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Remo Festival series

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  • Joe Sensor
    I must say that despite being a bit of a purist at times with my Djembe, I kind of like the festival series with the pretuned heads.... they are very light and
    Message 1 of 4 , May 2, 2007
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      I must say that despite being a bit of a purist at times with my Djembe, I kind of like the festival series with the pretuned heads.... they are very light and easy for elementary school kids to handle- the bass is decent, and the tone is brighter, kind of dumbek-like... mixed with "real" djembes they are a nice compliment. They are cheap too... Anyone else ever use these?

      Joseph L. Sensor
      Instrumental/ Classroom Music Instructor
      Wasson Avenue Elementary School
      DuBois Area School District
      Web Page: http://www.dasd.k12.pa.us/5852010169412187/site/default.asp
      School: 814-371-6171
      Cell: 814-594-8859


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jeff
      Hi Joe, I m Djembe-less at the moment. I m tempted by the Remo drums because of my lazy attitude to instrument care, and the fact I wouldn t mind Djembe-ing in
      Message 2 of 4 , May 9, 2007
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        Hi Joe,
        I'm Djembe-less at the moment. I'm tempted by the Remo drums
        because of my lazy attitude to instrument care, and the fact I
        wouldn't mind Djembe-ing in the rain.
        I wonder though if I would be looked down on a bit for having a non
        natural drum? I haven't started drumming yet, but it seems inevitable
        that I will given the excitement I feel about it. I'd hate to join a
        group and put everyones nose out of joint by having a 'non
        traditional' drum.
        The obvious answer is to have two :-)
        Are the Remo drums pretty indestructable?

        Jeff.



        --- In djembe-l@yahoogroups.com, Joe Sensor <jsensor@...> wrote:
        >
        > I must say that despite being a bit of a purist at times with my
        Djembe, I kind of like the festival series with the pretuned heads....
        they are very light and easy for elementary school kids to handle- the
        bass is decent, and the tone is brighter, kind of dumbek-like... mixed
        with "real" djembes they are a nice compliment. They are cheap too...
        Anyone else ever use these?
      • david comfort
        depends on what kind of scenario you want to drum in. if you want to learn traditional style, know that remos can sound ok played with proper technique and
        Message 3 of 4 , May 13, 2007
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          depends on what kind of scenario you want to drum in. if you want to learn traditional style, know that remos can sound ok played with proper technique and tuning. my observation is that by the time a drummer has some ability in these areas, he or she has usually moved on to a more traditional djembe.

          if you just want to jam, the makeup of a circle may determine whether a remo is welcome. if it's all happy hippy bangers, they probably won't care. if it's more than a couple dozen or so drummers, it won't matter because it'll be a big shapeless blob of sound no matter what. if it's a more mature, experienced and 'musical' circle, you may well get some glares, especially if you're packing the 14 inch or 16 inch model, whose volume and endless ring are subtlety's death sentence.

          the only remo djembe i ever enjoyed playing was a 10-inch model. if you must have a remo, this is the one i recommend.

          Jeff <jeff-barton@...> wrote:
          Hi Joe,
          I'm Djembe-less at the moment. I'm tempted by the Remo drums
          because of my lazy attitude to instrument care, and the fact I
          wouldn't mind Djembe-ing in the rain.
          I wonder though if I would be looked down on a bit for having a non
          natural drum? I haven't started drumming yet, but it seems inevitable
          that I will given the excitement I feel about it. I'd hate to join a
          group and put everyones nose out of joint by having a 'non
          traditional' drum.
          The obvious answer is to have two :-)
          Are the Remo drums pretty indestructable?

          Jeff.

          --- In djembe-l@yahoogroups.com, Joe Sensor <jsensor@...> wrote:
          >
          > I must say that despite being a bit of a purist at times with my
          Djembe, I kind of like the festival series with the pretuned heads....
          they are very light and easy for elementary school kids to handle- the
          bass is decent, and the tone is brighter, kind of dumbek-like... mixed
          with "real" djembes they are a nice compliment. They are cheap too...
          Anyone else ever use these?
        • Jeff barton
          Thanks David, Being a paranoid type regarding things going wrong with stuff I d probably be better off with a Remo, or better still two drums. I see what you
          Message 4 of 4 , May 14, 2007
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            Thanks David,
            Being a paranoid type regarding things going wrong with stuff I'd
            probably be better off with a Remo, or better still two drums.
            I see what you mean about the different groups (hippy or professional
            etc) determining how they'll react to the type of drum you turn up with.
            Your words have made me reconsider the size of drum too. I always thought
            biggest was best, but I now realise the 'decay' of the sound and booming
            quality could well ruin a more serious groups sound.
            Interesting stuff. I think the hippy happy crowd would suit me better at
            the moment:-)


            Jeff.
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