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Re:: Goat skins and their possible deterioration

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  • Rachel Nguyen
    Hey R, Thanks for this! I am especially happy to hear that you reuse goatskins on smaller instruments when they break. I am extremely fond of the skin on my
    Message 1 of 28 , Jul 16, 2008
      Hey R,

      Thanks for this! I am especially happy to hear that you reuse goatskins
      on smaller instruments when they break. I am extremely fond of the skin
      on my big drum and was crushed to see a little nick on the edge a couple
      of months ago. I repaired it by slathering it with skin dust and super
      glue and it seems to be holding well, but I have been preparing myself
      to accept that at some point, it is going to let go. Now I know that
      when it happens, I can save the skin and reuse it someday. Yeah!

      All Love+
      Rachel

      Reverend R Clark wrote:
      >
      > Greetings Paul and ALL!
      >
      > Short answer: I don't believe so.
    • shorty@goatskins.com
      HI Rev R and all I agree, as long as adverse conditions do not arise, i see no reason for a skin not to last a long time, i would keep them in sealed bags,
      Message 2 of 28 , Jul 16, 2008
        HI Rev R and all
        I agree, as long as adverse conditions do not arise, i see no reason for a skin not to last a long time, i would keep them in sealed bags, trash cans with lids or something, checking on them once and a while, that might keep them from drying out to bad because i think they can dry some, if the dreaded weavels are a recuruing problem you can throw in few moth balls, they do not like them at all and they will stay away.
        that is my opinon,
        shorty
        www.goatskins.com
      • shorty@goatskins.com
        hi rachael and all i seldom reuse a skin, i do save them which means i have a lot of scrap, not a lot of broken heads but i get of different sizes of goat and
        Message 3 of 28 , Jul 16, 2008
          hi rachael and all
          i seldom reuse a skin, i do save them which means i have a lot of scrap, not a lot of broken heads but i get of different sizes of goat and cow, a lot of strips of goat along with some bigger pieces and a fair amount of cow scraps, all of which can be used for rattles and other small projects which leads me into, who wants some. this keeps the goat or cow still in use and is a green thing,
          contact me
          shorty
          www.goatskins.com




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • edhaggard@bellsouth.net
          Hey Shorty, Do you have calf skins for djembes? Just did Famadou s workshops and heard his djembe with a calf skin.  Ed thelovedrums.com ... hi rachael and
          Message 4 of 28 , Jul 16, 2008
            Hey Shorty,


            Do you have calf skins for djembes? Just did Famadou's workshops and heard his djembe with a calf skin. 
            Ed
            thelovedrums.com



            -------------- Original message from "shorty@..." <shorty@...>: --------------




            hi rachael and all
            i seldom reuse a skin, i do save them which means i have a lot of scrap, not a lot of broken heads but i get of different sizes of goat and cow, a lot of strips of goat along with some bigger pieces and a fair amount of cow scraps, all of which can be used for rattles and other small projects which leads me into, who wants some. this keeps the goat or cow still in use and is a green thing,
            contact me
            shorty
            www.goatskins.com

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Chris
            As for the moths that can get into your skins, or your pantry, for that matter, - Someone recommended SAFER moth traps. I got some off eBay and have been
            Message 5 of 28 , Jul 17, 2008
              As for the moths that can get into your skins, or your pantry, for that matter, -
              Someone recommended SAFER moth traps. I got some off eBay and have been moth/worm free ever since. No smells or chemicals, just happily moth free.

              Chris Bittner
              http://www.drumworksbychris.com

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Reverend R Clark
              Greetings Chris and ALL! SAFER brand traps offer a solution to more than one moth. To get clear, I suspect the one that works for you is the Clothes Moth
              Message 6 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                Greetings Chris and ALL!

                "SAFER" brand traps offer a solution to more than one moth. To get
                clear, I suspect the one that works for you is the "Clothes Moth"
                version. Or is it in fact the "Pantry Moth" or perhaps the "Gypsy
                Moth" versions?

                ------
                http://tinyurl.com/6lewkl
                <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=07270>

                Safer® Brand Clothes Moth Alert Trap
                Best used for: Eliminating > Moths

                Traps contain a patented pheromone lure that traps clothes moths.
                Protects clothing and furniture from costly moth damage. Contains 2
                traps per box.

                ON SALE! $6.99

                Regular Price: $7.99
                ------
                http://tinyurl.com/5h5g6y
                <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=05140>

                Safer® Brand Pantry Pest Trap
                Best used for: Eliminating > Moths

                Attracts and traps male grain moths, flour moths, meal moths, and
                seed moths. 1 trap covers a 1,000 sq. ft. area. Contains 2 traps per
                box. Model 05140

                $7.50
                ------
                http://tinyurl.com/6j4s3m
                <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=47050>

                Safer® Brand Gypsy Moth Trap
                Best used for: Gypsy Moth Control > Moths

                Ready to use. Contains patented Biolure controlled release pheromone
                system to lure insects into the trap and disrupt the mating cycle.

                $10.69
                ------

                Thanks for Everything!
                One Love, R
                ++++++

                "Chris" <congadaddy@...> wrote:
                > As for the moths that can get into your skins, or your pantry, for
                that matter, -
                > Someone recommended SAFER moth traps. I got some off eBay and
                have been moth/worm free ever since. No smells or chemicals, just
                happily moth free.
              • Rachel Nguyen
                Speaking of moths: I am reheading a couple of drums from a local school and when I took off the old skins the edge around the ring was filled with moth eggs.
                Message 7 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                  Speaking of moths:

                  I am reheading a couple of drums from a local school and when I took off
                  the old skins the edge around the ring was filled with moth eggs.
                  YUCK! I ran them outside to the trash can immediately, then washed the
                  ring to get the rest of the eggs off. I think the drums had been
                  sitting in a closet for awhile.

                  I can attest to the effectiveness of 'pantry pest' moth traps for pantry
                  moths. When we bought our house we had unexpected little friends living
                  in our cabinets.

                  I'd assume the clothes moth traps would work well too.

                  Best,
                  Rachel

                  Reverend R Clark wrote:
                  >
                  > Greetings Chris and ALL!
                  >
                  > "SAFER" brand traps offer a solution to more than one moth. To get
                  > clear, I suspect the one that works for you is the "Clothes Moth"
                  > version. Or is it in fact the "Pantry Moth" or perhaps the "Gypsy
                  > Moth" versions?
                  >
                  > ------
                  > http://tinyurl.com/6lewkl <http://tinyurl.com/6lewkl>
                  > <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=07270
                  > <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=07270>>
                  >
                  > Safer® Brand Clothes Moth Alert Trap
                  > Best used for: Eliminating > Moths
                  >
                  > Traps contain a patented pheromone lure that traps clothes moths.
                  > Protects clothing and furniture from costly moth damage. Contains 2
                  > traps per box.
                  >
                  > ON SALE! $6.99
                  >
                  > Regular Price: $7.99
                  > ------
                  > http://tinyurl.com/5h5g6y <http://tinyurl.com/5h5g6y>
                  > <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=05140
                  > <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=05140>>
                  >
                  > Safer® Brand Pantry Pest Trap
                  > Best used for: Eliminating > Moths
                  >
                  > Attracts and traps male grain moths, flour moths, meal moths, and
                  > seed moths. 1 trap covers a 1,000 sq. ft. area. Contains 2 traps per
                  > box. Model 05140
                  >
                  > $7.50
                  > ------
                  > http://tinyurl.com/6j4s3m <http://tinyurl.com/6j4s3m>
                  > <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=47050
                  > <http://www.saferbrand.com/store/product.asp?dept%5Fid=34&pf%5Fid=47050>>
                  >
                  > Safer® Brand Gypsy Moth Trap
                  > Best used for: Gypsy Moth Control > Moths
                  >
                  > Ready to use. Contains patented Biolure controlled release pheromone
                  > system to lure insects into the trap and disrupt the mating cycle.
                  >
                  > $10.69
                  > ------
                  >
                  > Thanks for Everything!
                  > One Love, R
                  > ++++++
                  >
                  > "Chris" <congadaddy@...> wrote:
                  > > As for the moths that can get into your skins, or your pantry, for
                  > that matter, -
                  > > Someone recommended SAFER moth traps. I got some off eBay and
                  > have been moth/worm free ever since. No smells or chemicals, just
                  > happily moth free.
                  >
                  >
                  > No virus found in this incoming message.
                  > Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
                  > Version: 8.0.138 / Virus Database: 270.5.0/1558 - Release Date: 7/17/2008 9:56 AM
                  >

                  --
                  Rachel Nguyen
                  Independent Future Director
                  The Pampered Chef
                  www.pamperedchef.biz/rachelnguyen




                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Kestrel
                  Hey DrumPeople! I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the first one I thought of for advice. The client s drum in question is a
                  Message 8 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                    Hey DrumPeople!

                    I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the first one I thought of for advice.

                    The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the umpteenth time.   I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well.  My next try was going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd try other ideas as well.

                    Any other suggestions?

                    Namaste!
                    Kestrel





















                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Kestrel
                    Hey Ed, I have a Mali djembe of Lingue with a calfskin head - I love it!  It has a very unusual sound unlike all the other djembes out there... almost like
                    Message 9 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                      Hey Ed,
                      I have a Mali djembe of Lingue with a calfskin head - I love it!  It has a very unusual sound unlike all the other djembes out there... almost like combining a djun set together in one djembe
                    • urdab58
                      if you are referring to the big djalla drum that Famoudou was playing, he told me it was antelope skin. you can tell by the heavy stripe on the spine and then
                      Message 10 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                        if you are referring to the big djalla drum that Famoudou was playing,
                        he told me it was antelope skin. you can tell by the heavy stripe on
                        the spine and then the stripes that kinda branch off to the side.

                        the hare drum helen was playing is headed with calf skin. Famoudou
                        has toured around the US playing that as his lead drum.
                      • Steven Courtright
                        Original Tite-bond is as good as an adhesive as anything out there and if a proper joint is glued with it the result will be stronger that the wood. In other
                        Message 11 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                          Original Tite-bond is as good as an adhesive as anything out there and if a proper joint is glued with it the result will be stronger that the wood. In other words, the wood will fail before the glue joint. However, (just guessing) it sounds like you are trying to glue end grain to end grain. If this is the case, it is almost impossible to get the adhesive to hold the joint together. End to end joints simply don't work and are never used in furniture making or other wood items if one expects the joint to hold. If you have to glue, 2 part wood Epoxy might work better if the joint is end to end, but it is still a long shot.

                          Good luck!

                          S. Courtright



                          ----- Original Message ----
                          From: Kestrel <shonti69@...>
                          To: djembe-l@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Friday, July 18, 2008 9:10:54 AM
                          Subject: [Djembe-L] shell repair and adhesive strength



                          Hey DrumPeople!

                          I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the first one I thought of for advice.

                          The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the umpteenth time. I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well. My next try was going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd try other ideas as well.

                          Any other suggestions?

                          Namaste!
                          Kestrel










                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Doug Rigaux
                          I would probably use an epoxy, particularly the carvable type, although more prone to adhesive failure due to shock, it will also seal any gaps there may be.
                          Message 12 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                            I would probably use an epoxy, particularly the carvable type, although more prone to adhesive failure due to shock, it will also seal any gaps there may be. for the umpteenth time implies it has been repaired or re glued often, so there is likely to be a lot of dried glue and bits that ought to be cleaned up for which I might suggest washing with methyl hydrate or denatured alcohol. but really the man need a new african drum :) cheers and best wishes

                            To: djembe-l@yahoogroups.com
                            From: shonti69@...
                            Date: Fri, 18 Jul 2008 07:10:54 -0700
                            Subject: [Djembe-L] shell repair and adhesive strength






















                            Hey DrumPeople!



                            I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the first one I thought of for advice.



                            The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the umpteenth time. I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well. My next try was going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd try other ideas as well.



                            Any other suggestions?



                            Namaste!

                            Kestrel





















                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
























                            _________________________________________________________________



                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Chris
                            What you need, my friend, is a good quality EPOXY. Like glue, but WAY better. Make sure you get enough to fill the bowl/bell joint. Clean out all the old
                            Message 13 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                              What you need, my friend, is a good quality EPOXY. Like glue, but WAY better. Make sure you get enough to fill the bowl/bell joint. Clean out all the old glue. If there will be voids in the joint, mix in some medium to fine sawdust to make the epoxy stiffer, fill the joint liberally. Let it cure properly and it should be very strong. : )

                              Help this hopes,
                              Chris Bittner
                              http://www.drumworksbychris.com


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: Kestrel
                              To: djembe-l@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Friday, July 18, 2008 10:10 AM
                              Subject: [Djembe-L] shell repair and adhesive strength



                              Hey DrumPeople!

                              I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the first one I thought of for advice.

                              The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the umpteenth time. I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well. My next try was going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd try other ideas as well.

                              Any other suggestions?

                              Namaste!
                              Kestrel










                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            • African Drum Creations
                              Hi Kestrel If it s strength I need I always use a 2 part epoxy, e.g. Araldite. If you can get to the inside and reinforce with some carefully positioned screws
                              Message 14 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                                Hi Kestrel
                                If it's strength I need I always use a 2 part epoxy, e.g. Araldite. If you can get to the inside and reinforce with some carefully positioned screws across the join that woldn't go through to the outside that would help. Glue & screw is the wooden boatbuilders' old fashioned favourite.
                                Whatever you use, the gap has to be as small as possible, as we are looking at substances which are AD-hesive (stick to something) not CO-hesive (stick to itself and stay together) so if there is a big space you're trying to fill with glue it ain't gonna do the trick. Any joint needs to be clamped up really tight until the adhesive sets too

                                good luck
                                Jeremy
                                Kiama
                                NSW Australia
                                temporary home of the Pope....... ;o)






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                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • shorty@goatskins.com
                                hi kestrel i am a big fan of tite bond, but i only use original. just make sure you put enough of it on. what have they been using to hold it together, i would
                                Message 15 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                                  hi kestrel
                                  i am a big fan of tite bond, but i only use original. just make sure you put enough of it on. what have they been using to hold it together, i would like to know
                                  shorty
                                  www.goatskins.com

                                  Kestrel <shonti69@...> wrote:

                                  Hey DrumPeople!

                                  I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the first one I thought of for advice.

                                  The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the umpteenth time. I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well. My next try was going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd try other ideas as well.

                                  Any other suggestions?

                                  Namaste!
                                  Kestrel










                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                • Ed Haggard
                                  Famadou was playing a djembe in Nashville that was calf skinned. Helen s as well. I did not see the one skinned with antelope. Ed ... [Non-text portions of
                                  Message 16 of 28 , Jul 18, 2008
                                    Famadou was playing a djembe in Nashville that was calf skinned.
                                    Helen's as well. I did not see the one skinned with antelope.
                                    Ed

                                    On Jul 18, 2008, at 10:06 AM, urdab58 wrote:

                                    > if you are referring to the big djalla drum that Famoudou was playing,
                                    > he told me it was antelope skin. you can tell by the heavy stripe on
                                    > the spine and then the stripes that kinda branch off to the side.
                                    >
                                    > the hare drum helen was playing is headed with calf skin. Famoudou
                                    > has toured around the US playing that as his lead drum.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >



                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • merlinsythove
                                    ... first one I thought of for advice. ... drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the umpteenth time.   I was thinking about Liquid Nail,
                                    Message 17 of 28 , Jul 19, 2008
                                      --- In djembe-l@yahoogroups.com, Kestrel <shonti69@...> wrote:
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > Hey DrumPeople!
                                      >
                                      > I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the
                                      first one I thought of for advice.
                                      >
                                      > The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave
                                      drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the
                                      umpteenth time.   I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that
                                      last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well.  My next try was
                                      going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd
                                      try other ideas as well.
                                      >
                                      > Any other suggestions?

                                      I would go for plain old (white) wood glue and 6 dowels. However, if
                                      the wood has been oiled at any time in the past, no glue will hold
                                      properly, you may have to revert to using dowels and metal plates on
                                      the inside to screw both ends together. Considering the pounding a
                                      djembe takes, I would not give guarantees in the last case :-)

                                      Happy drumming!
                                      Dennis
                                    • Bill Saragosa
                                      ... Hi Kestrel, Depending on what this drum looks like, I might use epoxy resin(1st choice), or polyester resin (2nd choice), and fiberglass cloth with either.
                                      Message 18 of 28 , Jul 19, 2008
                                        > Any other suggestions?
                                        >
                                        > Namaste!
                                        > Kestrel

                                        Hi Kestrel,

                                        Depending on what this drum looks like, I might use epoxy resin(1st
                                        choice), or polyester resin (2nd choice), and fiberglass cloth with
                                        either. That stuff is very strong.

                                        If you have never used that material, do some tests. It is VERY
                                        sticky, runny, gloppy stuff.

                                        Mix in small amounts.

                                        Use gloves.

                                        Be prepared to use single-use brushes.

                                        Work outdoors, in the shade, if possible.
                                        (Heat accelerates the setting time)

                                        Avoid breathing fumes and dust.

                                        Vinegar will clean still-unset epoxy off surfaces, tools, and skin.

                                        Epoxy is less toxic (and a little slower setting) than polyester resin.

                                        Look for supplies at a boatyard, or a supplier such as Westsystems or
                                        any marine supply online.

                                        Small jobs may be handled with ordinary epoxy cement and a bit of
                                        fiberglass cloth.

                                        Once set, resins may be filed, sanded and otherwise shaped, including
                                        the bearing edges of the drum. Again, avoid breathing the dust!

                                        Good Luck,
                                        Bill Saragosa
                                      • Kestrel
                                        I think this is like the 3rd time that this drum has been reglued , so I had to do a lot of scraping and rasping to get all the crap off... I was thinking
                                        Message 19 of 28 , Jul 19, 2008
                                          I think this is like the 3rd time that this drum has been reglued , so I had to do a lot of scraping and rasping to get all the crap off... I was thinking Liquid Nail, but I tried it on some scrap and didn't like the results...

                                          --- On Fri, 7/18/08, shorty@... <shorty@...> wrote:
                                          From: shorty@... <shorty@...>
                                          Subject: Re: [Djembe-L] shell repair and adhesive strength
                                          To: djembe-l@yahoogroups.com
                                          Date: Friday, July 18, 2008, 10:33 PM











                                          hi kestrel

                                          i am a big fan of tite bond, but i only use original. just make sure you put enough of it on. what have they been using to hold it together, i would like to know

                                          shorty

                                          www.goatskins. com



                                          Kestrel <shonti69@yahoo. com> wrote:



                                          Hey DrumPeople!



                                          I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the first one I thought of for advice.



                                          The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the umpteenth time. I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well. My next try was going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd try other ideas as well.



                                          Any other suggestions?



                                          Namaste!

                                          Kestrel



                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





























                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • rlruhlen@earthlink.net
                                          This is the only method suggested so far that has any chance of holding up for any time. The lateral stress against the joint, amplified by the distance from
                                          Message 20 of 28 , Jul 19, 2008
                                            This is the only method suggested so far that has any chance of holding up for any time. The lateral stress against the joint, amplified by the distance from either end to the joint, will break any kind of "glue" including epoxy. The dowel process involves a lot of preparation, precise measurements and alignment, and a good shop. The cost for this, unless you do it yourself or have someone else give away his time and expertise, will exceed the cost of a new djembe.

                                            -----Original Message-----
                                            >From: merlinsythove <Merlin@...>
                                            >Sent: Jul 19, 2008 12:47 AM
                                            >To: djembe-l@yahoogroups.com
                                            >Subject: [Djembe-L] Re: shell repair and adhesive strength
                                            >
                                            >--- In djembe-l@yahoogroups.com, Kestrel <shonti69@...> wrote:
                                            >>
                                            >>
                                            >> Hey DrumPeople!
                                            >>
                                            >> I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the
                                            >first one I thought of for advice.
                                            >>
                                            >> The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave
                                            >drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the
                                            >umpteenth time. I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that
                                            >last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well. My next try was
                                            >going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd
                                            >try other ideas as well.
                                            >>
                                            >> Any other suggestions?
                                            >
                                            >I would go for plain old (white) wood glue and 6 dowels. However, if
                                            >the wood has been oiled at any time in the past, no glue will hold
                                            >properly, you may have to revert to using dowels and metal plates on
                                            >the inside to screw both ends together. Considering the pounding a
                                            >djembe takes, I would not give guarantees in the last case :-)
                                            >
                                            >Happy drumming!
                                            >Dennis
                                            >
                                            >
                                            >------------------------------------
                                            >
                                            >
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                                            >
                                          • Chris
                                            Also, for what it s worth, John Millen s djembes (ThunderHeartDrums) are staved construction with the bowl and bell meeting in a butt joint, end to end. I
                                            Message 21 of 28 , Jul 19, 2008
                                              Also, for what it's worth, John Millen's djembes (ThunderHeartDrums) are staved construction with the bowl and bell meeting in a butt joint, end to end. I bought one of his djembes years ago and marvelled that this joint was working out for him on hundreds of drums. He told me he used epoxy plus (I can't remember which) dowel pins or biscuit inserts. If it is a butt joint, I would try this with dowel pins.

                                              Good Luck!
                                              Chris Bittner
                                              http://www.drumworksbychris.com

                                              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            • Ray Ruhlen
                                              IMHO this is the only method that has a chance of producing a lasting bond. The forces against the joint and the length between the joint and both ends where
                                              Message 22 of 28 , Jul 19, 2008
                                                IMHO this is the only method that has a chance of producing a lasting
                                                bond. The forces against the joint and the length between the joint and
                                                both ends where the stress is put, makes any other method, including
                                                epoxy, doubtful and insufficient.Using Tite-bond glue would be good. It
                                                is still a job only for a precise experienced knowledgeable wood worker,
                                                with precision tools. Both mating surfaces have to be entirely flat,
                                                parallel with each other, the surface of the bottom and the surface of
                                                the top. Both mating surfaces should be taken down to fresh wood. The
                                                dowel holes need to be perpendicular to both the plane of the bottom and
                                                of the top, a tight fit for the dowels and to the proper depth. The glue
                                                has to be applied to the dowels and the mating surfaces, then the two
                                                pieces held straight and tightly together until the glue hardens. Takes
                                                a precision jig or machine press. If you dont do it yourself, unless the
                                                worker is donating his time and expertise it will cost you as much or
                                                more than the cost of a new djembe.If you do it yourself and dont charge
                                                him that much you are giving your work and talent away.
                                                Ray

                                                merlinsythove wrote:
                                                > --- In djembe-l@yahoogroups.com, Kestrel <shonti69@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                >> Hey DrumPeople!
                                                >>
                                                >> I have a repair job which is a bit of a puzzlement and you are the
                                                >>
                                                > first one I thought of for advice.
                                                >
                                                >> The client's drum in question is a hardwood (Walnut and Oak) stave
                                                >>
                                                > drum djembe, and the bell has separated from the stem for the
                                                > umpteenth time. I was thinking about Liquid Nail, but I tried that
                                                > last night on some scrap and it didn't hold well. My next try was
                                                > going to be Tite-Bond, which was my first thought, but I thought I'd
                                                > try other ideas as well.
                                                >
                                                >> Any other suggestions?
                                                >>
                                                >
                                                > I would go for plain old (white) wood glue and 6 dowels. However, if
                                                > the wood has been oiled at any time in the past, no glue will hold
                                                > properly, you may have to revert to using dowels and metal plates on
                                                > the inside to screw both ends together. Considering the pounding a
                                                > djembe takes, I would not give guarantees in the last case :-)
                                                >
                                                > Happy drumming!
                                                > Dennis
                                                >
                                                >
                                                > ------------------------------------
                                                >
                                                >
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                                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                              • Rob Wandell
                                                Honestly, if it has happened more than once, I think the only solution (well, besides getting a better drum) is epoxy and screws from inside the bowl down into
                                                Message 23 of 28 , Jul 20, 2008
                                                  Honestly, if it has happened more than once, I think the only solution (well, besides getting a better drum)
                                                  is epoxy and screws from inside the bowl down into the stem. Without the screws, even epoxy will
                                                  fail in short order on this type of endgrain joint.

                                                  Rob Wandell

                                                  Imagicka

                                                  15 Hawley

                                                  Street Binghamton, NY 13901

                                                  (607)348-0090

                                                  http://www.imagicka.com

                                                  http://www.primalbeat.com


                                                  To: djembe-l@yahoogroups.com
                                                  From: bsaragosa@...
                                                  Date: Sat, 19 Jul 2008 10:37:00 +0000
                                                  Subject: [Djembe-L] Re: shell repair and adhesive strength






















                                                  > Any other suggestions?

                                                  >

                                                  > Namaste!

                                                  > Kestrel



                                                  Hi Kestrel,



                                                  Depending on what this drum looks like, I might use epoxy resin(1st

                                                  choice), or polyester resin (2nd choice), and fiberglass cloth with

                                                  either. That stuff is very strong.



                                                  If you have never used that material, do some tests. It is VERY

                                                  sticky, runny, gloppy stuff.



                                                  Mix in small amounts.



                                                  Use gloves.



                                                  Be prepared to use single-use brushes.



                                                  Work outdoors, in the shade, if possible.

                                                  (Heat accelerates the setting time)



                                                  Avoid breathing fumes and dust.



                                                  Vinegar will clean still-unset epoxy off surfaces, tools, and skin.



                                                  Epoxy is less toxic (and a little slower setting) than polyester resin.



                                                  Look for supplies at a boatyard, or a supplier such as Westsystems or

                                                  any marine supply online.



                                                  Small jobs may be handled with ordinary epoxy cement and a bit of

                                                  fiberglass cloth.



                                                  Once set, resins may be filed, sanded and otherwise shaped, including

                                                  the bearing edges of the drum. Again, avoid breathing the dust!



                                                  Good Luck,

                                                  Bill Saragosa

























                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Happy Shel
                                                  I recommend Magic Putty. It s an epoxy product that can be molded, sanded, painted or stained. It s relatively low cost abt $10 a tube. You can get it at a
                                                  Message 24 of 28 , Jul 20, 2008
                                                    I recommend Magic Putty. It's an epoxy product that can be molded, sanded,
                                                    painted or stained. It's relatively low cost abt $10 a tube. You can get
                                                    it at a local TruValue hardware store or online:
                                                    www.magicputty.com. It's very strong!

                                                    ._,___

                                                    --
                                                    Peace & Love,
                                                    HappyShel
                                                    Founder & Webmaster Drums Not Guns www.drums.org/dng
                                                    Are you a member? If not, become a member!
                                                    www.drums.org/dng/join.htm
                                                  • Chris
                                                    Rev. R, It turns out my moth traps are food traps made by Catchmaster. I ordered SAFER brand but those are what I got. They are still the non-toxic,
                                                    Message 25 of 28 , Jul 20, 2008
                                                      Rev. R, It turns out my moth traps are food traps made by Catchmaster. I ordered "SAFER" brand but those are what I got. They are still the non-toxic, adhesive kind with pheromone bait. Worked a charm in my pantry, and caught a few near the goatskins, too. Near as I can see, they are similar moths, so all is well, as near as I can tell.

                                                      Chris Bittner
                                                      http://www.drumworksbychris.com
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