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  • natalie8754112
    Hi guys I m a new member. I m just about to crack on with my Experimental Practice assignment as part of DELTA. I am going to do a Dogme lesson and I am
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 28, 2012
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      Hi guys

      I'm a new member. I'm just about to crack on with my Experimental Practice assignment as part of DELTA. I am going to do a Dogme lesson and I am having a big read of all sorts of Dogme stuff.

      I come from an art background, I am a kinaesthetic learner and I am interested in psychology. I don't know if this has anything to do with what I am going to say next. I guess it's just a brain dump.

      I wonder if the writers of course books are (unbeknownst to them) doing it mainly for themselves. I'll explain.

      You teach for a few or more years and you learn all the McNugget units (Unit 1 Past Simple). You become so familiar with course books that you start to criticise them and think 'I could write this better myself' (I have thought that on occasion).

      I know that when I have thought about writing a new course book, it isn't with my students in mind, it's really just a project for myself, a consolidation of what I know and how I can show that off and make it so it is more suited to my interests.
      It would be a great revision for myself as a teacher to re-write terms and grammar rules and different types of activities.Whilst I'm doing that, am I really thinking about my learners?

      Well, I said it was just a brain dump. I must add that I like course books and I would not want to offend any course book writers. I have just had the pleasure of doing my DELTA orientation course with a course book writer and he was a true inspiration to me, aside from being a person who does think about learners' needs.

      PS...Anyone done their DELTA EP on Dogme? I'd love to share your ideas of how you did your lesson plan!

      Natalie
    • Hanieh Akbarimehr
      Hello Natalie, The idea of writing (or better to say adapting in my case) a coursebook came to my mind too, and interesting enough while doing the DELTA just
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 28, 2012
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        Hello Natalie,

        The idea of writing (or better to say adapting in my case) a coursebook came to my mind too, and interesting enough while doing the DELTA just like you, probably because of the nature of the course. However, I'd change one or two parts of each lesson in a course book to call 'my' coursebook a perfect one rather than write a whole new book. I guess you would like to create a book solely for yourself and people who have the same interests, personality and learning style. There might be many people like you but that wouldn't be a fit for all course book again (should it be?), unless you do that with your learners' needs and interest at that stage on mind.

        As for the DELTA assignment, I did mine on Dogme, and I must admit that this Yahoo group (especially Scott, Diarmuid, Anthony, Oli, Phil and Dennis ) was truly a great help and without them I wouldn't have been able to do such a lesson. I did it with almost zero beginners last year and it went VERY well! I'd share my assignment and resources if you're interested, just let me know. I also have some sample assignments on Dogme that some nice people in here shared with me. It gives you an idea of what a dogme assignment looks like. I'd say go for it. Doing a dogme lesson is a challenging and yet rewarding approach that every teacher should do as a technique in his/her class at the very least in my idea. Just send me an Email if I can be of any help.

        Good luck,
        Hanieh


        ________________________________
        From: natalie8754112 <nuts121@...>
        To: dogme@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 6:35 PM
        Subject: [dogme] Course Books


         
        Hi guys

        I'm a new member. I'm just about to crack on with my Experimental Practice assignment as part of DELTA. I am going to do a Dogme lesson and I am having a big read of all sorts of Dogme stuff.

        I come from an art background, I am a kinaesthetic learner and I am interested in psychology. I don't know if this has anything to do with what I am going to say next. I guess it's just a brain dump.

        I wonder if the writers of course books are (unbeknownst to them) doing it mainly for themselves. I'll explain.

        You teach for a few or more years and you learn all the McNugget units (Unit 1 Past Simple). You become so familiar with course books that you start to criticise them and think 'I could write this better myself' (I have thought that on occasion).

        I know that when I have thought about writing a new course book, it isn't with my students in mind, it's really just a project for myself, a consolidation of what I know and how I can show that off and make it so it is more suited to my interests.
        It would be a great revision for myself as a teacher to re-write terms and grammar rules and different types of activities.Whilst I'm doing that, am I really thinking about my learners?

        Well, I said it was just a brain dump. I must add that I like course books and I would not want to offend any course book writers. I have just had the pleasure of doing my DELTA orientation course with a course book writer and he was a true inspiration to me, aside from being a person who does think about learners' needs.

        PS...Anyone done their DELTA EP on Dogme? I'd love to share your ideas of how you did your lesson plan!

        Natalie




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Eric Roth
        May I suggest that you write that coursebook? You may find that it travels far more than you have, and even earns you more than a few dollars. Many English
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 29, 2012
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          May I suggest that you write that coursebook? You may find that it travels
          far more than you have, and even earns you more than a few dollars. Many
          English language learners remain thirsty for English conversation in their
          classes, and too few books, classes, and courses provide them with enough
          opportunities for authentic conversation.

          Allow me to share some related experiences from teaching ESL conversation
          in the United States. While teaching a multilevel conversation class in
          Santa Monica Community College for immigrants and international students, I
          quickly decided to abandon the expensive, weak textbook. Perhaps we could
          just share experiences and I would clarify pronunciation and grammar as
          problems emerged. Perhaps I could - more or less - wing it.

          Yet given my weaknesses and strengths, I quickly discovered that I need
          more than a topic and a few conversation starters to keep the two hour
          class of intermediate to advanced students going. As I result, I started to
          prepare collections of conversation questions, thematic proverbs, and
          related quotations from many differing perspectives for each class to
          provide a clear structure. Students would talk, and talk. We often shared
          insights and laughs. Relationships deepened. Vocabulary expanded.

          And the class become popular, and the increased number of students from a
          dozen to 40 posed more problems and required greater emphasis on group work
          and even homework. Students registered - and re-registered for the course.
          A new conversation class was added for the now "advanced" speakers.

          When I presented at a CATESOL conference, two teachers told me that this
          was a "dogme" style. Perhaps it was. I seldom knew what grammar or
          pronunciation points would come up. Students did almost all the talking. My
          work consisted mostly in raising questions, and circling around helping in
          small groups. Eventually, I put the lessons together in a book called
          Compelling Conversations: Questions and Quotations on Timeless Topics. You
          can find sample chapters and teacher worksheets here.
          http://www.compellingconversations.com/sample-chapters-combined.php

          http://www.compellingconversations.com/worksheets.php

          So write that Dogme coursebook. You might be quite surprised at the
          results.



          On Fri, Sep 28, 2012 at 12:37 PM, Hanieh Akbarimehr <
          akbarimehr2000@...> wrote:

          > Hello Natalie,
          >
          > The idea of writing (or better to say adapting in my case) a coursebook
          > came to my mind too, and interesting enough while doing the DELTA just like
          > you, probably because of the nature of the course. However, I'd change one
          > or two parts of each lesson in a course book to call 'my' coursebook a
          > perfect one rather than write a whole new book. I guess you would like to
          > create a book solely for yourself and people who have the same interests,
          > personality and learning style. There might be many people like you but
          > that wouldn't be a fit for all course book again (should it be?), unless
          > you do that with your learners' needs and interest at that stage on mind.
          >
          > As for the DELTA assignment, I did mine on Dogme, and I must admit that
          > this Yahoo group (especially Scott, Diarmuid, Anthony, Oli, Phil and Dennis
          > ) was truly a great help and without them I wouldn't have been able to do
          > such a lesson. I did it with almost zero beginners last year and it went
          > VERY well! I'd share my assignment and resources if you're interested, just
          > let me know. I also have some sample assignments on Dogme that some nice
          > people in here shared with me. It gives you an idea of what a dogme
          > assignment looks like. I'd say go for it. Doing a dogme lesson is a
          > challenging and yet rewarding approach that every teacher should do as a
          > technique in his/her class at the very least in my idea. Just send me an
          > Email if I can be of any help.
          >
          > Good luck,
          > Hanieh
          >
          >
          > ________________________________
          > From: natalie8754112 <nuts121@...>
          > To: dogme@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Friday, September 28, 2012 6:35 PM
          > Subject: [dogme] Course Books
          >
          >
          >
          > Hi guys
          >
          > I'm a new member. I'm just about to crack on with my Experimental Practice
          > assignment as part of DELTA. I am going to do a Dogme lesson and I am
          > having a big read of all sorts of Dogme stuff.
          >
          > I come from an art background, I am a kinaesthetic learner and I am
          > interested in psychology. I don't know if this has anything to do with
          > what I am going to say next. I guess it's just a brain dump.
          >
          > I wonder if the writers of course books are (unbeknownst to them) doing it
          > mainly for themselves. I'll explain.
          >
          > You teach for a few or more years and you learn all the McNugget units
          > (Unit 1 Past Simple). You become so familiar with course books that you
          > start to criticise them and think 'I could write this better myself' (I
          > have thought that on occasion).
          >
          > I know that when I have thought about writing a new course book, it isn't
          > with my students in mind, it's really just a project for myself, a
          > consolidation of what I know and how I can show that off and make it so it
          > is more suited to my interests.
          > It would be a great revision for myself as a teacher to re-write terms and
          > grammar rules and different types of activities.Whilst I'm doing that, am I
          > really thinking about my learners?
          >
          > Well, I said it was just a brain dump. I must add that I like course books
          > and I would not want to offend any course book writers. I have just had the
          > pleasure of doing my DELTA orientation course with a course book writer and
          > he was a true inspiration to me, aside from being a person who does think
          > about learners' needs.
          >
          > PS...Anyone done their DELTA EP on Dogme? I'd love to share your ideas of
          > how you did your lesson plan!
          >
          > Natalie
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >
          > ------------------------------------
          >
          > To Post a message, send it to: dogme@...
          > To Unsubscribe, send a blank message to: dogme-unsubscribe@...!
          > Groups Links
          >
          >
          >
          >


          --
          Shalom,

          Eric H. Roth
          Co- Publisher, Chimayo Press <http://www.ChimayoPress.com>
          Co-author of Compelling Conversations<http://www.CompellingConversations.com>
          eric@...
          www.CompellingConversations.com

          Chimayo Press
          3766 Redwood Ave.
          Los Angeles, CA 90066-3506
          USA

          "Education is an ornament in prosperity, and a refuge in adversity."
          Aristotle


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Robert Horne
          Just let them take you, you ll find stuff coming up you never expected - I did Dogme for my experimental practice a few years back - it was an adventure. From:
          Message 4 of 4 , Sep 29, 2012
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            Just let them take you, you'll find stuff coming up you never expected - I did Dogme for my experimental practice a few years back - it was an adventure.

            From: natalie8754112 <nuts121@...>
            To: dogme@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Friday, 28 September 2012, 6:35
            Subject: [dogme] Course Books


             
            Hi guys

            I'm a new member. I'm just about to crack on with my Experimental Practice assignment as part of DELTA. I am going to do a Dogme lesson and I am having a big read of all sorts of Dogme stuff.

            I come from an art background, I am a kinaesthetic learner and I am interested in psychology. I don't know if this has anything to do with what I am going to say next. I guess it's just a brain dump.

            I wonder if the writers of course books are (unbeknownst to them) doing it mainly for themselves. I'll explain.

            You teach for a few or more years and you learn all the McNugget units (Unit 1 Past Simple). You become so familiar with course books that you start to criticise them and think 'I could write this better myself' (I have thought that on occasion).

            I know that when I have thought about writing a new course book, it isn't with my students in mind, it's really just a project for myself, a consolidation of what I know and how I can show that off and make it so it is more suited to my interests.
            It would be a great revision for myself as a teacher to re-write terms and grammar rules and different types of activities.Whilst I'm doing that, am I really thinking about my learners?

            Well, I said it was just a brain dump. I must add that I like course books and I would not want to offend any course book writers. I have just had the pleasure of doing my DELTA orientation course with a course book writer and he was a true inspiration to me, aside from being a person who does think about learners' needs.

            PS...Anyone done their DELTA EP on Dogme? I'd love to share your ideas of how you did your lesson plan!

            Natalie




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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