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  • Olwyn Alexander
    ... From: Neil Forrest - IH Barcelona [mailto:nforrest@bcn.ihes.com] Subject: RE: [dogme] coursebooks (again) ... these people associate with classrooms. One
    Message 1 of 20 , Dec 2, 2000
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      -----Original Message-----
      From: Neil Forrest - IH Barcelona [mailto:nforrest@...]
      Subject: RE: [dogme] coursebooks (again)

      >there are other things that
      these people associate with classrooms. One of these might be the
      prepackaging of lang "suitable" for my level - thus proving a way of
      encountering comprehensible input etc. <

      It seems to me that the main bad thing about coursebooks is that they
      encourage students (and teachers) to think that they contain all the
      language that needs to be taught.

      However, there are a number of good things about them:
      1) they save us all reinventing the wheel
      2) they're great for 'bad hair' days when we're not feeling creative
      3) they can give structure and purpose to TENOR (teaching English for no
      obvious reason) classes
      4) they can give students a bound record of what has been covered in class

      So how about:

      A student (and a teacher) needs a coursebook like a trapeze artist needs a
      safety net.

      Olwyn
    • Olwyn Alexander
      This started out as a warmer for an academic writing class and ended up taking the whole hour. I was working on writing abstracts with a group of MSc and PhD
      Message 2 of 20 , Dec 2, 2000
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        This started out as a warmer for an academic writing class and ended up
        taking the whole hour.

        I was working on writing abstracts with a group of MSc and PhD students in
        the computing and electrical engineering department and I wanted to look at
        compound noun phrases, e.g. wireless application protocol, virtual reality
        monitor control button, and how these are structured. They all wrote one
        they knew from their own research and we tried to work out some rules for
        the order of the elements (without too much success it has to be said - does
        anyone know of any research in this area?)

        After this I asked them to think of a piece of software or piece of
        equipment that needed inventing and give it a name. We had a lot of fun
        generating some extremely long complicated noun phrases and then deciding
        whether the order of the elements within them was OK, e.g. 'the java script
        virtual reality face to face communication system protocol'

        I think this might also work with names for processes but I haven't tried it
        out.

        Olwyn
      • sthornbury@wanadoo.es
        Ok, Olwyn and Neil, so coursebooks help non-autonomous learners organise the input for learning. Granted. But then, what kind of coursebook would a Dogme
        Message 3 of 20 , Dec 3, 2000
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          Ok, Olwyn and Neil, so coursebooks help non-autonomous
          learners organise the input for learning. Granted. But then, what
          kind of coursebook would a Dogme coursebook be? I mean a
          coursebook that foregrounds the learners' meanings, needs,
          desires - their "inner story"? How would it be organised? Topics?
          Tasks? Lexis? Strategies? And if organisation implies pre-
          selection, how does this square with the notion of language as
          being an emergent - and often idiosyncratic - phenomenon? And
          how does the idea of a book itself - inherently linear - square with
          the inherent complexity, and non-incremental nature - of language
          learning?

          I ask these questions on the eve of a meeting with a publisher who
          has been trying to involve me, against my will, in a coursebook
          project. What price Dogme Beginners, Dogme Pre-Int, Dogme
          Intermediate? Any takers???
        • Olwyn Alexander
          From: sthornbury@wanadoo.es Sent: 03 December 2000 16:22 ... coursebook that foregrounds the learners meanings, needs, desires - their inner story ? How
          Message 4 of 20 , Dec 3, 2000
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            From: sthornbury@...
            Sent: 03 December 2000 16:22

            >what kind of coursebook would a Dogme coursebook be? I mean a
            coursebook that foregrounds the learners' meanings, needs,
            desires - their "inner story"? How would it be organised?<

            In fact I believe there already is a dogme coursebook of a kind. It's called
            'Writing for Study Purposes' and is by Arthur Brookes and Peter Grundy (CUP
            1990) It suggests moving from a teacher dominated classroom to one where the
            teacher is an equal member of the group. It's laid out like a teacher
            resource book but a lot of the suggestions for lessons require the students
            to tell the 'inner story' of their research writing by bringing material to
            the classroom themselves.

            >And if organisation implies pre-selection, how does this square with
            the notion of language as being an emergent - and often idiosyncratic -
            phenomenon?<

            Even in a dogme lesson the teacher surely has some idea of what might be
            discussed, for example, Scott, in the workshop you did at the TESOL Scotland
            conference in November you wrote six sentences for discussion which were all
            about the future - that's selection, isn't it?

            >What price Dogme Beginners, Dogme Pre-Int, Dogme
            Intermediate? <

            Even the Dogme 95 maxims (or minims, I rather like David's coinage)
            recognise that direction is required; it's just not allowed to be credited
            out of proportion with what's happening in the rest of the film. In the same
            way, I think the teacher has a responsibility for helping the class to get
            started and then stepping back as far as the students want and letting them
            get on with things. So Dogme Beginners, Pre-Int, Intermediate (I agree that
            you don't really need to go beyond this level) might just be starter
            activities that these levels could cope with - possibly with a reference
            section to support whatever might have come up.

            Olwyn
          • Luke Meddings
            ... I can t imagine a dogme coursebook having levels at all. ... It may be that there are or will be books which fit the dogme classroom, but I doubt that
            Message 5 of 20 , Dec 7, 2000
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              >Even the Dogme 95 maxims (or minims, I rather like David's coinage)
              >recognise that direction is required; it's just not allowed to be credited
              >out of proportion with what's happening in the rest of the film. In the same
              >way, I think the teacher has a responsibility for helping the class to get
              >started and then stepping back as far as the students want and letting them
              >get on with things. So Dogme Beginners, Pre-Int, Intermediate (I agree that
              >you don't really need to go beyond this level) might just be starter
              >activities that these levels could cope with - possibly with a reference
              >section to support whatever might have come up.

              I can't imagine a dogme 'coursebook' having levels at all.

              >In fact I believe there already is a dogme coursebook of a kind. It's called
              >'Writing for Study Purposes' and is by Arthur Brookes and Peter Grundy (CUP
              >1990) It suggests moving from a teacher dominated classroom to one where the
              >teacher is an equal member of the group. It's laid out like a teacher
              >resource book but a lot of the suggestions for lessons require the students
              >to tell the 'inner story' of their research writing by bringing material to
              >the classroom themselves.

              It may be that there are or will be books which fit the dogme classroom, but I doubt that 'coursebooks' as we know and ahem love them are among them. (I'm haunted by this idea that many teachers get bored stupid by using the coursebooks themselves but don't see another way of doing things ... and don't dare trying a lesson without them unless the photocopier breaks down etc. I mean, what happened when the lights went out in New York in the '60's? In the words of the old Northern Soul song, 'New York in the dark / The city with a great big spark / Although they couldn't see / They were happy as can be / In the dark, in the dark / Yeah yeah yeah yeah')

              >>And if organisation implies pre-selection, how does this square with
              >the notion of language as being an emergent - and often idiosyncratic -
              >phenomenon?<
              >
              >Even in a dogme lesson the teacher surely has some idea of what might be
              >discussed, for example, Scott, in the workshop you did at the TESOL Scotland
              >conference in November you wrote six sentences for discussion which were all
              >about the future - that's selection, isn't it?

              Having done some seminars/workshops, on my own and with Scott, I'd say it's a different context - or maybe a different (stage of) experience. I firmly believe that in the dogme classroom the teacher can go in without any idea of what might be discussed. Because s/he will have a good idea of what to do with the language issues that emerge. It may well be a question of experience - I wouldn't currently dare do a seminar without any planning at all - but also of context. With a class you revisit the people and the language they produce. With a seminar, you generally don't get the chance to revisit.

              Luke
            • profshaun36
              Hi all I´ve finally plucked up the courage to speak out and start to air my views and boy do I feel good. I am one of those teachers who has always given the
              Message 6 of 20 , Apr 8 5:19 PM
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                Hi all
                I´ve finally plucked up the courage to speak out and start to air my
                views and boy do I feel good.

                I am one of those teachers who has always given the ideal lesson for
                the observing schools coordinator when they visit but, as Ol´ blue
                eye´s once said, DID IT MY WAY when they weren´t there. Sorry for the
                corny start.
                In my school or should I say institution, I am stuck with books, pre-
                prepared lesson plans, pre-prepared video activities and pre-prepared
                handouts, all within easy access and readily at my disposal. Oh and
                pre prepared power point activities. Can there be anything worse? It
                sounds like a frozen food version on ELT.
                It is amazing to see students walk out of class having not touched
                their books and realising how much better the class was.

                I also have the luxury of being a private teacher and being able to
                negotiate and sometimes dictate what is done in the classroom.
                Without relying on materials is not only is this more challenging it
                is easier to plan and much cheaper on your pocket.

                I saw Scott and Luke present at International House London conference
                over 2 years ago while doing my DELTA and came away having seen some
                course book writers feathers ruffled. It was funny and eye opening. I
                thought many people thought the same way as them but were just to
                scared to say.

                So to get started here are my favourite lines in my no materials
                classes

                So, What do you want to do today?
                What a shame you brought your books you won´t need them
                To Teens. Don´t show your parents you books or they will complain
                about having to pay out so much.
                Who told you to get your books out?
                Gustavo, you forgot your book today. Congratulations you won´t need
                it anyway.

                I´m sure I don´t have to tell people in this group the benefits not
                only for the students, but for the teacher that not using the
                materials can bring.

                Be gentle
                Shaun

                I feel by working this way it gives me a better insite into my
                students, builds up trust much more and makes me want to put new
                ideas into practice (and the students like experimenting too).

                Be gentle with me
                Shaun
              • lifang67
                Dear Shaun: I think everybody was frightened off by your (somewhat suggestive!) be gentle . But I have a rather brusque (but characteristically long-winded)
                Message 7 of 20 , Apr 10 4:41 PM
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                  Dear Shaun:

                  I think everybody was frightened off by your (somewhat
                  suggestive!) "be gentle". But I have a rather brusque (but
                  characteristically long-winded) question I'd like to ask YOU.

                  I'm sitting here with a big stack of homework from my students. As I
                  explained, they are not doing "lesson plans" per se, but they are
                  doing "maps"--empty maps, with lots of empty spaces for putting in
                  answers.

                  For example, Suk-in has decided to start her class with "How are
                  you". So she has drawn a big picture of a cactus. The spines near the
                  bottom are for the names of students who are feeling a bit ropey
                  today, while on the topmost branch there is a very pretty cactus
                  blossom with a happy bee buzzing on it marked "terrific".

                  Bong-ju, on the other hand, has not got the idea of focussing on
                  learner answers at all. She is still obsessed with getting her
                  teacher talk exactly right. Here's what she had two weeks ago:

                  T: Who is your favorite and honorble man (or woman)?
                  S: I think our paster is good man bause he loves the god and teach us
                  how to meet the god, Jesus.

                  Two pages of drek like that! Last week I asked her to figure out some
                  way to allow children to ask teacher's questions (and maybe even ask
                  each other questions? Yes? Possible, Bong-ju?).

                  Here's what Bong-ju has this week:

                  S: What do you think that if I will be the winner of the Lotto, what
                  do I do now?

                  Oy, vey. Bong-ju thinks she is a teacher's book developer, not a
                  teacher. She is not working with children, but with cloned teachers.

                  How can I get Bongju to stop ventriloquizing, think of real children
                  in real classrooms, and listen?

                  This problem probably seems completely unrelated to your letter, but
                  I think it's not. You see, Bong-ju, like many students here, does a
                  lot of "gwa-oe", that is, private tutoring. The result, I think, is
                  that she really only thinks of classroom interaction as two-sided,
                  non-reversible, T asks and S answers. She can't reverse the flow of
                  information, she can't think about cross-classroom interaction, she
                  can't think about lessons from the ANSWER end instead of the question
                  end simply because for her lessons are a fairly simple matter of
                  sitting down and asking lists of questions of one student.

                  You are a dogmetic teacher who works largely in a one-on-one setting.
                  How do you make the transition to a T-large class setting? How do you
                  go from teaching a class which has two bodies and two heads to a
                  forty-two bodies and forty-two heads.

                  Poor Bong-ju: she is convinced that the way to go is to treat the
                  latter situation as forty-two bodies and two heads. How do I show her
                  how wrong she is?

                  Go ahead--give me a little rough stuff...

                  dk1
                • Shaun Dowling
                  Hi dk1 Thanks for the advice about my message. I didn´t know what to put and how developed things are. It is all a bit strange going ito a user group but
                  Message 8 of 20 , Apr 10 6:01 PM
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                    Hi dk1

                    Thanks for the advice about my message. I didn´t know what to put and how developed things are. It is all a bit strange going ito a user group but talking about dogme teaching has been on my mind for so time.

                    Well let me try and give you some concrete and tangable responses to the teachers problems. These are all of the cuff so are not planned in any order. Tell me what you think?

                    About the groups.
                    Students are usually waiting for the normal tacher one liners such as.
                    Open your book at page...
                    What did we study last class?
                    Did you everyone do the homework? Let´s mark it.

                    By moving away from these boring one liners is what suprises students and make them sit open and smile.
                    Questions like

                    What did you have for breakfast this morning?
                    Believe me this sounds boring but it is not with constant questions making the students describe more and more about their breakfast. What did you have on the bread. The students find they need simple vocabulary which they never thought of before and they like it.

                    What do you think of ... (a current topic in the news)?

                    For the How do you feel? she would probably be better raising the students interest by saying
                    I´m nervous/happy today today.....(wait for a question from the student who is still awake....
                    SILENCE (Eye movement may be necessary to invite a response) then suddenly someone plucks up courge
                    Why? (they say)
                    come up with some excuse.
                    Then the teacher will say.How do you feel? (you´ve then given them some sort of model they can get to grips with before they speak. They aslo know you have feeling to.)
                    (if they say OK) they need provoking with more searching questions.
                    I didn´t mind the cactus idea though and just by drawing it on the board I´m sure the students will immediately know what they are about to say. They could come up and write a word about how they feel in the region of the cactus that suits their mood. It has possibilities. Depending on the level they could explain why they wrote this word.
                    I remember handing out cuisenaire rods and getting the learner to choose the colour and saying why they feel like the colour they have chosen.
                    Well back to the questions
                    Then the teacher should repeat these subject the next class or the following week. The students find that they can express themselves better can achieve something they couldn´t do before. There a good book by Jimmie Hill about how important repitition is and he also writes about it in Teaching Collocations by LTP (great book)

                    Then the students will come into class and expect the same questions and will tell you their eating habits, for example, even before you can ask them. Remember you are asking the learners normal simple questions and there will be a language gap somewhere that the teacher can fill with the relevant vocab.

                    Also you can´t hit the students with a question and always expect them to start speaking with you on a personal basis (and I stress a personal basis is the best way of getting them to speak) until you have built up a good rapport but attacking this subject could go on for ever.

                    Another piont is student interaction. Here is one idea for now
                    For the teacher who is more worried about her question, yes you are right she should be worried about the response. Perhaps this is where she is unsure. The best thing to do is to first throw that wonderful question at them and before they say anything pair the students up. Thye have time to practice and become more confortable with the topic. Then you listen, move around the room, before getting ready for what they will give you. While walking around the room the students will ask individual questions which the teacher can usually clear up. These will normally be the same questions that come up when the whole group comes together. Then students will correct, help each other. This gets the teacher off the hook so to speak and allows him/her to listen. Yes it is listening which is the most important thing here. If you don´t listen to them students won´t even think it´s worth talking about, and if you don´t listen you won´t be aware of where the language gap is.

                    Then as you listen you will have to give your opinion. I´m afraid the the teacher trainers would put me against a wall and shoot me but this is a simple thing that is necessary for provoking learners and seeing drawing them out. It can be difficult for some people but I you can even say a ridiculous opinion so they are not sure what you think and this invariably provokes them once more. If you think that things could get out of hand and the students are getting heated you should say that this is not really your opinion and this was just to promote speaking or ideas. I certainly have no problems with this in Brazil but this may be a problem in Asian cultures as well as depending on the characteristics and sensitivity of the teacher. But this is I hope some food for thought and may possibley help you or the other teacher develop your own way.
                    If a teacher does not want to give an opinion they must be ready with another question based on the discussion with the learners. It MUST develop what they are saying not go on to something completely different.

                    I think for a dogme class you must take risks but have something up your sleeve it what you tried didn´t work. Something to fall back on as you don´t know where the class could go. I find warmers which last one hour are really good. Be honest. Don´t you love them and don´t your students? The things that work then become the activity you have up your sleeve.

                    Language classes that are based on a Grammatical language focus means students will only speak sentences so teachers must be aware of the vocabulary they need. Also a more task based approach is better.

                    Well that´s all for now. I have an IELTS class tomorrow and must take 3 seconds to decide what I am going to do with the woman

                    Any more help on protocol please feel free to let me know.

                    Shaun





                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: lifang67
                    To: dogme@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Thursday, April 10, 2003 8:41 PM
                    Subject: [dogme] Re: New member


                    Dear Shaun:

                    I think everybody was frightened off by your (somewhat
                    suggestive!) "be gentle". But I have a rather brusque (but
                    characteristically long-winded) question I'd like to ask YOU.

                    I'm sitting here with a big stack of homework from my students. As I
                    explained, they are not doing "lesson plans" per se, but they are
                    doing "maps"--empty maps, with lots of empty spaces for putting in
                    answers.

                    For example, Suk-in has decided to start her class with "How are
                    you". So she has drawn a big picture of a cactus. The spines near the
                    bottom are for the names of students who are feeling a bit ropey
                    today, while on the topmost branch there is a very pretty cactus
                    blossom with a happy bee buzzing on it marked "terrific".

                    Bong-ju, on the other hand, has not got the idea of focussing on
                    learner answers at all. She is still obsessed with getting her
                    teacher talk exactly right. Here's what she had two weeks ago:

                    T: Who is your favorite and honorble man (or woman)?
                    S: I think our paster is good man bause he loves the god and teach us
                    how to meet the god, Jesus.

                    Two pages of drek like that! Last week I asked her to figure out some
                    way to allow children to ask teacher's questions (and maybe even ask
                    each other questions? Yes? Possible, Bong-ju?).

                    Here's what Bong-ju has this week:

                    S: What do you think that if I will be the winner of the Lotto, what
                    do I do now?

                    Oy, vey. Bong-ju thinks she is a teacher's book developer, not a
                    teacher. She is not working with children, but with cloned teachers.

                    How can I get Bongju to stop ventriloquizing, think of real children
                    in real classrooms, and listen?

                    This problem probably seems completely unrelated to your letter, but
                    I think it's not. You see, Bong-ju, like many students here, does a
                    lot of "gwa-oe", that is, private tutoring. The result, I think, is
                    that she really only thinks of classroom interaction as two-sided,
                    non-reversible, T asks and S answers. She can't reverse the flow of
                    information, she can't think about cross-classroom interaction, she
                    can't think about lessons from the ANSWER end instead of the question
                    end simply because for her lessons are a fairly simple matter of
                    sitting down and asking lists of questions of one student.

                    You are a dogmetic teacher who works largely in a one-on-one setting.
                    How do you make the transition to a T-large class setting? How do you
                    go from teaching a class which has two bodies and two heads to a
                    forty-two bodies and forty-two heads.

                    Poor Bong-ju: she is convinced that the way to go is to treat the
                    latter situation as forty-two bodies and two heads. How do I show her
                    how wrong she is?

                    Go ahead--give me a little rough stuff...

                    dk1



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                  • lifang67
                    Thanks for the rough stuff, Shaun... Yes, I m very big on breakfast myself, particularly those early Monday morning class when every gut is rumbling. Breakfast
                    Message 9 of 20 , Apr 12 12:14 AM
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                      Thanks for the rough stuff, Shaun...

                      Yes, I'm very big on breakfast myself, particularly those early
                      Monday morning class when every gut is rumbling.

                      Breakfast is a particularly good vocabulary source in Korea, because
                      Koreans don't eat anything in particular for breakfast--they eat more
                      or less the same thing they eat the other two meals of the day. (Once
                      a Korean teacher got up at a conference and asked why Westerners had
                      special food for breakfast but not really for lunch or dinner. Nobody
                      could answer.) This means that the vocabulary is quite a bit richer
                      than with Western breakfasts (particularly continental ones) and it's
                      generalizable too.

                      I once assigned this bit of a child's diary as input for a lesson
                      plan:

                      "I wash my face. I brush my teeth. I have my breakfast. In the
                      morning, I have so many things."

                      Nice, huh? Oh, not the grammar, that's just a substitution drill. But
                      the inductive logic structure: example, example, example,
                      generalization.

                      First we made a song out of it, using traditional Korean music. Then
                      we turned it into a questionnaire: "How long does it take... What do
                      you use to... Why....? Tell me more about...." Then a kind of
                      survey: "Does anybody else....?"

                      The homework was to take it home and rewrite the whole lesson as an
                      EVENING lesson. And we discovered almost immediately that evenings,
                      as a topic, are much richer and more varied and unpredictable--almost
                      impossible to "song-teach" or "questionnaire-teach".

                      Now get a load of this. The assignment is to come up with ONE lesson
                      topic that will yields at least ten questions whose answers can be
                      compared and shared.

                      1) Let's talk about your high school memories.
                      2) Does anyone else (sic) have high school memories?
                      3) Can anybody else have high school memories?
                      4) What do you have high school memories?
                      5) What does he have high school memories? Ask him.
                      6) What do I have high school memories? Ask me.

                      Clearly grammar isn't one of them. But the thing that really hurts my
                      sensitive artistic soul is not the grammar mistakes but the utterly
                      inhuman, mechanical nature of it; how thoughtlessly and blindly it is
                      put together: a lesson plan as a list of questions to be inflicted,
                      as relentless and unanswerable as the hammer blows of fate at the end
                      of Mahler's Ninth, yielding answers to be utterly ignored.

                      Yet the grammar is related to the insensitivity. This learner has a
                      mechanical rule for creating questions, and without any actual
                      feedback from the interlocutor, that rule just takes over. The rule
                      is wrong, but it could just as well have been right; it wouldn't have
                      made any difference to the quality or even the outcome of the
                      interaction in class.

                      My child wrote "I wash my face. I brush my teeth. I have my
                      breakfast. I have..." for the same reason. Because there is no one
                      there to answer, the child simply uses the last sentence as the
                      interactant and adds on to that. Mechanically. Because the child is
                      alone.

                      Just as (Western) dinners are more unpredictable than (Western)
                      breakfasts, sunsets are supposed to be less predictable and less
                      sociable than sunrises (or so the Eastern belief goes, perhaps
                      because the sun rises out of the sea here.)

                      When I was writing guidebook crap, I was sent out to watch the
                      sunrise from the top of a mountain in Fujian Province. Not wanting to
                      climb the mountain in the dark or spend the whole night up there (as
                      is traditional), I decided to watch the sunset instead.

                      The locals were horrified. Sunset watching wasn't done. Sunrises were
                      for watching. You went up in the dark or spent the night on the
                      mountain, and then watched the sunrise with hundreds of other people
                      and then you climbed down together and went about your business full
                      of optimism and hope. A sunset left you gloomy and pessimistic with
                      nowhere to go but bed. "But I LIKE going to bed. And I AM gloomy and
                      pessimistic," I protested.

                      "Don't do it," they insisted. "You'll be all alone." I was, too.

                      dk1
                    • sddowling
                      ... Two things you wrote the first in your recent message and in the last one. As I work in the capital of the country that took the World Cup away from Korea
                      Message 10 of 20 , Apr 12 4:21 AM
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                        > Hi dk1

                        Two things you wrote the first in your recent message and in
                        the last one.
                        As I work in the capital of the country that took the World
                        Cup away from Korea (and Japan) last year, we too are a place
                        with no street names, just numbers.
                        Secondly, I am a sunrise person too. Although I am miles away
                        from the sea we have one of the most beautiful skies in the
                        world here. All day it is great and inspiring but especially
                        in the morning and you can´t help realising how lucky you
                        are. Our sunset is great as the city was designed with the
                        sky in mind so when the sun goes down the shadows and images
                        that apear are just something to behold.

                        Back to teaching..
                        I liked the singing drill. I will tell the other teachers who
                        teach children at my school. I am in the middle of writing an
                        article and it is about routines. Grammar is out for me, it
                        just stunts their communication, and because in a latin
                        country students can translate words easily they choose more
                        formal language and it sounds strange.

                        I find that by collocating the empty/delexicalised verbs
                        get/go/make/have/do/take students can sound much more native
                        speaker. I don´t know if it is the same where you are as I´m
                        sure the L1 and L2 differences are certainly different/more
                        compicated than my teaching context here.

                        I show cards with expression like.. breakfast, a nap, the
                        dog for a walk, a shower, to work, the car to work, a coffee
                        etc
                        The students have to choose the delexicalised/empty verbs and
                        you find they produce much richer language instead of.. eat
                        breakfast go to work arrive at work, sleep a small amount.
                        etc. boring and so wierd.

                        I wouldn´t mind the guide book job
                        Shaun


                        ---
                        UOL, o melhor da Internet
                        http://www.uol.com.br/
                      • control902
                        Hello ,Friends I would like first to introduce my self. I am a teacher of English. I like to improve teaching Methods whch help students to get better in
                        Message 11 of 20 , May 26, 2010
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                          Hello ,Friends

                          I would like first to introduce my self. I am a teacher of English. I
                          like to improve teaching Methods whch help students to get better in
                          English.Because of that I made a blog which discuss How can we improve
                          teaching language. I hope you can visit my blog and write comments for
                          my posts .if you can also subscribe in my email subscribtion to see up
                          to date articles I write. This will make me Happy [:)] .

                          This is MY Blog
                          <http://learningstep.wordpress.com/>



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                        • oliveroil60
                          I am a teacher of English as a foreign language . I am also blogger . I made ablog .feel free to visit my blog and leave comment .This is my blog site
                          Message 12 of 20 , Oct 12, 2010
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                            I am a teacher of English as a foreign language . I am also blogger .
                            I made ablog .feel free to visit my blog and leave comment .This is my blog site
                            http://madrasaty.wordpress.com/
                            All your comments will be recieved gratefully.
                            Best wishes
                            Mr.Saeed
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