Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Critical reflection among language learners

Expand Messages
  • Robert Haines
    Recently, it was intimated that, since the students I work with have long breaks between classes, I might consider assigning more homework. I m certainly not
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 1, 2012
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      Recently, it was intimated that, since the students I work with have
      long breaks between classes, I might consider assigning more homework.
      I'm certainly not against homework, but I do find it should be
      meaningful and provide affordances to the extent possible. So, on this
      occasion, I apprised students of the situation then asked them to
      share their opinions about having more homework in the form of an
      argumentative essay.

      I've not finished reading all the essays, but I assure you these
      students' writing has seldom, if ever, before been so coherent,
      cohesive, and persuasive. Not every argument is against more homework,
      by the way, and some students have done a fine job of presenting the
      case for or against more homework before presenting their own counter-
      argument.

      These essays come on the heels of a class debate the students had
      about whether their grant-sponsored program, funded by the US
      government, should be continued or abolished. After the first debate,
      the students switched sides and argued from the opposite side of the
      table. It was an excellent opportunity for them to think critically
      about the mission of the scholarship they have been awarded and what
      it means for them and their communities, both here and in their
      countries.

      I hope to continue what I'm calling a sort of critical reflection
      among these learners on their context and the learning they do. Any
      suggestions are welcome.

      Rob
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.