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Is Rob inj Nirvana and should I be evicted?

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  • Dennis Newson
    I ve been wanting to contribute to the Rob in Nirvana ? thread for some time but have spent very many hours recently creating a so-called Dogme Gardens in
    Message 1 of 2 , Jul 4, 2009
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      I've been wanting to contribute to the "Rob in Nirvana ?" thread for
      some time but have spent very many hours recently creating a so-called
      "Dogme Gardens" in Second Life. More of that in another post.

      Rob, with tongue in cheek, after an account of recent facilitation in
      his class, wondered aloud if he is still teaching a la Dogme. Surely
      the answer to that is: if the classes are effective and enjoyable,
      does it matter whether it is Dogme or not? (My impression, Rob, from
      your , 'accounts, is that third party categorizers would put you down
      as 'learner independence' , 'autonomous learning or even 'classroom
      management'.)

      Scott's beautifully succinct reply to '"What are the core principles of Dogme?".
      is:


      1. conversation driven
      2. materials light

      and where 3. there is a focus on emergent language.

      In terms of my own practice over the years it is 3 that concerns me.
      It worries me because I wonder if I have become reductionist. To
      simplify to make the point ,I have really taken the view that learning
      is a mysterious process that I can do nothing to influence directly. I
      can ( and did, do) provide affordances , scaffold, facilitate,
      motivate (if I can), base all that I do/did on conversation. abhor
      textbooks but I did/do less and less direct "language work" including
      'noticing' and 'points arising' - examination, treatment of language
      that has arisen during the session. I arrange, present, manipulate
      language, exchanges for my learners - and leave the rest to them.

      Have I gone too far? Should the authorities consider evicting me from
      the Dogme Party for apostasy?


      Dennis

      --
      Dennis Newson, retired,
      Formerly: University of Osnabrück.
      Webhead, member of SLexperiments.
      Moderator OWL and YLTSIG lists,
      Member of IATEFL YLTSIG committee.
      Resident of Second Life.
      Founder of a number of TEFL lists.
      http://www.dennisnewson.de
    • Robert Horne
      Dogme was a salutary corrective to the grammar-ridden, little-bits-of-cut-up-paper infested reaches of efl a few years ago. It harked back to a never
      Message 2 of 2 , Jul 5, 2009
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        Dogme was a salutary corrective to the grammar-ridden, little-bits-of-cut-up-paper infested reaches of efl a few years ago. It harked 'back' to a never existent moment of purity - of people in a room speaking English with a facilitator aiding emergent language to be knocked into shape by the participants. It relied solely on what was already in place in the given room - ie, it was not staged but arose from the situation.
        As such it could probably never be more than an ideal, but I thought it was extraordinarily liberating, mainly because it helped formulate all my suspicions of tefltasticness and confirm me that my own approaches were at least honourable. It does not mean 'materials light' teaching - that is another and quite separate strand of teaching. It does not mean forcing contexts, setting up 'students bring in ...' preconceived situations. It is about unique situations which arise in real time; a 'dogme' lesson would by its nature be unrepeatable. It places deep responsibilities on both facilitator and students and I honestly doubt if many teachers would have the time, will or energy to follow the method in its pure form. But that is how it emerged - a method which sought to create situations rather than following prefigured constructs.
        Otherwise it is just a way of carrying on doing the normal tefltastic grind but with fewer bits of cut-up paper

        --- On Sun, 5/7/09, Dennis Newson <djn@...> wrote:


        From: Dennis Newson <djn@...>
        Subject: [dogme] Is Rob inj Nirvana and should I be evicted?
        To: dogme@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, 5 July, 2009, 6:53 AM








        I've been wanting to contribute to the "Rob in Nirvana ?" thread for
        some time but have spent very many hours recently creating a so-called
        "Dogme Gardens" in Second Life. More of that in another post.

        Rob, with tongue in cheek, after an account of recent facilitation in
        his class, wondered aloud if he is still teaching a la Dogme. Surely
        the answer to that is: if the classes are effective and enjoyable,
        does it matter whether it is Dogme or not? (My impression, Rob, from
        your , 'accounts, is that third party categorizers would put you down
        as 'learner independence' , 'autonomous learning or even 'classroom
        management'. )

        Scott's beautifully succinct reply to '"What are the core principles of Dogme?".
        is:

        1. conversation driven
        2. materials light

        and where 3. there is a focus on emergent language.

        In terms of my own practice over the years it is 3 that concerns me.
        It worries me because I wonder if I have become reductionist. To
        simplify to make the point ,I have really taken the view that learning
        is a mysterious process that I can do nothing to influence directly. I
        can ( and did, do) provide affordances , scaffold, facilitate,
        motivate (if I can), base all that I do/did on conversation. abhor
        textbooks but I did/do less and less direct "language work" including
        'noticing' and 'points arising' - examination, treatment of language
        that has arisen during the session. I arrange, present, manipulate
        language, exchanges for my learners - and leave the rest to them.

        Have I gone too far? Should the authorities consider evicting me from
        the Dogme Party for apostasy?

        Dennis

        --
        Dennis Newson, retired,
        Formerly: University of Osnabrück.
        Webhead, member of SLexperiments.
        Moderator OWL and YLTSIG lists,
        Member of IATEFL YLTSIG committee.
        Resident of Second Life.
        Founder of a number of TEFL lists.
        http://www.dennisne wson.de


















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