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The future of Dogme

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  • Peter
    Hi everyone, For those of you who were/are at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, I hope you had/are having a good time. Unfortunately, I haven t been able to
    Message 1 of 48 , Apr 10 3:12 PM
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      Hi everyone,

      For those of you who were/are at the IATEFL conference in Harrogate, I hope you had/are having a good time.

      Unfortunately, I haven't been able to attend but have spent a lot of time following the excellent coverage on IATEFL online. http://iatefl.britishcouncil.org/2010/

      In Scott's interview, I sent in a question asking him where he thought Dogme would be in another 10 years time and also whether he thought Dogme would ever become mainstream in ELT. (For me, it still seems to be a fringe movement although I think it's acceptance is growing more and more).

      http://iatefl.britishcouncil.org/2010/sessions/2010-04-09/interview-scott-thornbury

      Unfortunately, they only asked the first half of the question, so I thought I'd throw the second half of the question open to the group. I personally feel that Dogme (and the ideas associated with it) can only ever become mainstream if it is addressed in initial teacher training courses.

      That's why it was really heartening to hear more about what Anthony and Izzy are doing on their CELTA courses in their school in Hamburg. For those like me, who weren't able to see it live in Harrogate, I thoroughly recommend watching a video of the session on the IATEFL website.

      http://iatefl.britishcouncil.org/2010/sessions/2010-04-08/teacher-training-unplugged-simplifying-initial-language-teacher-education-anthon

      So, can the ideas related to Dogme ever become mainstream? If so, what needs to change in order for this to happen?

      Peter
    • literacyacrosscultures
      ... Perhaps what I said is an overstatement, because careers in TEFL are often quite different than teaching careers in stable systems. First, there is the
      Message 48 of 48 , Apr 16 2:32 AM
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        > > What counts the most is the period of induction, the first one or
        > > two years, and then each teacher's path in their own development.
        > >
        > I don't (yet) know if I agree with you here, but I'll think about it!
        >
        >
        > I think that
        > although the first year or three (and I say three, because a lot of people seem to stay in TEFL for three years, though not in mainstream teaching)are crucial to forming a teacher 'with experience', the key period both in my own personal case, and as I've observed with trainees, is the point of dissatisfaction, which can come at any time.

        Perhaps what I said is an overstatement, because careers in TEFL are often quite different than teaching careers in stable systems. First, there is the element of having to adapt to life overseas, which can at times feel quite neurotic, even psychotic. Second, EFL teachers placed in systems like Japan, Korea, Taiwan etc (perhaps a lot of Europe too) are not really being hired there to fit in like the local teachers.

        But since so many do quit after a couple years, some happy with the experience, others bitter. that does say something about the profundity of such experiences. As Talk, Talk sang, IT'S MY LIFE.

        Charles Jannuzi
        Univ. of Fukui, Japan
        http://www.eltinjapan.com
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