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Re: Neil Postman

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  • johnkuti
    Alastair, no I wasn t asking about pedagogical views. I was referring to the idea of the teacher as in some way favouring some specific changes in society or
    Message 1 of 7 , May 1, 2008
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      Alastair,
      no I wasn't asking about pedagogical views. I was referring to the
      idea of the teacher as in some way favouring some specific changes in
      society or international relations. Say (for example) T asks students
      what the minister of industry means when he says "we need a flexible
      workforce"...T personally has an old-fashioned socialist
      interpretation and can choose what to do:

      (a) add in T's own opinion
      or
      (b) remain neutral.

      My question is which...

      John
      (May 1st - still celebrating international workers' solidarity day)


      > John,
      > Thanks for posting the article by Neil Postman. He was a very profound
      > writer and also very humorous. There are some great touches of humour in
      > this article too.
      > If by critique you mean saying it as it is and giving your views without
      > fear of reprisals, I do not think that anybody would endeavour to
      prevent
      > students from discussing what they may have read about Postman or
      Chomsky
      > and taking sides if they agree or disagree. Such educational
      theorists are
      > surely not gods Not everybody has original views and language
      development
      > will be encouraged through discussion. The teacher should also remain
      > neutral.( Is that somewhere in Freire??)
      > > I hope that is what you meant!
      > Alastair
      > >
      > >
      >
    • diarmuid_fogarty
      ... My answer would be to do whatever came naturally. In my case (as you may have guessed), that would probably be to add my tuppenceworth (more concisely than
      Message 2 of 7 , May 1, 2008
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        --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, "johnkuti" <johnkuti@...> wrote:

        >T personally has an old-fashioned socialist
        > interpretation and can choose what to do:
        >
        > (a) add in T's own opinion
        > or
        > (b) remain neutral.
        >
        > My question is which...
        >

        My answer would be to do whatever came naturally. In my case (as you
        may have guessed), that would probably be to add my tuppenceworth
        (more concisely than I do here, I should add, and with less
        rambuctiousness). Freire most certainly did not expect his teachers
        to be neutral. Quite the opposite. His teachers went into their
        communities with clear and explicit objectives.

        However, adding one's opinion is not the same as imposing one's
        opinion, as will be obvious. The secret, then, is in how you put your
        opinion across. I usually do this by saying something similar
        to, "But some people believe that...". If I am asked explicitly for
        my opinion, I usually give it with the follow-up, "but many people
        would disagree with me and say that I am wrong." This may have a lot
        to do with the kind of opinions I entertain...

        Similarly, if there is concordance between my views and the views of
        the students, I attempt to put forward alternative views that may be
        quite contrary to what I believe. The point about being critical
        means having to deal with other ways of thinking and having to decide
        for yourself whether they are valid or not. If the alternatives are
        not present, it makes it difficult to evaluate them. If the
        alternatives are rammed down your throat, it isn't really critical
        pedagogy.

        Diarmuid
        (still /commemorating/ international workers' day, pedant that I am)
      • alastairlambert@blueyonder.co.uk
        ... Diarmuid, Thank you very much for the correction about neutrality and Freire. I was completely wrong and have got him confused with another writer. This
        Message 3 of 7 , May 1, 2008
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          > --- In dogme@yahoogroups.com, "johnkuti" <johnkuti@...> wrote:
          >
          >>T personally has an old-fashioned socialist
          >> interpretation and can choose what to do:
          >>
          >> (a) add in T's own opinion
          >> or
          >> (b) remain neutral.
          >>
          >> My question is which...
          >>
          >
          > My answer would be to do whatever came naturally. In my case (as you
          > may have guessed), that would probably be to add my tuppenceworth
          > (more concisely than I do here, I should add, and with less
          > rambuctiousness). Freire most certainly did not expect his teachers
          > to be neutral. Quite the opposite. His teachers went into their
          > communities with clear and explicit objectives.
          >
          > However, adding one's opinion is not the same as imposing one's
          > opinion, as will be obvious. The secret, then, is in how you put your
          > opinion across. I usually do this by saying something similar
          > to, "But some people believe that...". If I am asked explicitly for
          > my opinion, I usually give it with the follow-up, "but many people
          > would disagree with me and say that I am wrong." This may have a lot
          > to do with the kind of opinions I entertain...
          >
          > Similarly, if there is concordance between my views and the views of
          > the students, I attempt to put forward alternative views that may be
          > quite contrary to what I believe. The point about being critical
          > means having to deal with other ways of thinking and having to decide
          > for yourself whether they are valid or not. If the alternatives are
          > not present, it makes it difficult to evaluate them. If the
          > alternatives are rammed down your throat, it isn't really critical
          > pedagogy.
          >
          > Diarmuid
          > (still /commemorating/ international workers' day, pedant that I am)

          Diarmuid,
          Thank you very much for the correction about neutrality and Freire. I was
          completely wrong and have got him confused with another writer. This forum
          is very instructive!
          I agree with everything else you say and follow the same procedures.
          Ramming things down throats certainly doesn't work as a teaching method.
          Alastair
          >
          >
        • Robert Haines
          I offer this to those interested: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Postman Rob
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 9, 2009
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            I offer this to those interested:

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neil_Postman

            Rob
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