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Using mirrors to increase the throw distance

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  • achillepomeroy
    Hello, all! I ve been throwing around some designs for a DLP printer, and have noticed that on all the printers that I ve seen, the projector is always pointed
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 28, 2013
      Hello, all! I've been throwing around some designs for a DLP printer, and have noticed that on all the printers that I've seen, the projector is always pointed straight at the vat. This results in either a very tall printer, or one in which projector modification is required to reduce the throw distance to a distance that works, as is diagrammed in this link: http://i.imgur.com/S7KFyOM.png

      Is there a particular reason that there have been no printers that use a mirror at 45 degrees to increase the throw distance? It seems to me that that would be easier than modifying the projecter's lenses. A diagram of what I mean can be seen at this link: http://i.imgur.com/i9pb78E.png

      I am going to implement this design into my printer, and will let you all know how it goes! (That is, of course, someone can give me a compelling reason not to.)

      Any thoughts on this setup?
    • Benjamin Mahony
      The modification is to allow the projectors to focus at very short throw distance = small image size = intense and high detail. I use a 45 degree first surface
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 28, 2013
        The modification is to allow the projectors to focus at very short throw distance = small image size = intense and high detail.

        I use a 45 degree first surface mirror in mine purely so that the projector sits horizontal because of concerns of the longevity of the bulb and other components running outside of their expected orientation. 
        Apparently the orientation of the projector (pointing up) is Ok in the B9 creator, the projector manufacture conformed.
        Ben M 


        On 29/04/2013 12:35 PM, achillepomeroy wrote:
         

        Hello, all! I've been throwing around some designs for a DLP printer, and have noticed that on all the printers that I've seen, the projector is always pointed straight at the vat. This results in either a very tall printer, or one in which projector modification is required to reduce the throw distance to a distance that works, as is diagrammed in this link: http://i.imgur.com/S7KFyOM.png

        Is there a particular reason that there have been no printers that use a mirror at 45 degrees to increase the throw distance? It seems to me that that would be easier than modifying the projecter's lenses. A diagram of what I mean can be seen at this link: http://i.imgur.com/i9pb78E.png

        I am going to implement this design into my printer, and will let you all know how it goes! (That is, of course, someone can give me a compelling reason not to.)

        Any thoughts on this setup?


      • Graham Stabler
        ... Exactly it is not so much about the throw itself but the minimum image size achievable. Graham
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 29, 2013



          On Mon, Apr 29, 2013 at 4:17 AM, Benjamin Mahony <ben.mahony@...> wrote:
           

          The modification is to allow the projectors to focus at very short throw distance = small image size = intense and high detail.


          Exactly it is not so much about the throw itself but the minimum image size achievable.

          Graham

           
        • achillepomeroy
          Ah, I see. Looks like I ll have to rethink my design a bit, then. Thanks for the info!
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 29, 2013
            Ah, I see. Looks like I'll have to rethink my design a bit, then. Thanks for the info!

            --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Graham Stabler <grezmos@...> wrote:
            >
            > On Mon, Apr 29, 2013 at 4:17 AM, Benjamin Mahony <ben.mahony@...>wrote:
            >
            > > **
            > >
            > >
            > > The modification is to allow the projectors to focus at very short throw
            > > distance = small image size = intense and high detail.
            > >
            >
            >
            > Exactly it is not so much about the throw itself but the minimum image
            > size achievable.
            >
            > Graham
            >
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