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Re: [Djembe-L] anyone know a good suppier for Djembe and Djun Djun rings?

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  • Lindsay Rowlands
    ... We have to assume you re talking about a staved dun dun. Well, you re not building a 45 geodesic dome so structural strength is not a big issue. Pin
    Message 1 of 7 , Nov 30, 2003
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      On 01/12/2003, at 3:45 PM, Standing Bear wrote:

      > Greetings all
      >
      > I am in the process of planning out and manufacturing a set of
      > Djuns.. any thoughts and suggestions?
      >
      > My main issue is whether or not to pin dowel the sides, and glue, or
      > just glue and clamp. then.. I am trying to find a quality supplier
      > for rings, and skin at not such a high price..

      We have to assume you're talking about a staved dun dun.

      Well, you're not building a 45' geodesic dome so structural strength
      is not a big issue. Pin dowelling is way too fussy and unnecessary.
      Wood glues are generally stronger than the actual cellular
      structure of wood and are more than adequate for the task asked of
      them in this case. All the wood has to do is oppose the
      compression forces of the skin which, by default, it does quite well.
      If the glue holds the drum together while you wrestle a skin
      onto it, it has done its job.

      Why not make the rings yourself. The process is certainly easier and
      quicker than making the shell.

      Quality, cheap? That's not quite how the world works.

      Cheerz,
      Lynzz
    • Shorty
      hi standing bear, if you glue down the sides of a djun, you will have a drum that is non tuneable. that might not be a good idea. you are asking for rings, are
      Message 2 of 7 , Dec 1, 2003
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        hi standing bear,

        if you glue down the sides of a djun, you will have a drum that is non tuneable. that might not be a good idea. you are asking for rings, are they for the same drum? i make custom rings and sell skins, contact me privately. if you need more help and advise keep asking and you will get plenty of answers.

        happy drumming

        shorty

        www.goatskins.com


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Steven Courtright
        Drew, Modern glues are very strong, in fact stronger that most wood used to make stuff. If, when you refer to dowels, you are proposing to use dowels to align
        Message 3 of 7 , Dec 1, 2003
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          Drew,

          Modern glues are very strong, in fact stronger that
          most wood used to make stuff. If, when you refer to
          dowels, you are proposing to use dowels to align
          different parts of the drum, i.e., staves or the like,
          my advice is don't bother. Dowels shrink and at some
          point will fail to hold the joint together. furniture
          made with dowels always fails along the dowel joint.

          It is better to use a butt joint without dowels to
          maximize glue surface area. If alignment of wood
          parts is a problem, use splines which, like tenons,
          actually increase the glue area and also function to
          align parts while the glue sets up. Furthermore, use
          splines of the same wood with which you are fashioning
          the drum to eliminate different expansion tendencies
          of different materials. Good luck!

          Cheers,
          Steve Courtright

          --- Standing Bear <DGardin@...> wrote:
          > Greetings all
          >
          > I am in the process of planning out and
          > manufacturing a set of
          > Djuns.. any thoughts and suggestions?
          >
          > My main issue is whether or not to pin dowel the
          > sides, and glue, or
          > just glue and clamp. then.. I am trying to find a
          > quality supplier
          > for rings, and skin at not such a high price..
          >
          > any ideas?
          >
          > Peace
          > Drew


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        • Standing Bear
          Lynzz, thanks, I tend to build for excessive strength, and have yet to try this construction. In the past I have made other projects with a design that
          Message 4 of 7 , Dec 2, 2003
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            Lynzz,

            thanks, I tend to build for excessive strength, and have yet to try
            this construction. In the past I have made other projects with a
            design that compensates for potential(not actual) weaknesses. This
            comes from my initial training as a racing bicycle and motorcycle
            mechanic.

            within the past 3 years I have switched to more projects with wood.
            This, however, will be my first drum manufacture. so I am looking
            for any available information. I know that quality does not often
            come cheap, but for a first project, I am looking for prototype -
            designs and ideas..and materials that are medium grade. Once I have
            viewed any flaws, and corrected them.. then I will move to top grade
            materials.

            Peace to you
            Drew
          • Lindsay Rowlands
            ... Cool. I too was a racing motorcycle mechanic - Ducatis, Bultacos and general Japanese/British mounts. That was in the late 70s and now I fix bicycles, but
            Message 5 of 7 , Dec 2, 2003
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              On 03/12/2003, at 3:58 AM, Standing Bear wrote:

              > Lynzz,
              >
              > thanks, I tend to build for excessive strength, and have yet to try
              > this construction. In the past I have made other projects with a
              > design that compensates for potential(not actual) weaknesses. This
              > comes from my initial training as a racing bicycle and motorcycle
              > mechanic.

              Cool. I too was a racing motorcycle mechanic - Ducatis, Bultacos and
              general Japanese/British mounts. That was in the late 70s and now I
              fix bicycles, but mostly my own. I've got a bit of a business
              going fixing STI levers, you know, the Rubic's cube of cycling.
              I left motorcycle wrenching to attend university and now find
              that I'm an ethnomusicologist.

              In terms of drum building, consider that just about any drum you
              make, regardless of it's structural veracity, you will be able to
              hand on to your grandchildren.

              In other words, I wouldn't stress about it too much. Consider that
              most instruments in many traditional cultures aren't agonised over
              or revered nearly as much as we carry on with in the west, and may
              even be considered disposable.

              Cheerz,
              Lynzz
            • Carl D Cravens
              ... I ve seen and heard nice ashikos made from recycled pine from demolished barns. -- Carl D Cravens (raven@phoenyx.net) Wichita, Kansas, US -- Read my
              Message 6 of 7 , Dec 2, 2003
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                On Tue, 2 Dec 2003, Standing Bear wrote:

                > This, however, will be my first drum manufacture. so I am looking
                > for any available information. I know that quality does not often
                > come cheap, but for a first project, I am looking for prototype -
                > designs and ideas..and materials that are medium grade. Once I have
                > viewed any flaws, and corrected them.. then I will move to top grade
                > materials.

                I've seen and heard nice ashikos made from recycled pine from demolished
                barns.

                --
                Carl D Cravens (raven@...)
                Wichita, Kansas, US -- Read my "Drum circles in Kansas" journal
                http://raven.phoenyx.net/drum_kansas/
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