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Re: Dogme and reading comprehension

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  • masee
    Hi Bruno, Leona and Mark Thanks for sharing your ideas, I m managing to have an experimental course of Dogme on reading comprehension in a few months, will let
    Message 1 of 13 , Dec 10, 2012
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      Hi Bruno, Leona and Mark
      Thanks for sharing your ideas, I'm managing to have an experimental course of Dogme on reading comprehension in a few months, will let u know about the results and experience.
      Best
      Masi

      --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, mcjsa@... wrote:
      >
      > Hi Bruno,
      >
      > Thanks for these interesting ideas on reading. This seems to be casting
      > "real" reading as instrumental reading where the need is conjured up by
      > an imagined need. I like the "novel/story" thing. It may be interesting
      > to cast this as self-narrative that students construct in various media:
      > print, audio, film, image, mobilizing a broader view of literacy than
      > the traditionally receptive, print focused one.
      >
      > A student self-narrative could be individually or group focused and
      > might help students to re-negotiate personal and shared identities in
      > English. This would integrate their reading and writing and give them a
      > real reason to read. It would be interesting to see the types of things
      > they choose to read, and since this reading would likely be directed
      > giving them the tools and inspiration they need to create their own
      > personal narrative, they would be motivated by a genuine need.
      >
      > Recently, I've been moving more toward self-directed reading in my
      > classes. It takes many weeks for students to understand what this is
      > about, and why they should do it, so, to pull it off you need to have a
      > long time with them. I realized that when I selected readings, no matter
      > how careful I was, or how well I knew the students, what I chose would
      > not interest more than 5% of any group, and when students are not
      > interested in a text, their reading is distant, perfunctory, and
      > disengaged. When this is the case, I cannot justify asking them to read
      > anything at all. Reading is not something that you do for a class, or
      > because someone told you to do it. Reading is part of who you are. And
      > while people are building new identities in a new language, we have an
      > opportunity to integrate reading into that identity.
      >
      > I think that the self-narrative would work with any level student. With
      > lower levels, the focus would probably be on audio and image, moving
      > gradually towards textual expression as students' language competency
      > grows. In many contexts, reading and writing are the most accessible
      > forms of engagement with a language and it is engagement that builds
      > competency.
      >
      > Mark
      >
      >
      > On Tue, Oct 23, 2012, at 09:46 AM, Bruno LEYS wrote:
      > > Dear Leona, Masi and others
      > >
      > > I totally agree with how Leona's stresses the importance of a "real need
      > > to read". I quite like the movie descriptions activity. You could also
      > > deal with TV programmes (use a TV guide and decide what to watch
      > > tonight).
      > > Similar activities can be holiday/hotel brochures where students choose a
      > > programme of activities / or discuss which hotel they would choose
      > > (taking into account price, facilities, other traveller's reviews ...).
      > >
      > > I also quite like the 'Wall Papers' (reading a newspaper together)
      > > activity from "the book" (p. 55). I have tried it out several times
      > > myself and each time it turns out to be a great lesson.
      > >
      > > News stories with catchy headlines (like 'The boy who came out from the
      > > cold' in 'A Framework for Task-Based Learning' - Jane Willis) make the
      > > students formulate their own comprehension questions (This is what I'd
      > > like to find out in this article, text...
      > >
      > > It can also work with a novel/story. You start reading an exciting part,
      > > taken from in the middle of the story. The students discuss what might
      > > have preceded these events, formulate ideas on relationships between the
      > > characters, etc. Quite often they will want to read the whole story to
      > > see if they were right.
      > >
      > > Kind regards
      > > Bruno
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Bruno Leys •
      > > English and TEFL
      > > KHBO - teacher training department Bruges, Belgium
      > > http://blog.associatie.kuleuven.be/brunoleys/
      > > @BrunoLeys
      > > Tel. +32 50 30 51 00 / 059 56 90 00 • mobile phone: +32 (0)477/856706
      > > bruno.leys@...<mailto:voornaam.naam@...> talent@work
      > > ________________________________
      > >
      > > Katholieke Hogeschool Brugge - Oostende
      > > Campus Xaverianenstraat 10 • B-8200 Campus Brugge • http://www.khbo.be/
      > > ________________________________
      > > Van: dogme@yahoogroups.com [dogme@yahoogroups.com] namens leonitanz
      > > [leonitanz@...]
      > > Verzonden: maandag 22 oktober 2012 22:27
      > > Aan: dogme@yahoogroups.com
      > > Onderwerp: [dogme] Re: Dogme and reading comprehension
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Masi,
      > >
      > > I am also interested in how the Dogme approach looks in a classroom. Have
      > > you had anyone contributing ideas for your thesis? For me, teaching
      > > reading goes hand and hand with writing, we have a shared experience,
      > > write about it, then read and share stories that we all have prior
      > > knowledgeof the content, comprehension easily follows. Reading
      > > comprehension alone represents more of a challenge as the material is
      > > from an external source. So as a teacher I have to create a real need for
      > > the students to want to comprehend the information. For example, we are
      > > going to make something in the class, I give them written instructions to
      > > follow, we are going to watch a movie so I give them different movie
      > > descriptions so they can choose which one they want to watch, from our
      > > conversation we need to find information so we access the material to
      > > find answers. All reading in my class has a real purpose for everyone. So
      > > I would be interested in anyone else sharing some of their techniques for
      > > creating a "real need to read" in the classroom!
      > > Thanks
      > > Leona
      > >
      > > --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com<mailto:dogme%40yahoogroups.com>, "masee"
      > > <masee_86@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Hey everybody
      > > >
      > > > I wanna know more about Dogme kind of teaching reading comprehension in upper intermediate levels, you know I'm working on this project "The effectiveness of Dogme language teaching on EFL learners' reading comprehension" as my thesis in MA TEFL, and would appreciate it if you share your ideas or experiences with me? I seriously need some help cause my professors at Uni don't know so much about Dogme.
      > > >
      > > > Thnx
      > > > Masi
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------
      > >
      > > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
      > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
      > > dogme-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > --
      > Mark Johnstone
      >
      > Alfaisal University Preparatory Program
      > Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
      > upp.edu.sa
      >
    • masee
      Hi again, I was wondering about the underlying foundation of Dogme specially considering reading comprehension, i know it s related to Freir s critical
      Message 2 of 13 , Dec 15, 2012
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        Hi again,

        I was wondering about the underlying foundation of Dogme specially considering reading comprehension, i know it's related to Freir's critical pedagogy,and critical reading,however, wanna know know more so that i can wrap up all the ideas which make a Dogme reading task, you know i read many activities, but as you know I'm doing a research on the effect of Dogme on reading comprehension, so for theoretical background, i need information, would you please help?
        thank you in advance

        --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, "masee" <masee_86@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi Bruno, Leona and Mark
        > Thanks for sharing your ideas, I'm managing to have an experimental course of Dogme on reading comprehension in a few months, will let u know about the results and experience.
        > Best
        > Masi
        >
        > --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, mcjsa@ wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi Bruno,
        > >
        > > Thanks for these interesting ideas on reading. This seems to be casting
        > > "real" reading as instrumental reading where the need is conjured up by
        > > an imagined need. I like the "novel/story" thing. It may be interesting
        > > to cast this as self-narrative that students construct in various media:
        > > print, audio, film, image, mobilizing a broader view of literacy than
        > > the traditionally receptive, print focused one.
        > >
        > > A student self-narrative could be individually or group focused and
        > > might help students to re-negotiate personal and shared identities in
        > > English. This would integrate their reading and writing and give them a
        > > real reason to read. It would be interesting to see the types of things
        > > they choose to read, and since this reading would likely be directed
        > > giving them the tools and inspiration they need to create their own
        > > personal narrative, they would be motivated by a genuine need.
        > >
        > > Recently, I've been moving more toward self-directed reading in my
        > > classes. It takes many weeks for students to understand what this is
        > > about, and why they should do it, so, to pull it off you need to have a
        > > long time with them. I realized that when I selected readings, no matter
        > > how careful I was, or how well I knew the students, what I chose would
        > > not interest more than 5% of any group, and when students are not
        > > interested in a text, their reading is distant, perfunctory, and
        > > disengaged. When this is the case, I cannot justify asking them to read
        > > anything at all. Reading is not something that you do for a class, or
        > > because someone told you to do it. Reading is part of who you are. And
        > > while people are building new identities in a new language, we have an
        > > opportunity to integrate reading into that identity.
        > >
        > > I think that the self-narrative would work with any level student. With
        > > lower levels, the focus would probably be on audio and image, moving
        > > gradually towards textual expression as students' language competency
        > > grows. In many contexts, reading and writing are the most accessible
        > > forms of engagement with a language and it is engagement that builds
        > > competency.
        > >
        > > Mark
        > >
        > >
        > > On Tue, Oct 23, 2012, at 09:46 AM, Bruno LEYS wrote:
        > > > Dear Leona, Masi and others
        > > >
        > > > I totally agree with how Leona's stresses the importance of a "real need
        > > > to read". I quite like the movie descriptions activity. You could also
        > > > deal with TV programmes (use a TV guide and decide what to watch
        > > > tonight).
        > > > Similar activities can be holiday/hotel brochures where students choose a
        > > > programme of activities / or discuss which hotel they would choose
        > > > (taking into account price, facilities, other traveller's reviews ...).
        > > >
        > > > I also quite like the 'Wall Papers' (reading a newspaper together)
        > > > activity from "the book" (p. 55). I have tried it out several times
        > > > myself and each time it turns out to be a great lesson.
        > > >
        > > > News stories with catchy headlines (like 'The boy who came out from the
        > > > cold' in 'A Framework for Task-Based Learning' - Jane Willis) make the
        > > > students formulate their own comprehension questions (This is what I'd
        > > > like to find out in this article, text...
        > > >
        > > > It can also work with a novel/story. You start reading an exciting part,
        > > > taken from in the middle of the story. The students discuss what might
        > > > have preceded these events, formulate ideas on relationships between the
        > > > characters, etc. Quite often they will want to read the whole story to
        > > > see if they were right.
        > > >
        > > > Kind regards
        > > > Bruno
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Bruno Leys •
        > > > English and TEFL
        > > > KHBO - teacher training department Bruges, Belgium
        > > > http://blog.associatie.kuleuven.be/brunoleys/
        > > > @BrunoLeys
        > > > Tel. +32 50 30 51 00 / 059 56 90 00 • mobile phone: +32 (0)477/856706
        > > > bruno.leys@<mailto:voornaam.naam@> talent@work
        > > > ________________________________
        > > >
        > > > Katholieke Hogeschool Brugge - Oostende
        > > > Campus Xaverianenstraat 10 • B-8200 Campus Brugge • http://www.khbo.be/
        > > > ________________________________
        > > > Van: dogme@yahoogroups.com [dogme@yahoogroups.com] namens leonitanz
        > > > [leonitanz@]
        > > > Verzonden: maandag 22 oktober 2012 22:27
        > > > Aan: dogme@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Onderwerp: [dogme] Re: Dogme and reading comprehension
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Hi Masi,
        > > >
        > > > I am also interested in how the Dogme approach looks in a classroom. Have
        > > > you had anyone contributing ideas for your thesis? For me, teaching
        > > > reading goes hand and hand with writing, we have a shared experience,
        > > > write about it, then read and share stories that we all have prior
        > > > knowledgeof the content, comprehension easily follows. Reading
        > > > comprehension alone represents more of a challenge as the material is
        > > > from an external source. So as a teacher I have to create a real need for
        > > > the students to want to comprehend the information. For example, we are
        > > > going to make something in the class, I give them written instructions to
        > > > follow, we are going to watch a movie so I give them different movie
        > > > descriptions so they can choose which one they want to watch, from our
        > > > conversation we need to find information so we access the material to
        > > > find answers. All reading in my class has a real purpose for everyone. So
        > > > I would be interested in anyone else sharing some of their techniques for
        > > > creating a "real need to read" in the classroom!
        > > > Thanks
        > > > Leona
        > > >
        > > > --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com<mailto:dogme%40yahoogroups.com>, "masee"
        > > > <masee_86@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Hey everybody
        > > > >
        > > > > I wanna know more about Dogme kind of teaching reading comprehension in upper intermediate levels, you know I'm working on this project "The effectiveness of Dogme language teaching on EFL learners' reading comprehension" as my thesis in MA TEFL, and would appreciate it if you share your ideas or experiences with me? I seriously need some help cause my professors at Uni don't know so much about Dogme.
        > > > >
        > > > > Thnx
        > > > > Masi
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > ------------------------------------
        > > >
        > > > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@
        > > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
        > > > dogme-unsubscribe@! Groups Links
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > --
        > > Mark Johnstone
        > >
        > > Alfaisal University Preparatory Program
        > > Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
        > > upp.edu.sa
        > >
        >
      • Robert Haines
        Hi Masi, In the hope that it s not too late to reply, I ve uploaded a paper from The Asian Social Science Journal to the Files section. You should be able to
        Message 3 of 13 , Jan 5, 2013
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          Hi Masi,

          In the hope that it's not too late to reply, I've uploaded a paper from The Asian Social Science Journal to the Files section. You should be able to access the file here: http://tinyurl.com/a3kht9r

          The article, despite it's misspelled title (guess the peer-review missed that?), provides a basic theoretical overview with some practical tips for the classroom. If nothing else, it's a start.

          Best,
          Rob
          On Dec 15, 2012, at 3:14 AM, masee wrote:

          > Hi again,
          >
          > I was wondering about the underlying foundation of Dogme specially considering reading comprehension, i know it's related to Freir's critical pedagogy,and critical reading,however, wanna know know more so that i can wrap up all the ideas which make a Dogme reading task, you know i read many activities, but as you know I'm doing a research on the effect of Dogme on reading comprehension, so for theoretical background, i need information, would you please help?
          > thank you in advance
          >
          > --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, "masee" <masee_86@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Hi Bruno, Leona and Mark
          > > Thanks for sharing your ideas, I'm managing to have an experimental course of Dogme on reading comprehension in a few months, will let u know about the results and experience.
          > > Best
          > > Masi
          > >
          > > --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, mcjsa@ wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi Bruno,
          > > >
          > > > Thanks for these interesting ideas on reading. This seems to be casting
          > > > "real" reading as instrumental reading where the need is conjured up by
          > > > an imagined need. I like the "novel/story" thing. It may be interesting
          > > > to cast this as self-narrative that students construct in various media:
          > > > print, audio, film, image, mobilizing a broader view of literacy than
          > > > the traditionally receptive, print focused one.
          > > >
          > > > A student self-narrative could be individually or group focused and
          > > > might help students to re-negotiate personal and shared identities in
          > > > English. This would integrate their reading and writing and give them a
          > > > real reason to read. It would be interesting to see the types of things
          > > > they choose to read, and since this reading would likely be directed
          > > > giving them the tools and inspiration they need to create their own
          > > > personal narrative, they would be motivated by a genuine need.
          > > >
          > > > Recently, I've been moving more toward self-directed reading in my
          > > > classes. It takes many weeks for students to understand what this is
          > > > about, and why they should do it, so, to pull it off you need to have a
          > > > long time with them. I realized that when I selected readings, no matter
          > > > how careful I was, or how well I knew the students, what I chose would
          > > > not interest more than 5% of any group, and when students are not
          > > > interested in a text, their reading is distant, perfunctory, and
          > > > disengaged. When this is the case, I cannot justify asking them to read
          > > > anything at all. Reading is not something that you do for a class, or
          > > > because someone told you to do it. Reading is part of who you are. And
          > > > while people are building new identities in a new language, we have an
          > > > opportunity to integrate reading into that identity.
          > > >
          > > > I think that the self-narrative would work with any level student. With
          > > > lower levels, the focus would probably be on audio and image, moving
          > > > gradually towards textual expression as students' language competency
          > > > grows. In many contexts, reading and writing are the most accessible
          > > > forms of engagement with a language and it is engagement that builds
          > > > competency.
          > > >
          > > > Mark
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > On Tue, Oct 23, 2012, at 09:46 AM, Bruno LEYS wrote:
          > > > > Dear Leona, Masi and others
          > > > >
          > > > > I totally agree with how Leona's stresses the importance of a "real need
          > > > > to read". I quite like the movie descriptions activity. You could also
          > > > > deal with TV programmes (use a TV guide and decide what to watch
          > > > > tonight).
          > > > > Similar activities can be holiday/hotel brochures where students choose a
          > > > > programme of activities / or discuss which hotel they would choose
          > > > > (taking into account price, facilities, other traveller's reviews ...).
          > > > >
          > > > > I also quite like the 'Wall Papers' (reading a newspaper together)
          > > > > activity from "the book" (p. 55). I have tried it out several times
          > > > > myself and each time it turns out to be a great lesson.
          > > > >
          > > > > News stories with catchy headlines (like 'The boy who came out from the
          > > > > cold' in 'A Framework for Task-Based Learning' - Jane Willis) make the
          > > > > students formulate their own comprehension questions (This is what I'd
          > > > > like to find out in this article, text...
          > > > >
          > > > > It can also work with a novel/story. You start reading an exciting part,
          > > > > taken from in the middle of the story. The students discuss what might
          > > > > have preceded these events, formulate ideas on relationships between the
          > > > > characters, etc. Quite often they will want to read the whole story to
          > > > > see if they were right.
          > > > >
          > > > > Kind regards
          > > > > Bruno
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Bruno Leys �
          > > > > English and TEFL
          > > > > KHBO - teacher training department Bruges, Belgium
          > > > > http://blog.associatie.kuleuven.be/brunoleys/
          > > > > @BrunoLeys
          > > > > Tel. +32 50 30 51 00 / 059 56 90 00 � mobile phone: +32 (0)477/856706
          > > > > bruno.leys@<mailto:voornaam.naam@> talent@work
          > > > > ________________________________
          > > > >
          > > > > Katholieke Hogeschool Brugge - Oostende
          > > > > Campus Xaverianenstraat 10 � B-8200 Campus Brugge � http://www.khbo.be/
          > > > > ________________________________
          > > > > Van: dogme@yahoogroups.com [dogme@yahoogroups.com] namens leonitanz
          > > > > [leonitanz@]
          > > > > Verzonden: maandag 22 oktober 2012 22:27
          > > > > Aan: dogme@yahoogroups.com
          > > > > Onderwerp: [dogme] Re: Dogme and reading comprehension
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > Hi Masi,
          > > > >
          > > > > I am also interested in how the Dogme approach looks in a classroom. Have
          > > > > you had anyone contributing ideas for your thesis? For me, teaching
          > > > > reading goes hand and hand with writing, we have a shared experience,
          > > > > write about it, then read and share stories that we all have prior
          > > > > knowledgeof the content, comprehension easily follows. Reading
          > > > > comprehension alone represents more of a challenge as the material is
          > > > > from an external source. So as a teacher I have to create a real need for
          > > > > the students to want to comprehend the information. For example, we are
          > > > > going to make something in the class, I give them written instructions to
          > > > > follow, we are going to watch a movie so I give them different movie
          > > > > descriptions so they can choose which one they want to watch, from our
          > > > > conversation we need to find information so we access the material to
          > > > > find answers. All reading in my class has a real purpose for everyone. So
          > > > > I would be interested in anyone else sharing some of their techniques for
          > > > > creating a "real need to read" in the classroom!
          > > > > Thanks
          > > > > Leona
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com<mailto:dogme%40yahoogroups.com>, "masee"
          > > > > <masee_86@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Hey everybody
          > > > > >
          > > > > > I wanna know more about Dogme kind of teaching reading comprehension in upper intermediate levels, you know I'm working on this project "The effectiveness of Dogme language teaching on EFL learners' reading comprehension" as my thesis in MA TEFL, and would appreciate it if you share your ideas or experiences with me? I seriously need some help cause my professors at Uni don't know so much about Dogme.
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Thnx
          > > > > > Masi
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > > ------------------------------------
          > > > >
          > > > > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@
          > > > > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
          > > > > dogme-unsubscribe@! Groups Links
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > >
          > > > --
          > > > Mark Johnstone
          > > >
          > > > Alfaisal University Preparatory Program
          > > > Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
          > > > upp.edu.sa
          > > >
          > >
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • mcjsa@123mail.org
          Hi Rob, Can you post the full URL to this article. Tiny is blocked in Saudi Arabia (and possibly in many other block prone places). Mark
          Message 4 of 13 , Jan 5, 2013
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            Hi Rob,

            Can you post the full URL to this article. Tiny is blocked in Saudi
            Arabia (and possibly in many other block prone places).

            Mark

            On Sun, Jan 6, 2013, at 04:12 AM, Robert Haines wrote:
            > Hi Masi,
            >
            > In the hope that it's not too late to reply, I've uploaded a paper from
            > The Asian Social Science Journal to the Files section. You should be able
            > to access the file here: http://tinyurl.com/a3kht9r
            >
            > The article, despite it's misspelled title (guess the peer-review missed
            > that?), provides a basic theoretical overview with some practical tips
            > for the classroom. If nothing else, it's a start.
            >
            > Best,
            > Rob
          • Robert Haines
            Hi Mark, Sorry about the inconvenience to you and anyone else that didn t work for. Did you also try the Files section on this listserv? Here s the shortest of
            Message 5 of 13 , Jan 6, 2013
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              Hi Mark,

              Sorry about the inconvenience to you and anyone else that didn't work for. Did you also try the Files section on this listserv?

              Here's the shortest of the long URLs I found: http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/2993/2761

              Rob
              On Jan 5, 2013, at 7:06 PM, mcjsa@... wrote:

              > Hi Rob,
              >
              > Can you post the full URL to this article. Tiny is blocked in Saudi
              > Arabia (and possibly in many other block prone places).
              >
              > Mark
              >
              > On Sun, Jan 6, 2013, at 04:12 AM, Robert Haines wrote:
              > > Hi Masi,
              > >
              > > In the hope that it's not too late to reply, I've uploaded a paper from
              > > The Asian Social Science Journal to the Files section. You should be able
              > > to access the file here: http://tinyurl.com/a3kht9r
              > >
              > > The article, despite it's misspelled title (guess the peer-review missed
              > > that?), provides a basic theoretical overview with some practical tips
              > > for the classroom. If nothing else, it's a start.
              > >
              > > Best,
              > > Rob
              >



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • mcjsa@123mail.org
              Hi Rob, Thanks. No I didn t look in the files section. I m an old fashioned email only type user and I forgot this list has a website! Mark ... -- Mark
              Message 6 of 13 , Jan 6, 2013
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                Hi Rob,

                Thanks. No I didn't look in the files section. I'm an old fashioned
                email only type user and I forgot this list has a website!

                Mark

                On Mon, Jan 7, 2013, at 03:07 AM, Robert Haines wrote:
                > Hi Mark,
                >
                > Sorry about the inconvenience to you and anyone else that didn't work
                > for. Did you also try the Files section on this listserv?
                >
                > Here's the shortest of the long URLs I found:
                > http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/2993/2761
                >
                > Rob
                > On Jan 5, 2013, at 7:06 PM, mcjsa@... wrote:
                >
                > > Hi Rob,
                > >
                > > Can you post the full URL to this article. Tiny is blocked in Saudi
                > > Arabia (and possibly in many other block prone places).
                > >
                > > Mark
                > >
                > > On Sun, Jan 6, 2013, at 04:12 AM, Robert Haines wrote:
                > > > Hi Masi,
                > > >
                > > > In the hope that it's not too late to reply, I've uploaded a paper from
                > > > The Asian Social Science Journal to the Files section. You should be able
                > > > to access the file here: http://tinyurl.com/a3kht9r
                > > >
                > > > The article, despite it's misspelled title (guess the peer-review missed
                > > > that?), provides a basic theoretical overview with some practical tips
                > > > for the classroom. If nothing else, it's a start.
                > > >
                > > > Best,
                > > > Rob
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >
                > ------------------------------------
                >
                > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
                > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to:
                > dogme-unsubscribe@...! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >


                --
                Mark Johnstone

                Alfaisal University Preparatory Program
                Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
                upp.edu.sa
              • masee
                Hi Rob, Thank you so much for the file,I m sure it will help me a lot Masi
                Message 7 of 13 , Jan 7, 2013
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                  Hi Rob,

                  Thank you so much for the file,I'm sure it will help me a lot

                  Masi


                  --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, Robert Haines wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Mark,
                  >
                  > Sorry about the inconvenience to you and anyone else that didn't work for. Did you also try the Files section on this listserv?
                  >
                  > Here's the shortest of the long URLs I found: http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/2993/2761
                  >
                  > Rob
                  > On Jan 5, 2013, at 7:06 PM, mcjsa@... wrote:
                  >
                  > > Hi Rob,
                  > >
                  > > Can you post the full URL to this article. Tiny is blocked in Saudi
                  > > Arabia (and possibly in many other block prone places).
                  > >
                  > > Mark
                  > >
                  > > On Sun, Jan 6, 2013, at 04:12 AM, Robert Haines wrote:
                  > > > Hi Masi,
                  > > >
                  > > > In the hope that it's not too late to reply, I've uploaded a paper from
                  > > > The Asian Social Science Journal to the Files section. You should be able
                  > > > to access the file here: http://tinyurl.com/a3kht9r
                  > > >
                  > > > The article, despite it's misspelled title (guess the peer-review missed
                  > > > that?), provides a basic theoretical overview with some practical tips
                  > > > for the classroom. If nothing else, it's a start.
                  > > >
                  > > > Best,
                  > > > Rob
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • mcjsa@123mail.org
                  I found the article useful on several points and particularly liked the way Huang put decoding and text analysis into the context of why people read. Huang
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jan 7, 2013
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                    I found the article useful on several points and particularly liked the
                    way Huang put decoding and text analysis into the context of why people
                    read. Huang offers five types of teaching "strategies" for a
                    constructivist reading of reading:



                    1. providing a purpose
                    2. modeling
                    3. questioning
                    4. integrating macroskills
                    5. author awareness



                    These focus on getting students to look beyond form and discover
                    meaning either collaboratively or individually. Many students need to
                    be trained in collaboration: just being directed to do something does
                    not mean they can do it. Similarly, new demands such as "analyze a
                    tourist brochure, gather useful vocabulary and sentence structures,
                    then write your own brochure" - an activity that is described in the
                    section on integrating macroskills - may not be immediately
                    comprehensible to students used to a focus on content -- where an
                    ability to repeat content is taken as prima facie evidence of
                    understanding.



                    Huang does stress that students should be able to choose what they
                    read, though this is difficult to achieve in many teaching situations,
                    particularly when the concepts of "book" and "curriculum" are closely
                    identified one with the other. Here, student choice may be seen as a
                    direct threat to administration and supervision authority.



                    I did find it useful for the attempt to draw on constructivism in order
                    to design classroom activities that focus on understanding and
                    collaboration. I think this is at the heart of Dogme. I watched Luke's
                    seminar on BBC English yesterday that was posted in another thread
                    recently. I can see how this method could be used to explore language
                    emerging from a "tourist brochure" - perhaps more effectively than an
                    analysis of vocabulary and structured in the brochure itself - or as a
                    pre-writing activity.



                    Dogme seems to be rooted in a constructivst view of learning and
                    whether you view it as a method or a methodology, we can always find
                    interesting applications.



                    Thanks for the article.



                    Mark



                    On Tue, Jan 8, 2013, at 02:10 AM, masee wrote:



                    Hi Rob,
                    Thank you so much for the file,I'm sure it will help me a lot
                    Masi
                    --- In [1]dogme@yahoogroups.com, Robert Haines wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Mark,
                    >
                    > Sorry about the inconvenience to you and anyone else that didn't work
                    for. Did you also try the Files section on this listserv?
                    >
                    > Here's the shortest of the long URLs I found:
                    [2]http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/2993/2761
                    >
                    > Rob
                    > On Jan 5, 2013, at 7:06 PM, mcjsa@... wrote:
                    >
                    > > Hi Rob,
                    > >
                    > > Can you post the full URL to this article. Tiny is blocked in Saudi
                    > > Arabia (and possibly in many other block prone places).
                    > >
                    > > Mark
                    > >
                    > > On Sun, Jan 6, 2013, at 04:12 AM, Robert Haines wrote:
                    > > > Hi Masi,
                    > > >
                    > > > In the hope that it's not too late to reply, I've uploaded a
                    paper from
                    > > > The Asian Social Science Journal to the Files section. You should
                    be able
                    > > > to access the file here: [3]http://tinyurl.com/a3kht9r
                    > > >
                    > > > The article, despite it's misspelled title (guess the peer-review
                    missed
                    > > > that?), provides a basic theoretical overview with some practical
                    tips
                    > > > for the classroom. If nothing else, it's a start.
                    > > >
                    > > > Best,
                    > > > Rob
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >




                    --

                    Mark Johnstone



                    Alfaisal University Preparatory Program

                    Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

                    upp.edu.sa

                    References

                    1. mailto:dogme%40yahoogroups.com
                    2. http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/2993/2761
                    3. http://tinyurl.com/a3kht9r
                    4. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJxcGcxcjRpBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BG1zZ0lkAzE3NDAzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTM1NzYwMTY2Mg--?act=reply&messageNum=17403
                    5. mailto:masee_86@...?subject=Re%3A%20Dogme%20and%20reading%20comprehension
                    6. mailto:dogme@yahoogroups.com?subject=Re%3A%20Dogme%20and%20reading%20comprehension
                    7. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJlZnN0ZzgxBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTM1NzYwMTY2Mg--
                    8. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/message/17359;_ylc=X3oDMTM2Y2NlaWY2BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BG1zZ0lkAzE3NDAzBHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTM1NzYwMTY2MgR0cGNJZAMxNzM1OQ--
                    9. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/members;_ylc=X3oDMTJmZGR2cHZzBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZtYnJzBHN0aW1lAzEzNTc2MDE2NjI-?o=6
                    10. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/files;_ylc=X3oDMTJncTAxYjFjBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZmaWxlcwRzdGltZQMxMzU3NjAxNjYy
                    11. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme;_ylc=X3oDMTJlZmEwbWI4BF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTM1NzYwMTY2Mg--
                    12. http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJkZGpycWtrBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxMzU3NjAxNjYy
                    13. mailto:dogme-traditional@yahoogroups.com?subject=Change%20Delivery%20Format:%20Traditional
                    14. mailto:dogme-digest@yahoogroups.com?subject=Email%20Delivery:%20Digest
                    15. mailto:dogme-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe
                    16. http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    17. mailto:ygroupsnotifications@yahoogroups.com?subject=Feedback%20on%20the%20redesigned%20individual%20mail%20v1


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