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Autumn comes (Week 1)

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  • Robert Haines
    It s 8 am, Monday morning. I ll leave in an hour to begin the second week of fall term. As the heat and light of summer fade, rain sets in here in the Pacific
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 3, 2011
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      It's 8 am, Monday morning. I'll leave in an hour to begin the second
      week of fall term. As the heat and light of summer fade, rain sets in
      here in the Pacific Northwest though it's still warm enough for beans
      to sprout in the garden and crocuses to bloom. Fresh berries are still
      abundant.

      The first week was a good start to the term. The struggle, for me, has
      been adjusting to the new schedule, especially Monday in the computer
      lab, where students sit in narrow cubes at computers with me at the
      front of the room. Last week (first week), I demonstrated how to use
      some ELT websites such as http://www.elllo.org/ In general, I've tried
      to incorporate what some might call a Dogme 2.0 approach into the
      curriculum this year, beginning in the summer when we had four hours a
      day in a multi-media room, which means a computer at the front with
      DVD player, stereo, and a projector. There was also a visual presenter
      (high-tech OHP) in the room. This term I've started paying more
      attention to Russel Stannard's bevy of screencasts at http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/
      in order to educate myself about web tools that might enhance my
      teaching and students' learning. One application, with which I was
      already familiar, is Jing http://www.techsmith.com/jing/ I've used it
      for feedback on student writing. As with any of the tools I've
      discovered, Jing takes a bit of practice if you want to use it
      effectively. I wonder how many of my colleagues around the world have
      time to fiddle with these tools and think about how to use them in
      class. Will the same assumptions that many teachers tap into in order
      to use textbooks someday apply to digital media, so that an app
      becomes second nature to the average ELT-er? We're certainly not there
      yet. Do we want to be?

      It's too early for me to have a strong impression of what the students
      I work with think about my "Dogmedtech approach". So far, they seem to
      enjoy the Dogme part of it. As for the edtech, using computers is
      still relatively new to some students, especially if they use them for
      anything other than a PowerPoint presentation, email, or FaceBook.
      Part of my goal is to help the students surf the Web safely, finding
      the resources they need to learn English and find reference materials
      for their upcoming coursework in their Environmental Technology
      curriculum as some students just start clicking links (often ads) and
      entering personal information here and there. For some, it's the
      interaction between human and computer to which they must adjust:
      sitting at a screen, using a mouse to navigate, and having so much
      information in front of them.

      So far, I have the impression that our face-to-face dogmetic classes,
      in groups of nine to ten, are most fruitful for us all; however, I am
      intent on enhancing these sessions through the use of edtech tools. I
      am cautious in this endeavor, because I think there's a sort of
      tipping point at which the tech becomes the dominant factor for
      learners and teacher, the human element falls by the wayside. Just as
      long-term smartphone users sometimes sense a phantom vibration - so
      I've heard and read - too much of the virtual world can cast a glaze
      over meaningful human interaction crafted through our inherent media
      tools (ie, our natural senses). I want to sustain the brightness and
      animation of our face-to-face interaction.

      Ha - look at the time!

      Any suggestions or criticism welcome. Hope you are faring well in your
      own pedagogical pursuits.

      Rob

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • mcjsa@123mail.org
      Hi Rob, Thanks for your interesting description of your use of information technology in your dogme class. I ve been using these tools for quite some time now,
      Message 2 of 8 , Oct 3, 2011
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        Hi Rob,

        Thanks for your interesting description of your use of
        information technology in your dogme class.

        I've been using these tools for quite some time now, including
        Jing. I think it's easy to become distracted with the technology.
        My students are 18 to 20 year old men. They are all "digital
        natives" which means that all I need to do is say bring a laptop
        to class and my class is completely equipped the next day for
        whatever I want to do (we have wireless Internet throughout our
        facility).

        I don't think that the technology gets in the way at all. It is
        just a tool, like a pen and paper sometimes literally: have a
        look at wallwisher - http://www.wallwisher.com/ this can be used
        to support face to face interaction in really interesting ways,
        and there's lots more like that.

        I'm teaching composition to advanced EFL/ESL students (some are
        actually native speakers). Today I was using www.schmmop.com
        essay writer bot with them in class. How do you collaboratively
        write a "five paragraph essay" or any other EFL monstrosity?
        Essay bots can structure lots of chaotic input for you, letting
        you focus on ideas wile it does the organization.

        There are lots of ways to use technology in class and
        fortunately, I don't have to sit students in little boxes, all in
        a row, to use computers. My students lie scattered in little
        groups and piles, all over the floor with their laptops as I
        tiptoe around among them, watching what they're doing.

        Show them in the lab amd have some fun.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFUHgDo4-Lg

        Mark

        On Monday, October 03, 2011 8:58 AM, "Robert Haines"
        <hainesrm@...> wrote:


        It's 8 am, Monday morning. I'll leave in an hour to begin the
        second
        week of fall term. As the heat and light of summer fade, rain
        sets in
        here in the Pacific Northwest though it's still warm enough for
        beans
        to sprout in the garden and crocuses to bloom. Fresh berries are
        still
        abundant.
        The first week was a good start to the term. The struggle, for
        me, has
        been adjusting to the new schedule, especially Monday in the
        computer
        lab, where students sit in narrow cubes at computers with me at
        the
        front of the room. Last week (first week), I demonstrated how to
        use
        some ELT websites such as [1]http://www.elllo.org/ In general,
        I've tried
        to incorporate what some might call a Dogme 2.0 approach into the
        curriculum this year, beginning in the summer when we had four
        hours a
        day in a multi-media room, which means a computer at the front
        with
        DVD player, stereo, and a projector. There was also a visual
        presenter
        (high-tech OHP) in the room. This term I've started paying more
        attention to Russel Stannard's bevy of screencasts at
        [2]http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/
        in order to educate myself about web tools that might enhance my
        teaching and students' learning. One application, with which I
        was
        already familiar, is Jing [3]http://www.techsmith.com/jing/ I've
        used it
        for feedback on student writing. As with any of the tools I've
        discovered, Jing takes a bit of practice if you want to use it
        effectively. I wonder how many of my colleagues around the world
        have
        time to fiddle with these tools and think about how to use them
        in
        class. Will the same assumptions that many teachers tap into in
        order
        to use textbooks someday apply to digital media, so that an app
        becomes second nature to the average ELT-er? We're certainly not
        there
        yet. Do we want to be?
        It's too early for me to have a strong impression of what the
        students
        I work with think about my "Dogmedtech approach". So far, they
        seem to
        enjoy the Dogme part of it. As for the edtech, using computers is
        still relatively new to some students, especially if they use
        them for
        anything other than a PowerPoint presentation, email, or
        FaceBook.
        Part of my goal is to help the students surf the Web safely,
        finding
        the resources they need to learn English and find reference
        materials
        for their upcoming coursework in their Environmental Technology
        curriculum as some students just start clicking links (often ads)
        and
        entering personal information here and there. For some, it's the
        interaction between human and computer to which they must adjust:
        sitting at a screen, using a mouse to navigate, and having so
        much
        information in front of them.
        So far, I have the impression that our face-to-face dogmetic
        classes,
        in groups of nine to ten, are most fruitful for us all; however,
        I am
        intent on enhancing these sessions through the use of edtech
        tools. I
        am cautious in this endeavor, because I think there's a sort of
        tipping point at which the tech becomes the dominant factor for
        learners and teacher, the human element falls by the wayside.
        Just as
        long-term smartphone users sometimes sense a phantom vibration -
        so
        I've heard and read - too much of the virtual world can cast a
        glaze
        over meaningful human interaction crafted through our inherent
        media
        tools (ie, our natural senses). I want to sustain the brightness
        and
        animation of our face-to-face interaction.
        Ha - look at the time!
        Any suggestions or criticism welcome. Hope you are faring well in
        your
        own pedagogical pursuits.
        Rob
        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



        References

        1. http://www.elllo.org/
        2. http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/
        3. http://www.techsmith.com/jing/
        4. mailto:hainesrm@...?subject=Re%3A%20Autumn%20comes%20%28Week%201%29
        5. mailto:dogme@yahoogroups.com?subject=Re%3A%20Autumn%20comes%20%28Week%201%29
        6. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJxdGZndnRmBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BG1zZ0lkAzE2NTY5BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5Nw--?act=reply&messageNum=16569
        7. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJldjZrNWwyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5Nw--
        8. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/message/16569;_ylc=X3oDMTM2aTYycmViBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BG1zZ0lkAzE2NTY5BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5NwR0cGNJZAMxNjU2OQ--
        9. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/members;_ylc=X3oDMTJmOGliaW1qBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZtYnJzBHN0aW1lAzEzMTc2NTc0OTc-?o=6
        10. http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme;_ylc=X3oDMTJlcTA1cDVkBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5Nw--
        11. http://global.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=15oflvpmv/M=493064.14543979.14562481.13298430/D=groups/S=1705043336:MKP1/Y=YAHOO/EXP=1317664697/L=826f4430-edd8-11e0-921f-63297ee28446/B=oX7sA0PDhFQ-/J=1317657497793489/K=ZQjYrS_1oiquWkkfcFy04w/A=6060255/R=0/SIG=1194m4keh/*http://us.toolbar.yahoo.com/?.cpdl=grpj
        12. http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJkNmttdXFoBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxMzE3NjU3NDk3
        13. mailto:dogme-traditional@yahoogroups.com?subject=Change%20Delivery%20Format:%20Traditional
        14. mailto:dogme-digest@yahoogroups.com?subject=Email%20Delivery:%20Digest
        15. mailto:dogme-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe
        16. http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        --
        Mark Johnstone

        Alfaisal University Preparatory Program
        Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
        upp.edu.sa



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Rob Haines
        Hi Mark, I appreciate your reply. My students would love to have laptops, but until our grant budget increases we ll have to settle for access in the computer
        Message 3 of 8 , Oct 3, 2011
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          Hi Mark,

          I appreciate your reply. My students would love to have laptops, but until
          our grant budget increases we'll have to settle for access in the computer
          labs on campus or in their host families, where 'screen time' is often
          limited. Some students do save up to purchase an inexpensive laptop during
          the latter part of their studies here though.

          I've seen wallwisher and schmoop is interesting, especially the Mythology
          section. The challenge, for me, is to use these sites in a dogmetic way. I
          have managed to get rid of the little boxes so that now students sit in
          rows.

          Thanks for the local (Portland, Oregon) band reference. :-)

          Rob


          On Mon, Oct 3, 2011 at 9:29 AM, <mcjsa@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Hi Rob,
          >
          > Thanks for your interesting description of your use of
          > information technology in your dogme class.
          >
          > I've been using these tools for quite some time now, including
          > Jing. I think it's easy to become distracted with the technology.
          > My students are 18 to 20 year old men. They are all "digital
          > natives" which means that all I need to do is say bring a laptop
          > to class and my class is completely equipped the next day for
          > whatever I want to do (we have wireless Internet throughout our
          > facility).
          >
          > I don't think that the technology gets in the way at all. It is
          > just a tool, like a pen and paper sometimes literally: have a
          > look at wallwisher - http://www.wallwisher.com/ this can be used
          > to support face to face interaction in really interesting ways,
          > and there's lots more like that.
          >
          > I'm teaching composition to advanced EFL/ESL students (some are
          > actually native speakers). Today I was using www.schmmop.com
          > essay writer bot with them in class. How do you collaboratively
          > write a "five paragraph essay" or any other EFL monstrosity?
          > Essay bots can structure lots of chaotic input for you, letting
          > you focus on ideas wile it does the organization.
          >
          > There are lots of ways to use technology in class and
          > fortunately, I don't have to sit students in little boxes, all in
          > a row, to use computers. My students lie scattered in little
          > groups and piles, all over the floor with their laptops as I
          > tiptoe around among them, watching what they're doing.
          >
          > Show them in the lab amd have some fun.
          >
          > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mFUHgDo4-Lg
          >
          > Mark
          >
          > On Monday, October 03, 2011 8:58 AM, "Robert Haines"
          >
          > <hainesrm@...> wrote:
          >
          > It's 8 am, Monday morning. I'll leave in an hour to begin the
          > second
          > week of fall term. As the heat and light of summer fade, rain
          > sets in
          > here in the Pacific Northwest though it's still warm enough for
          > beans
          > to sprout in the garden and crocuses to bloom. Fresh berries are
          > still
          > abundant.
          > The first week was a good start to the term. The struggle, for
          > me, has
          > been adjusting to the new schedule, especially Monday in the
          > computer
          > lab, where students sit in narrow cubes at computers with me at
          > the
          > front of the room. Last week (first week), I demonstrated how to
          > use
          > some ELT websites such as [1]http://www.elllo.org/ In general,
          >
          > I've tried
          > to incorporate what some might call a Dogme 2.0 approach into the
          > curriculum this year, beginning in the summer when we had four
          > hours a
          > day in a multi-media room, which means a computer at the front
          > with
          > DVD player, stereo, and a projector. There was also a visual
          > presenter
          > (high-tech OHP) in the room. This term I've started paying more
          > attention to Russel Stannard's bevy of screencasts at
          > [2]http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/
          >
          > in order to educate myself about web tools that might enhance my
          > teaching and students' learning. One application, with which I
          > was
          > already familiar, is Jing [3]http://www.techsmith.com/jing/ I've
          >
          > used it
          > for feedback on student writing. As with any of the tools I've
          > discovered, Jing takes a bit of practice if you want to use it
          > effectively. I wonder how many of my colleagues around the world
          > have
          > time to fiddle with these tools and think about how to use them
          > in
          > class. Will the same assumptions that many teachers tap into in
          > order
          > to use textbooks someday apply to digital media, so that an app
          > becomes second nature to the average ELT-er? We're certainly not
          > there
          > yet. Do we want to be?
          > It's too early for me to have a strong impression of what the
          > students
          > I work with think about my "Dogmedtech approach". So far, they
          > seem to
          > enjoy the Dogme part of it. As for the edtech, using computers is
          > still relatively new to some students, especially if they use
          > them for
          > anything other than a PowerPoint presentation, email, or
          > FaceBook.
          > Part of my goal is to help the students surf the Web safely,
          > finding
          > the resources they need to learn English and find reference
          > materials
          > for their upcoming coursework in their Environmental Technology
          > curriculum as some students just start clicking links (often ads)
          > and
          > entering personal information here and there. For some, it's the
          > interaction between human and computer to which they must adjust:
          > sitting at a screen, using a mouse to navigate, and having so
          > much
          > information in front of them.
          > So far, I have the impression that our face-to-face dogmetic
          > classes,
          > in groups of nine to ten, are most fruitful for us all; however,
          > I am
          > intent on enhancing these sessions through the use of edtech
          > tools. I
          > am cautious in this endeavor, because I think there's a sort of
          > tipping point at which the tech becomes the dominant factor for
          > learners and teacher, the human element falls by the wayside.
          > Just as
          > long-term smartphone users sometimes sense a phantom vibration -
          > so
          > I've heard and read - too much of the virtual world can cast a
          > glaze
          > over meaningful human interaction crafted through our inherent
          > media
          > tools (ie, our natural senses). I want to sustain the brightness
          > and
          > animation of our face-to-face interaction.
          > Ha - look at the time!
          > Any suggestions or criticism welcome. Hope you are faring well in
          > your
          > own pedagogical pursuits.
          > Rob
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          > References
          >
          > 1. http://www.elllo.org/
          > 2. http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/
          > 3. http://www.techsmith.com/jing/
          > 4. mailto:hainesrm@...
          > ?subject=Re%3A%20Autumn%20comes%20%28Week%201%29
          > 5. mailto:dogme@yahoogroups.com
          > ?subject=Re%3A%20Autumn%20comes%20%28Week%201%29
          > 6.
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJxdGZndnRmBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BG1zZ0lkAzE2NTY5BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3JwbHkEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5Nw--?act=reply&messageNum=16569
          > 7.
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/post;_ylc=X3oDMTJldjZrNWwyBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA250cGMEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5Nw--
          > 8.
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/message/16569;_ylc=X3oDMTM2aTYycmViBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BG1zZ0lkAzE2NTY5BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA3Z0cGMEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5NwR0cGNJZAMxNjU2OQ--
          > 9.
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme/members;_ylc=X3oDMTJmOGliaW1qBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZtYnJzBHN0aW1lAzEzMTc2NTc0OTc-?o=6
          > 10.
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dogme;_ylc=X3oDMTJlcTA1cDVkBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwN2dGwEc2xrA3ZnaHAEc3RpbWUDMTMxNzY1NzQ5Nw--
          > 11.
          > http://global.ard.yahoo.com/SIG=15oflvpmv/M=493064.14543979.14562481.13298430/D=groups/S=1705043336:MKP1/Y=YAHOO/EXP=1317664697/L=826f4430-edd8-11e0-921f-63297ee28446/B=oX7sA0PDhFQ-/J=1317657497793489/K=ZQjYrS_1oiquWkkfcFy04w/A=6060255/R=0/SIG=1194m4keh/*http://us.toolbar.yahoo.com/?.cpdl=grpj
          > 12.
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/;_ylc=X3oDMTJkNmttdXFoBF9TAzk3MzU5NzE0BGdycElkAzE2NTM2NzIEZ3Jwc3BJZAMxNzA1MDQzMzM2BHNlYwNmdHIEc2xrA2dmcARzdGltZQMxMzE3NjU3NDk3
          > 13. mailto:dogme-traditional@yahoogroups.com
          > ?subject=Change%20Delivery%20Format:%20Traditional
          > 14. mailto:dogme-digest@yahoogroups.com?subject=Email%20Delivery:%20Digest
          > 15. mailto:dogme-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe
          > 16. http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          > --
          > Mark Johnstone
          >
          > Alfaisal University Preparatory Program
          > Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
          > upp.edu.sa
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Kelly
          Hi, Rob, I teach a multi-level class of ten students who are anything but digital natives, as my class if for those over 60. They are all newcomers to Canada.
          Message 4 of 8 , Oct 4, 2011
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            Hi, Rob,

            I teach a multi-level class of ten students who are anything but digital natives, as my class if for those over 60. They are all newcomers to Canada.

            After the class voted (overwhelmingly) in favour of a weekly computer lab day, I began taking them. They wanted to learn to open email accounts, use FB and send photos to family. One gentleman is still learning to use a mouse, and another cannot type due to disability.

            What I do is put a bunch of links on my blog the night before so that during lab hour, they are self-sufficient and can decide for themselves which resources they wish to use.

            For learning to use a mouse, I provided a link to MouseMaster (http://www.tcet.com/eaonline/MouseMaster/index.html).

            Today was a wonderful example of how well this buffet approach is working. Three students were practicing spelling using a word list I had pre-loaded into SpellingCity.com. A fourth student had finished reading up on Thanksgiving and had moved on to reading about elections in Canada. He was copying new vocabulary into his notebook. A fifth student had finished spelling practice and had stumbled onto a link on my sidebar to a YouTube video of "The Vowel Song." The sixth student was watching news from his homeland via Voice of America special English. The student who cannot type or use the mouse was watching a long video on how to cook a turkey. One student was doing an interactive word search for Thanksgiving vocabulary.

            I don't know what this has to do with dogme except that the students direct their own activities and set their own pace. I just try to put lots of resources at their disposal and come to their aid when they call me.

            Slowly they are all becoming computer literate, which was their goal.

            Kelly Morrissey, LINC (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada) Teacher




            > > On Monday, October 03, 2011 8:58 AM, "Robert Haines"
            > >
            > > <hainesrm@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > It's 8 am, Monday morning. I'll leave in an hour to begin the
            > > second
            > > week of fall term. As the heat and light of summer fade, rain
            > > sets in
            > > here in the Pacific Northwest though it's still warm enough for
            > > beans
            > > to sprout in the garden and crocuses to bloom. Fresh berries are
            > > still
            > > abundant.
            > > The first week was a good start to the term. The struggle, for
            > > me, has
            > > been adjusting to the new schedule, especially Monday in the
            > > computer
            > > lab, where students sit in narrow cubes at computers with me at
            > > the
            > > front of the room. Last week (first week), I demonstrated how to
            > > use
            > > some ELT websites such as [1]http://www.elllo.org/ In general,
            > >
            > > I've tried
            > > to incorporate what some might call a Dogme 2.0 approach into the
            > > curriculum this year, beginning in the summer when we had four
            > > hours a
            > > day in a multi-media room, which means a computer at the front
            > > with
            > > DVD player, stereo, and a projector. There was also a visual
            > > presenter
            > > (high-tech OHP) in the room. This term I've started paying more
            > > attention to Russel Stannard's bevy of screencasts at
            > > [2]http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/
            > >
            > > in order to educate myself about web tools that might enhance my
            > > teaching and students' learning. One application, with which I
            > > was
            > > already familiar, is Jing [3]http://www.techsmith.com/jing/ I've
            > >
            > > used it
            > > for feedback on student writing. As with any of the tools I've
            > > discovered, Jing takes a bit of practice if you want to use it
            > > effectively. I wonder how many of my colleagues around the world
            > > have
            > > time to fiddle with these tools and think about how to use them
            > > in
            > > class. Will the same assumptions that many teachers tap into in
            > > order
            > > to use textbooks someday apply to digital media, so that an app
            > > becomes second nature to the average ELT-er? We're certainly not
            > > there
            > > yet. Do we want to be?
            > > It's too early for me to have a strong impression of what the
            > > students
            > > I work with think about my "Dogmedtech approach". So far, they
            > > seem to
            > > enjoy the Dogme part of it. As for the edtech, using computers is
            > > still relatively new to some students, especially if they use
            > > them for
            > > anything other than a PowerPoint presentation, email, or
            > > FaceBook.
            > > Part of my goal is to help the students surf the Web safely,
            > > finding
            > > the resources they need to learn English and find reference
            > > materials
            > > for their upcoming coursework in their Environmental Technology
            > > curriculum as some students just start clicking links (often ads)
            > > and
            > > entering personal information here and there. For some, it's the
            > > interaction between human and computer to which they must adjust:
            > > sitting at a screen, using a mouse to navigate, and having so
            > > much
            > > information in front of them.
            > > So far, I have the impression that our face-to-face dogmetic
            > > classes,
            > > in groups of nine to ten, are most fruitful for us all; however,
            > > I am
            > > intent on enhancing these sessions through the use of edtech
            > > tools. I
            > > am cautious in this endeavor, because I think there's a sort of
            > > tipping point at which the tech becomes the dominant factor for
            > > learners and teacher, the human element falls by the wayside.
            > > Just as
            > > long-term smartphone users sometimes sense a phantom vibration -
            > > so
            > > I've heard and read - too much of the virtual world can cast a
            > > glaze
            > > over meaningful human interaction crafted through our inherent
            > > media
            > > tools (ie, our natural senses). I want to sustain the brightness
            > > and
            > > animation of our face-to-face interaction.
            > > Ha - look at the time!
            > > Any suggestions or criticism welcome. Hope you are faring well in
            > > your
            > > own pedagogical pursuits.
            > > Rob

            >
          • Luke Meddings
            Hi Kelly This has echoes of Sugata Mitra s hole in the wall experiment http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/Beginnings.html , which I ve seen Scott speak about as
            Message 5 of 8 , Oct 5, 2011
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              Hi Kelly

              This has echoes of Sugata Mitra's hole in the wall experiment
              http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/Beginnings.html , which I've seen Scott
              speak about as part of his 'Six Big Ideas (and One Little One)' talk.

              I don't know if adults self-direct in quite the same way as children (I mean
              'I don't know', it's not a remote way of saying 'I don't think'!), and as
              with SLA vs first language acquisition there are bound to be cognitive and
              behavioural differences and questions that arise from those differences. But
              the principle (as you demonstrate with a class of 60+ year-olds) is the same
              - create the conditions for learning, step aside, attend, support and
              suggest where needed. Or as you put it Kelly, 'I just try to put lots of
              resources at their disposal and come to their aid when they call me.'

              So when you say 'I don't know what this has to do with dogme except that the
              students direct their own activities and set their own pace' - I think you
              answer your own question :)

              The more I think about it, the more I see dogme as a pedagogy in which
              agency can be transferred from external sources (syllabus, coursebook) to
              the teacher, and then from the teacher to the learners - with the teacher
              mediating both of these 'transfers', neither of which is immediate or
              absolute. It's part of the dynamic of a dogme class: how much can we do for
              ourselves?

              Luke




              On Wed, Oct 5, 2011 at 3:32 AM, Kelly <kelly.morrissey@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > Hi, Rob,
              >
              > I teach a multi-level class of ten students who are anything but digital
              > natives, as my class if for those over 60. They are all newcomers to Canada.
              >
              > After the class voted (overwhelmingly) in favour of a weekly computer lab
              > day, I began taking them. They wanted to learn to open email accounts, use
              > FB and send photos to family. One gentleman is still learning to use a
              > mouse, and another cannot type due to disability.
              >
              > What I do is put a bunch of links on my blog the night before so that
              > during lab hour, they are self-sufficient and can decide for themselves
              > which resources they wish to use.
              >
              > For learning to use a mouse, I provided a link to MouseMaster (
              > http://www.tcet.com/eaonline/MouseMaster/index.html).
              >
              > Today was a wonderful example of how well this buffet approach is working.
              > Three students were practicing spelling using a word list I had pre-loaded
              > into SpellingCity.com. A fourth student had finished reading up on
              > Thanksgiving and had moved on to reading about elections in Canada. He was
              > copying new vocabulary into his notebook. A fifth student had finished
              > spelling practice and had stumbled onto a link on my sidebar to a YouTube
              > video of "The Vowel Song." The sixth student was watching news from his
              > homeland via Voice of America special English. The student who cannot type
              > or use the mouse was watching a long video on how to cook a turkey. One
              > student was doing an interactive word search for Thanksgiving vocabulary.
              >
              > I don't know what this has to do with dogme except that the students direct
              > their own activities and set their own pace. I just try to put lots of
              > resources at their disposal and come to their aid when they call me.
              >
              > Slowly they are all becoming computer literate, which was their goal.
              >
              > Kelly Morrissey, LINC (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada)
              > Teacher
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Robert Haines
              Hi Kelly, Thank you for the reply and your wonderful description of newcomers to Canada becoming computer literate. I really like the Newcomers to Canada
              Message 6 of 8 , Oct 5, 2011
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                Hi Kelly,

                Thank you for the reply and your wonderful description of newcomers to
                Canada becoming computer literate. I really like the Newcomers to
                Canada moniker much more than ESL, ENNL, etc. --- sounds more inviting
                to me!

                I've used some of the resources you mention, and this week I set the
                groups out on two sites: The first was http://todaysmeet.com where
                everyone chatted for a while; the second was http://www.freetypinggame.net/play.asp
                where students could practice typing. It went over well. I printed
                out the chat, and we used it in the afternoon sessions. The chats were
                long (7 pages for one group and about 14 for the other, as I recall),
                but the students really dug deeply into their chat text. This
                surprised me because the groups were very tired that day. I
                experimented by asking the first group, 'weaker' students, to form
                groups of three and read through the chat, looking for anything they
                would like to change in order to make the messages easier to read.
                They did this with great enthusiasm and interest. Next, I asked them
                to find threads in the list of messages (the messages are simply a
                list in chronological order), which they also found exciting. We
                followed up with a conversation about the changes they'd made. To
                round it all off, we did an activity I've used before with great
                success, a back-to-back chat I gleaned from one of Scott's books
                (sorry I can't remember which one right now) whereby two people sit
                with their backs to one another and pass a piece of paper back and
                forth with messages on it. One girl said she used to do this in class
                in her country. I was surprised that she'd done this activity before.
                "Was it English class?" "No, the teacher didn't know about it", she
                answered. Ha- she meant passing notes during class!

                With the second group, I first asked them to look for threads then
                make changes afterwards. This didn't work as well as the other way
                round, which I should've known. Still - and this group was really
                exhausted - the levels of enthusiasm and interest were high. These
                were, after all, their words, their chat, and their memories. Again,
                we followed up with the 'human chat' as one student called it.

                I hope you'll keep sharing your class notes with us, Kelly. It sounds
                like you've got a good thing going there.

                Rob


                On Oct 4, 2011, at 7:32 PM, Kelly wrote:

                > Hi, Rob,
                >
                > I teach a multi-level class of ten students who are anything but
                > digital natives, as my class if for those over 60. They are all
                > newcomers to Canada.
                >
                > After the class voted (overwhelmingly) in favour of a weekly
                > computer lab day, I began taking them. They wanted to learn to open
                > email accounts, use FB and send photos to family. One gentleman is
                > still learning to use a mouse, and another cannot type due to
                > disability.
                >
                > What I do is put a bunch of links on my blog the night before so
                > that during lab hour, they are self-sufficient and can decide for
                > themselves which resources they wish to use.
                >
                > For learning to use a mouse, I provided a link to MouseMaster (http://www.tcet.com/eaonline/MouseMaster/index.html
                > ).
                >
                > Today was a wonderful example of how well this buffet approach is
                > working. Three students were practicing spelling using a word list I
                > had pre-loaded into SpellingCity.com. A fourth student had finished
                > reading up on Thanksgiving and had moved on to reading about
                > elections in Canada. He was copying new vocabulary into his
                > notebook. A fifth student had finished spelling practice and had
                > stumbled onto a link on my sidebar to a YouTube video of "The Vowel
                > Song." The sixth student was watching news from his homeland via
                > Voice of America special English. The student who cannot type or use
                > the mouse was watching a long video on how to cook a turkey. One
                > student was doing an interactive word search for Thanksgiving
                > vocabulary.
                >
                > I don't know what this has to do with dogme except that the students
                > direct their own activities and set their own pace. I just try to
                > put lots of resources at their disposal and come to their aid when
                > they call me.
                >
                > Slowly they are all becoming computer literate, which was their goal.
                >
                > Kelly Morrissey, LINC (Language Instruction for Newcomers to Canada)
                > Teacher
                >
                > > > On Monday, October 03, 2011 8:58 AM, "Robert Haines"
                > > >
                > > > <hainesrm@...> wrote:
                > > >
                > > > It's 8 am, Monday morning. I'll leave in an hour to begin the
                > > > second
                > > > week of fall term. As the heat and light of summer fade, rain
                > > > sets in
                > > > here in the Pacific Northwest though it's still warm enough for
                > > > beans
                > > > to sprout in the garden and crocuses to bloom. Fresh berries are
                > > > still
                > > > abundant.
                > > > The first week was a good start to the term. The struggle, for
                > > > me, has
                > > > been adjusting to the new schedule, especially Monday in the
                > > > computer
                > > > lab, where students sit in narrow cubes at computers with me at
                > > > the
                > > > front of the room. Last week (first week), I demonstrated how to
                > > > use
                > > > some ELT websites such as [1]http://www.elllo.org/ In general,
                > > >
                > > > I've tried
                > > > to incorporate what some might call a Dogme 2.0 approach into the
                > > > curriculum this year, beginning in the summer when we had four
                > > > hours a
                > > > day in a multi-media room, which means a computer at the front
                > > > with
                > > > DVD player, stereo, and a projector. There was also a visual
                > > > presenter
                > > > (high-tech OHP) in the room. This term I've started paying more
                > > > attention to Russel Stannard's bevy of screencasts at
                > > > [2]http://www.teachertrainingvideos.com/
                > > >
                > > > in order to educate myself about web tools that might enhance my
                > > > teaching and students' learning. One application, with which I
                > > > was
                > > > already familiar, is Jing [3]http://www.techsmith.com/jing/ I've
                > > >
                > > > used it
                > > > for feedback on student writing. As with any of the tools I've
                > > > discovered, Jing takes a bit of practice if you want to use it
                > > > effectively. I wonder how many of my colleagues around the world
                > > > have
                > > > time to fiddle with these tools and think about how to use them
                > > > in
                > > > class. Will the same assumptions that many teachers tap into in
                > > > order
                > > > to use textbooks someday apply to digital media, so that an app
                > > > becomes second nature to the average ELT-er? We're certainly not
                > > > there
                > > > yet. Do we want to be?
                > > > It's too early for me to have a strong impression of what the
                > > > students
                > > > I work with think about my "Dogmedtech approach". So far, they
                > > > seem to
                > > > enjoy the Dogme part of it. As for the edtech, using computers is
                > > > still relatively new to some students, especially if they use
                > > > them for
                > > > anything other than a PowerPoint presentation, email, or
                > > > FaceBook.
                > > > Part of my goal is to help the students surf the Web safely,
                > > > finding
                > > > the resources they need to learn English and find reference
                > > > materials
                > > > for their upcoming coursework in their Environmental Technology
                > > > curriculum as some students just start clicking links (often ads)
                > > > and
                > > > entering personal information here and there. For some, it's the
                > > > interaction between human and computer to which they must adjust:
                > > > sitting at a screen, using a mouse to navigate, and having so
                > > > much
                > > > information in front of them.
                > > > So far, I have the impression that our face-to-face dogmetic
                > > > classes,
                > > > in groups of nine to ten, are most fruitful for us all; however,
                > > > I am
                > > > intent on enhancing these sessions through the use of edtech
                > > > tools. I
                > > > am cautious in this endeavor, because I think there's a sort of
                > > > tipping point at which the tech becomes the dominant factor for
                > > > learners and teacher, the human element falls by the wayside.
                > > > Just as
                > > > long-term smartphone users sometimes sense a phantom vibration -
                > > > so
                > > > I've heard and read - too much of the virtual world can cast a
                > > > glaze
                > > > over meaningful human interaction crafted through our inherent
                > > > media
                > > > tools (ie, our natural senses). I want to sustain the brightness
                > > > and
                > > > animation of our face-to-face interaction.
                > > > Ha - look at the time!
                > > > Any suggestions or criticism welcome. Hope you are faring well in
                > > > your
                > > > own pedagogical pursuits.
                > > > Rob
                >
                > >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Kelly
                Luke, Thank you for your response! It was a bit of a thrill for me to get a personal response from the co-author of my favourite TESL book. Yes, I have seen
                Message 7 of 8 , Oct 9, 2011
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                  Luke,

                  Thank you for your response! It was a bit of a thrill for me to get a personal response from the co-author of my favourite TESL book.

                  Yes, I have seen the "hole in the wall" experiments on TED Talks. Neat, eh?

                  Kelly

                  --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, Luke Meddings <lukemeddings@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Kelly
                  >
                  > This has echoes of Sugata Mitra's hole in the wall experiment
                  > http://www.hole-in-the-wall.com/Beginnings.html , which I've seen Scott
                  > speak about as part of his 'Six Big Ideas (and One Little One)' talk.
                  >
                  > I don't know if adults self-direct in quite the same way as children (I mean
                  > 'I don't know', it's not a remote way of saying 'I don't think'!), and as
                  > with SLA vs first language acquisition there are bound to be cognitive and
                  > behavioural differences and questions that arise from those differences. But
                  > the principle (as you demonstrate with a class of 60+ year-olds) is the same
                  > - create the conditions for learning, step aside, attend, support and
                  > suggest where needed. Or as you put it Kelly, 'I just try to put lots of
                  > resources at their disposal and come to their aid when they call me.'
                  >
                  > So when you say 'I don't know what this has to do with dogme except that the
                  > students direct their own activities and set their own pace' - I think you
                  > answer your own question :)
                  >
                  > The more I think about it, the more I see dogme as a pedagogy in which
                  > agency can be transferred from external sources (syllabus, coursebook) to
                  > the teacher, and then from the teacher to the learners - with the teacher
                  > mediating both of these 'transfers', neither of which is immediate or
                  > absolute. It's part of the dynamic of a dogme class: how much can we do for
                  > ourselves?
                  >
                  > Luke
                • Kelly
                  Rob, Thank you for such a warm welcome to the group. Not all TESL discussion groups are so cordial. ;) I can t wait to use todaysmeet with the advanced class
                  Message 8 of 8 , Oct 9, 2011
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                    Rob,

                    Thank you for such a warm welcome to the group. Not all TESL discussion groups are so cordial. ;)

                    I can't wait to use todaysmeet with the advanced class that I occasionally cover when their instructor is sick. I tried it out and WOW, is it ever user-friendly. I think it will be a hit.

                    Cheers!

                    Kelly

                    --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, Robert Haines <hainesrm@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Hi Kelly,
                    >
                    > Thank you for the reply and your wonderful description of newcomers to
                    > Canada becoming computer literate. I really like the Newcomers to
                    > Canada moniker much more than ESL, ENNL, etc. --- sounds more inviting
                    > to me!
                    >
                    > I've used some of the resources you mention, and this week I set the
                    > groups out on two sites: The first was http://todaysmeet.com where
                    > everyone chatted for a while; the second was http://www.freetypinggame.net/play.asp
                    > where students could practice typing. It went over well. I printed
                    > out the chat, and we used it in the afternoon sessions. The chats were
                    > long (7 pages for one group and about 14 for the other, as I recall),
                    > but the students really dug deeply into their chat text. This
                    > surprised me because the groups were very tired that day. I
                    > experimented by asking the first group, 'weaker' students, to form
                    > groups of three and read through the chat, looking for anything they
                    > would like to change in order to make the messages easier to read.
                    > They did this with great enthusiasm and interest. Next, I asked them
                    > to find threads in the list of messages (the messages are simply a
                    > list in chronological order), which they also found exciting. We
                    > followed up with a conversation about the changes they'd made. To
                    > round it all off, we did an activity I've used before with great
                    > success, a back-to-back chat I gleaned from one of Scott's books
                    > (sorry I can't remember which one right now) whereby two people sit
                    > with their backs to one another and pass a piece of paper back and
                    > forth with messages on it. One girl said she used to do this in class
                    > in her country. I was surprised that she'd done this activity before.
                    > "Was it English class?" "No, the teacher didn't know about it", she
                    > answered. Ha- she meant passing notes during class!
                    >
                    > With the second group, I first asked them to look for threads then
                    > make changes afterwards. This didn't work as well as the other way
                    > round, which I should've known. Still - and this group was really
                    > exhausted - the levels of enthusiasm and interest were high. These
                    > were, after all, their words, their chat, and their memories. Again,
                    > we followed up with the 'human chat' as one student called it.
                    >
                    > I hope you'll keep sharing your class notes with us, Kelly. It sounds
                    > like you've got a good thing going there.
                    >
                    > Rob
                    >
                    >
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