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rubber bottom - nails

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  • an4477
    Hi, I have a question concerning rubber bottoms and nails. I bought a djembe with a rubber bottom recently. The rubber is nailed to the wood. I am concerned
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 30, 2007
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      Hi,

      I have a question concerning rubber bottoms and nails. I bought a
      djembe with a rubber bottom recently. The rubber is nailed to the
      wood. I am concerned that the nails might weaken the wood. When making
      some repairs to the shell, I found out that the nails were much bigger
      than necessary... So here is my question: Given that the nails are
      already there, is it better for the djembe to left them in place, or
      else take them out and 'repair' the wholes?

      I already had another djembe with a nailed rubber bottom cracked by an
      airline and the crack was right near one of those nails.... so I take
      it that the issue is somewhat real.
      Peace,
      Ivan
    • acmoder
      Hi Ivan In my perception, and depending on the final size of the nail (if the nail size is less than the 10% of the total thickness of the wood where it s
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 3, 2007
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        Hi Ivan

        In my perception, and depending on the final size of the nail (if the
        nail size is less than the 10% of the total thickness of the wood
        where it's nailed), personally would leave it there.

        If some of this nails are larger than this and/or become loose due to
        the use or resonance, do recommend to apply a resin to the nail and
        the wood around so the are 'fixed-for-life'.

        If you're not sure about the resin application/result, some other
        glues for wood will work as well.

        What i can tell you for sure (also sure you already know) is: Be
        careful about any cracks generated due to this...all this also has a
        way to repair but hope don't get to that soon....

        Good luck !

        Alfonso


        Ivan, "an4477" <an4477@...> wrote:
        > I have a question concerning rubber bottoms and nails. I bought a
        > djembe with a rubber bottom recently. The rubber is nailed to the
        > wood. I am concerned that the nails might weaken the wood. When making
        > some repairs to the shell, I found out that the nails were much bigger
        > than necessary... So here is my question: Given that the nails are
        > already there, is it better for the djembe to left them in place, or
        > else take them out and 'repair' the wholes?
        >
        > I already had another djembe with a nailed rubber bottom cracked by an
        > airline and the crack was right near one of those nails.... so I take
        > it that the issue is somewhat real.
      • urdab58
        i personally dont like nails or screws in my djembes for the protective bottoms but my Hare shell does have the bike tire with screws on it. i would say leave
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 3, 2007
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          i personally dont' like nails or screws in my djembes for the
          protective bottoms but my Hare shell does have the bike tire with
          screws on it.

          i would say leave it on there. taking them out and trying to repair
          could make it look pretty ghetto. are aesthetics important?

          are you going to put rubber back on?

          all my other shells have a half inch rubber bottom epoxy'd on. looks
          nice and clean.

          email me for pics if you want.

          Ivan, "an4477" <an4477@...> wrote:
          > I have a question concerning rubber bottoms and nails. I bought a
          > djembe with a rubber bottom recently. The rubber is nailed to the
          > wood. I am concerned that the nails might weaken the wood. When making
          > some repairs to the shell, I found out that the nails were much bigger
          > than necessary... So here is my question: Given that the nails are
          > already there, is it better for the djembe to left them in place, or
          > else take them out and 'repair' the wholes?
          >
          > I already had another djembe with a nailed rubber bottom cracked by an
          > airline and the crack was right near one of those nails.... so I take
          > it that the issue is somewhat real.
        • Reverend R Clark
          Greetings Ivan, Alfonso and ALL! ... If the crack is tiny I would leave it alone. If it is larger or should the crack continue to split, which in my experience
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 5, 2007
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            Greetings Ivan, Alfonso and ALL!

            Alfonso, "acmoder" <acorona@...> wrote:
            > What i can tell you for sure (also sure you already know) is: Be
            > careful about any cracks generated due to this...all this also has a
            > way to repair but hope don't get to that soon....

            If the crack is tiny I would leave it alone. If it is larger or
            should the crack continue to split, which in my experience isn't
            unusual, I would pull the nail and repair the crack.

            The repairing of cracks is a "FAQ" (Frequently Answered Question) so
            if you need more details, you may consult the list Archive
            <http://launch.groups.yahoo.com/group/djembe-l/messages> or ask for
            clarification if you wish. The original source of this method is
            Shorty Palmer, I believe, and at the very least he and the rest of
            us "Djembe-L-ders" (What Is the term for a former newbie?) perfected
            it here on the list and in our humble shops.

            Repairing a crack is quite simple, drill a small hole clear thru the
            shell of the drum at the extreme end of the crack, this will normally
            stop the crack from proceeding further even if not glued. However,
            actually repairing the crack is highly recommended. This is done by
            obtaining some sanding dust from the interior, bottom or bearing edge
            of the drum to be repaired or from similar wood, this insures a close
            color match. Pass this wood powder through a nylon stocking or sieve
            and mix with a good quality glue like Titebond II (H2O resistant) or
            better III (H2O proof) to make a paste. Widen the crack a bit using a
            knife or sharp instrument to insure that you can work this paste into
            the crack, backfilling it and the hole you drilled. Gently wipe any
            excess mixture from the surrounding wood with a dampened rag and
            let the repair dry as per the directions on the glue.

            I hope this Helps!
            Thanks for Everything!
            One Love, R
            ++++++
            "If I could I would always work in silence and obscurity, and let my
            efforts be known by their results."
            - Emily Bronte (1818-1848)
            ++++++
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