Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Particularity

Expand Messages
  • scott_thornbury
    In a recent posting Sue said: I hasten to add that any classroom happenings I write about are never intended to be anything but examples of how I see dogme
    Message 1 of 3 , Feb 1, 2002
    View Source
    • 0 Attachment
      In a recent posting Sue said: "I hasten to add that any
      classroom 'happenings' I write about are never intended to be
      anything but examples of how I see dogme type principles working in
      the reality around me; not templates or models to copy!"

      This chimes neatly with a point made by Kumaravadivelu in the latest
      TESOL Q ("Towards a postmethod pedagogy") in which he
      characterises "post method" pedagogy as being one of "particularity,
      practicality, and possibility" (PPP?). By particularity he
      means: "language pedagogy, to be relevant, must be sensitive to a
      particular group of teachers teaching a particular group of learners
      pursuing a particular set of goals within a particular institutional
      context embedded in a particular sociocultural milieu". He
      elaborates: "All pedagogy, like all politics, is local.[Discuss?] To
      ignore local exigencies is to ignore lived experiences. Pedagogies
      that ignore lived experiences will ultimately prove to be 'so
      disturbing for those affected by them - so threatening to their
      belief systems - that hositility is aroused and learning becomes
      impossible' (Coleman, 1996, p. 11)".

      This seems to be a very dogme position. For a start, it is difficult
      to see how a global coursebook squares with the notion of
      particularity.

      (The Coleman quote comes froma collection called "Society and the
      Laguage Classroom", CUP - might be worth a look at).

      More on practicality and possibility later on.

      Scott
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.