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Re: [dogme] Help!

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  • sean sheriff
    Hi Kathy,   How about this wacky idea?: a modified version of John s And then game.   You give the students a relatively short dictation of maybe three
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 3, 2008
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      Hi Kathy,
       
      How about this wacky idea?: a modified version of John's And then game.
       
      You give the students a relatively short dictation of maybe three sentences, and they have to continue the story/report/whatever by supplying their own sentences. Since you say they are fairly fluent, they could say the sentences out loud, and you or other classmates could try to 'fix' them before they write them down. And just keep going until you've got about a paragraph, then have a check at the end.
       
      Does that make sense or sound useful?
       
      SEAN

      --- On Fri, 9/26/08, kathy2tea <Jkmoliver@...> wrote:

      From: kathy2tea <Jkmoliver@...>
      Subject: [dogme] Help!
      To: dogme@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, September 26, 2008, 2:53 AM






      Hello everyone. I am appealing for some ideas from those
      dogmetics/dogmetist s (?) who have taught/are teaching English to
      Chinese people. I have a very good little group of reasonably high
      level speakers but they have a great deal of difficulty with the
      writing of English.

      I have read about, and understand, how Chinese works and the
      differences there are between it and English but what I am looking for
      are ideas which work and enable students to really get to grips with
      writing. Is it a matter of dictation? Classifiying words into colour
      groups and then fitting them together?

      Hope someone can give practical advice!

      Thank you all,

      Kathy


















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    • Jeff Bragg
      Just off the top of my head (and without much experience of teaching Chinese students, I might add, and little understanding of their problems in general and
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 4, 2008
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        Just off the top of my head (and without much experience of teaching Chinese students, I might add, and little understanding of their problems in general and in this particular case), I would be tempted to try something like the following:

        Firstly, why not ask them just what they want to be able to write in English? It could be anything, I suppose, from short stories to business proposals. Then divide them into their affinity groups. Next, provide them with examples of their chosen type of writing, and indulge in a spot of analysis - genre, organisation, language, etc. They could do this in their groups once you show (erm, I mean teach, of course!) them what they should be looking for.

        Then comes the hard bit - devising exercises and activities to guide them towards their chosen style of writing. These don't need to be too high-falutin' at first - maybe some gap-fill stuff, and some work on basic language and grammar items that they could do as a whole class, before tangenting out/back to their affinity groups. And then?

        Time for a break! Can anybody follow on from there?

        Jeff
         




















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      • Dennis Newson
        I ve totally null knowledge of teaching Chinese, but I used to enjoy teaching German students to write, greatly. I found a vital step one was to get them
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 4, 2008
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          I've totally null knowledge of teaching Chinese, but I used to enjoy
          teaching German students to write, greatly.

          I found a vital step one was to get them relaxed, to see that writing was
          them recounting something or expressing an opinion - emphasis on them.

          One of the first pieces writing they did was always memories from childhood
          - whatever came next . But they were always engaged with such pieces and I
          tried to keep the engagement going as we moved on to the kinds of writing
          they needed.

          After that, as Jeff suggests, I'd make the writing (Don't call them
          exercises, awful associations) be versions of what they need to write -
          reports, book reviews, assessments - whatever and all kinds of language
          stuff should be thrown up that will give you something to work on for the
          next session.

          Dennis


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        • John N. Q. Warner
          Thanks for this Dennis. I think that Germans are very reluctant to relax and speak from the personal position. I love using postcards picture stimulus and
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 4, 2008
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            Thanks for this Dennis. I think that Germans are very reluctant to relax
            and speak from the personal position.

            I love using postcards picture stimulus and there are often Germans who
            want to say this is of this or that ism but not whether they like it or
            would have it in the house. So when I model the talking about a picture
            I always make a point of not "describing" the picture in terms of the
            scene but in terms of liking this colour or that - finding it pleasant -
            and where I would hang it if I owned it.

            John N.Q. Warner

            On Sat, 2008-10-04 at 11:09 +0200, Dennis Newson wrote:
            > I found a vital step one was to get them relaxed, to see that writing
            > was
            > them recounting something or expressing an opinion - emphasis on them.
          • diarmuid_fogarty
            Kathy I labour under the misapprehension that there are four things that your students may need 1. lots of things to read; 2. lots of opportunity to write; 3.
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 8, 2008
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              Kathy
              I labour under the misapprehension that there are four things that your students may need
              1. lots of things to read;
              2. lots of opportunity to write;
              3. lots of selective feedback;
              4. lots of time.

              Probably in that order.
              Diarmuid
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