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Yamama cultural info?

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  • Dylan Kosma
    Hi all, Just wondering if anyone has got the cultural scoop on Yamama, one of my favorite rhythms! I ve heard that it is Susu rhythm from the coastal region of
    Message 1 of 8 , Nov 30, 2011
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      Hi all,

      Just wondering if anyone has got the cultural scoop on Yamama, one of my
      favorite rhythms! I've heard that it is Susu rhythm from the coastal
      region of Guinea. I've heard two different descriptions as to why it is
      played: 1) mask dance done with movements simulating the removal of
      chaff from grains, rice, etc. 2) A rhythm played where women get
      together to honor the spirit of "Yamama" and ask for blessings in the
      coming year (i.e. good harvest, fertility, etc.).

      any and all info will be appreciated!

      Allaniche,


      Dylan
    • bones45991@aol.com
      Hi Dylan, I really like this rhythm also! Here is some info that I found on Yamama from various resources but I m pretty sure this will lead to more confusion.
      Message 2 of 8 , Dec 2, 2011
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        Hi Dylan,
            I really like this rhythm also! Here is some info that I found on Yamama from various resources but I'm pretty sure this will lead to more confusion. The first one I posted said that Yamama is a Susu rhythm also called Mamaya but I only found that connection on one site. The other references are for just Yamama or Mamaya as seperate rhythms.

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "YAMAMA - From the Susu ethnic group, also called “Mamaya”. The women of the village get together once a year to honor the female spirit of Yamama. On this occasion they will ask her for whatever they need for the coming year."
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "Originally a mask dance from the Samou region, now played at various occasions."
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "Yamama- Powerful dance rhythm of the Mandeis ethnic group of southwestern coastal Guinea."
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "The old Mandingo-dance Mamaya (Mamayah) was very populair in Guinea during the 1940 - 1960 period. Traditionally it was a very stately dance, that was performed in a club or a group where one was part of. Dressed in gouba's and embroded shirts, male and female dancers could express their beauty, while dancing in two circles (men in outer circle, women in inner circle). Dance-steps were made in a majestic way and a handkerchief or decorated stick was used as an attribute. The rhythm started with the singing of a Griot and/or music made with the Balafon, Bolon or Tama. Mamaya is traditionally without an echauffement."
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "Mamaya : a rhythm that deals with the perils of greed and jealousy."
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
        "Mamaya- Origin, Northeast Guinea ethnic group Malinke."
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~


        So now that you are probably more confused, I hope this helps???
        Peace,
        Dan E.
        "Yamama is so ugly that she can't walk in the woods without some yelling "Bigfoot!"" Boooo, bad play on words :-p

        Dylan wrote-
        <Just wondering if anyone has got the cultural scoop on Yamama, one of my
        favorite rhythms! I've heard that it is Susu rhythm from the coastal
        region of Guinea. I've heard two different descriptions as to why it is
        played: 1) mask dance done with movements simulating the removal of
        chaff from grains, rice, etc. 2) A rhythm played where women get
        together to honor the spirit of "Yamama" and ask for blessings in the
        coming year (i.e. good harvest, fertility, etc.).

        any and all info will be appreciated!>


      • Molly Souare
        What does your Yamama sound like? I played what our Guinean teacher said was Yamama for the first time last week. The djembe accompaniments were really really
        Message 3 of 8 , Dec 2, 2011
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          What does your Yamama sound like? I played what our Guinean teacher said was Yamama for the first time last week. The djembe accompaniments were really really difficult and exhausting, I was on the duns, but I can't imagine what we were playing could possibly be a stately dance, so just wondering if it is similar to the one you are referring to? It does get so confusing!
          Cheers Molly

        • Molly Souare
          Further to my last post - Pretty sure the Mamaya is stately cos it s a slow one, I think Yamama is a different rhythm altogether and it is fast. But still not
          Message 4 of 8 , Dec 2, 2011
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            Further to my last post - Pretty sure the Mamaya is stately cos it's a slow one, I think Yamama is a different rhythm altogether and it is fast. But still not sure on origins.
            I will keep searching, I am very curious!
            Molly

          • Dylan Kosma
            Hi all, Thanks for the posts on Yamama!!! I am pretty sure that the Susu Yamama is NOT the Malinke Mamaya and they should not be confused. I originally learned
            Message 5 of 8 , Dec 4, 2011
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              Hi all,

              Thanks for the posts on Yamama!!! I am pretty sure that the Susu Yamama is NOT the Malinke Mamaya and they should not be confused. I originally learned Yamama from Michael Markus but have lost some of the detail due to my poor memory!!! doh! bad djembe student!!!

              For a good example of Yamama that I am talking about please refer to the following link: http://tinyurl.com/895c4nj. Still not sure what the purpose of Yamama is. Seems to either be an agricultural rhythm or a rhythm played to ask for blessings in the coming year.

              Amina,

              Dylan

              On 12/3/2011 12:58 AM, Molly Souare wrote:  

              Further to my last post - Pretty sure the Mamaya is stately cos it's a slow one, I think Yamama is a different rhythm altogether and it is fast. But still not sure on origins.
              I will keep searching, I am very curious!
              Molly


              -- 
              ÐÏࡱá
            • Michi Henning
              Here some info about Yamama from Fara Tolno s instructional DVD: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEPi3Unnq_g And, yes, the Susu Yamama is nothing like the
              Message 6 of 8 , Dec 4, 2011
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                Here some info about Yamama from Fara Tolno's instructional DVD:

                http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEPi3Unnq_g

                And, yes, the Susu Yamama is nothing like the Mamaya of the Malinke people. Mamaya is a circle dance from northeast Guinea with a completely different feel to Yamama, which is a mask dance. Neither Yamama nor Mamaya are agricultural rhythms. 

                Cheers,

                Michi.


                On 04.12.2011, at 19:14, Dylan Kosma wrote:

                 

                Hi all,

                Thanks for the posts on Yamama!!! I am pretty sure that the Susu Yamama is NOT the Malinke Mamaya and they should not be confused. I originally learned Yamama from Michael Markus but have lost some of the detail due to my poor memory!!! doh! bad djembe student!!!

                For a good example of Yamama that I am talking about please refer to the following link: http://tinyurl.com/895c4nj. Still not sure what the purpose of Yamama is. Seems to either be an agricultural rhythm or a rhythm played to ask for blessings in the coming year.

                Amina,

                Dylan


              • Scott Griffiths
                From the The Rhythm Reference Project by Fara Tolno http://www.rhythmreference.com Yamama comes from the Temine people. It was traditionally a masked dance,
                Message 7 of 8 , Dec 5, 2011
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                  From the "The Rhythm Reference Project" by Fara Tolno http://www.rhythmreference.com

                  Yamama comes from the Temine people.  It was traditionally a masked dance, played once a year as a ceremonial offering for better crops, prosperity and other good luck upon the village.
                    
                • Satoru NISHIMURA
                  ,Hi, Let me introduce our concert held in Kagoshima, Japan. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF7jQ6Rh5FE After the tsunami and the nuclear accidents, we are
                  Message 8 of 8 , Jan 8, 2012
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                    ,Hi,

                     

                    Let me introduce our concert held in Kagoshima, Japan.

                    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF7jQ6Rh5FE

                     

                    After the tsunami and the nuclear accidents, we are working hard to

                    come up with alternative ways of generating power.

                     

                    The djembe concert tries to show the effectiveness of Small Hydroelectric Generation.

                    All the LED lights used there were generated by a small pump set in the side of a small piece

                    of vegetable garden.

                     

                    When I travelled to a village Sigiri in Guinea, I was amazed by the wonderful concert  

                    lit by a few small halogen lights. Our concert is  inspired by it…

                     

                    Satoru

                    Kagoshima, Japan

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