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Re: [dogme] Re: Google Wave and Dogme

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  • Dennis Newson
    A second take on this is that it raises, for me at least, the old basic question: HOW do people learn languages - from what gamut of ways? H*ow do learners
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 1, 2009
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      A second take on this is that it raises, for me at least, the old basic
      question: HOW do people learn languages - from what gamut of ways? H*ow do
      learners remember and more or less accurately use what they have learned?
      Will the Google Wave provide some answers?
      Frankly, I'm more than a little on guard about my writing being cooperative.
      The thought of Scott and Rob, treasure them as I do, modifying my messages
      before the list and the world see them is not appealing. Or am I
      misunderstanding?

      Dennis*


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Howard Vickers
      Hi Dennis I think you raise a really key point about whether authorship is clear if comments can be edited. The video shows that Wave attempts to make this
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 1, 2009
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        Hi Dennis

        I think you raise a really key point about whether authorship is clear
        if comments can be edited. The video shows that Wave attempts to make
        this explicit through highlighting changes the first time they are seen
        by another user and then making the sequence of edits continuously
        available to view using the playback function. I'm not so sure this is
        enough for some cases.

        Obviously the example presented in the video is of a business report
        where authorship is less an issue. However for language learners there
        may well be a need for individuals to feel a greater sense of their
        participation. I am wondering whether there needs to be another way for
        students to gain recognition for their individual efforts. Blogs are
        very much about an individual's writings – but Wave is based more on
        wikis, which only offer acknowledgment of each author's contribution
        within the history page of the document. Wave changes the interface,
        but essentially "playback" is the history tab in a conventional
        wiki.

        Your other point about how we learn is then related in my view, because
        motivation must surely be partly gained through recognition – and
        yet collaborative work seems to reduce opportunities for this personal
        acknowledgment of achievement.

        My experience of using wikis is for students to either create new pages
        in Wikipedia (or similar wikis) or to add substantial text to existing
        pages. Their contribution is fairly clear to see. However these are
        students receiving one-to-one classes and so although their work becomes
        merged into the general flow of a Wikipedia page, there is an initial
        period where their work remains distinct.

        I would be interested in hearing from those who have used wikis in group
        lessons as to whether recognition is an issue.

        Best wishes

        Howard







        --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Newson <djn@...> wrote:
        >
        > A second take on this is that it raises, for me at least, the old
        basic
        > question: HOW do people learn languages - from what gamut of ways?
        H*ow do
        > learners remember and more or less accurately use what they have
        learned?
        > Will the Google Wave provide some answers?
        > Frankly, I'm more than a little on guard about my writing being
        cooperative.
        > The thought of Scott and Rob, treasure them as I do, modifying my
        messages
        > before the list and the world see them is not appealing. Or am I
        > misunderstanding?
        >
        > Dennis*
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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