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How far 3D printing has (not) come since Good Morning America - January 1989

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  • arthur2shedsj
    http://www.3ders.org/articles/20130226-how-far-3d-printing-has-come-since-good-morning-america-1989.html I found this video amusing and sad at the same time.
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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      http://www.3ders.org/articles/20130226-how-far-3d-printing-has-come-since-good-morning-america-1989.html

      I found this video amusing and sad at the same time. It reminds me of how little has changed from suppliers like 3D Systems in over 20 years. It also includes much of the same hype that still hasn't reached the masses, like that tidbit on cosmetic surgery.

      It's more evidence of how patents tend to stifle innovation when management decides to just sit on things vs push on to the next challenge.

      Direct link to the youtube video:
      http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NpRDuJ5YgoQ
    • Graham Stabler
      I am a big fan of 3D printing and RP etc (duh) but it gets to me how the media act like it is something so new. The low cost end is pretty new but it needn t
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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        I am a big fan of 3D printing and RP etc (duh) but it gets to me how the media act like it is something so new. The low cost end is pretty new but it needn't of been, it was just that the market was not seen and how to you charge big bucks to the industrial side if the low end machines are so cheap? I also see continued mentions of printing guns and the like as if 3D printers are a big danger, they might as well call a lathe a danger. What they don't realize is the cost of metal based 3D systems and those are not so likely to go down in price due to their use of big scary lasers.

        I think there are interesting things to come especially on the medical side but I'm not sure the ability to print a new knob for your cooker is going to put a machine in every home. We also need to teach people something about mechanical engineering and CAD but the printers should help on that front.

        Graham


        On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 2:01 PM, arthur2shedsj <arthur2shedsj@...> wrote:
         

        http://www.3ders.org/articles/20130226-how-far-3d-printing-has-come-since-good-morning-america-1989.html

        I found this video amusing and sad at the same time. It reminds me of how little has changed from suppliers like 3D Systems in over 20 years. It also includes much of the same hype that still hasn't reached the masses, like that tidbit on cosmetic surgery.

        It's more evidence of how patents tend to stifle innovation when management decides to just sit on things vs push on to the next challenge.

        Direct link to the youtube video:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=NpRDuJ5YgoQ


      • Randy
        I d like to ask some questions of the group even though I don t normally do anything but monitor this group. I have had and can get a Xenon light source that
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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          I’d like to ask some questions of the group even though I don’t normally do anything but monitor this group.

          I have had and can get a Xenon light source that used to cure conformal coatings (I don’t remember the wattage or wave length, I’d have to do some research).  In the system I’ve worked with, they use a light pipe to allow the light source to be stationary while moving the end about to cure a large area.  The light delivered is defused/defocused to cure as large as area as possible.

          Using this concept, could a fixed focus lens be fitted to the end of the light pipe, that instead of defocusing the beam, focuses it into a small spot.  The end of the light pipe and the focusing lens would be mounted to a positional X-Y stage and use a vertical tank to move the surface of the material/part into the focus area of the lens?

          The concept would, because of the higher power available with the Xenon lamp, allow the direct fusing of plastic powder which would be somewhat easier to deal with as opposed to a liquid.  The media, plastic powder, would not be so picky to the curing wavelength but power delivery to the area would.

          Could somebody punch holes in this concept for me?     

           

          R Wink

        • Graham Stabler
          Can you explain the light guide? Is it a bunch of fibres? Your idea is to fuse a powder? I assume with heat? That means you need IR content, fibres tend to
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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            Can you explain the light guide? Is it a bunch of fibres?

            Your idea is to fuse a powder? I assume with heat? That means you need IR content, fibres tend to strip all that out, you get quite a cold light out of them.

            Graham



            On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 3:14 PM, Randy <rwwink@...> wrote:
             

            I’d like to ask some questions of the group even though I don’t normally do anything but monitor this group.

            I have had and can get a Xenon light source that used to cure conformal coatings (I don’t remember the wattage or wave length, I’d have to do some research).  In the system I’ve worked with, they use a light pipe to allow the light source to be stationary while moving the end about to cure a large area.  The light delivered is defused/defocused to cure as large as area as possible.

            Using this concept, could a fixed focus lens be fitted to the end of the light pipe, that instead of defocusing the beam, focuses it into a small spot.  The end of the light pipe and the focusing lens would be mounted to a positional X-Y stage and use a vertical tank to move the surface of the material/part into the focus area of the lens?

            The concept would, because of the higher power available with the Xenon lamp, allow the direct fusing of plastic powder which would be somewhat easier to deal with as opposed to a liquid.  The media, plastic powder, would not be so picky to the curing wavelength but power delivery to the area would.

            Could somebody punch holes in this concept for me?     

             

            R Wink


          • oswaldonfire
            If you re looking to transmit high amounts of IR in the tens or hundreds of Watts range for heating/fusing applications, normal Silica glass fiber won t do the
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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              If you're looking to transmit high amounts of IR in the tens or hundreds of Watts range for heating/fusing applications, normal Silica glass fiber won't do the job at all. You're looking for a specialty soft glass Fluoride fiber that is formulated with rare earth elements to allow it to transmit IR, and these don't come cheap. I work as an engineer in a facility where we manufacture all these different kinds of optical fibers, and these types of fibers sell for >$700-800 per meter of a single fiber, easily.

              -Chris

              Graham Stabler <grezmos@...> wrote:
               

              Can you explain the light guide? Is it a bunch of fibres?


              Your idea is to fuse a powder? I assume with heat? That means you need IR content, fibres tend to strip all that out, you get quite a cold light out of them.

              Graham



              On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 3:14 PM, Randy <rwwink@...> wrote:
               

              I’d like to ask some questions of the group even though I don’t normally do anything but monitor this group.

              I have had and can get a Xenon light source that used to cure conformal coatings (I don’t remember the wattage or wave length, I’d have to do some research).  In the system I’ve worked with, they use a light pipe to allow the light source to be stationary while moving the end about to cure a large area.  The light delivered is defused/defocused to cure as large as area as possible.

              Using this concept, could a fixed focus lens be fitted to the end of the light pipe, that instead of defocusing the beam, focuses it into a small spot.  The end of the light pipe and the focusing lens would be mounted to a positional X-Y stage and use a vertical tank to move the surface of the material/part into the focus area of the lens?

              The concept would, because of the higher power available with the Xenon lamp, allow the direct fusing of plastic powder which would be somewhat easier to deal with as opposed to a liquid.  The media, plastic powder, would not be so picky to the curing wavelength but power delivery to the area would.

              Could somebody punch holes in this concept for me?     

               

              R Wink


            • Randy
              Yes. It s a bundle of glass fibers. Has to be glass as plastic won t take the heat. To continue, I ve used this type of system to melt and reflow solder in
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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                Yes.  It’s a bundle of glass fibers.  Has to be glass as plastic won’t take the heat.

                To continue, I’ve used this type of system to melt and reflow solder in conjunction with a robot to remove and replace bad  components on a PCB.  There’s a good bit of heat even in the defused state.  I haven’t used a lens to sharpen the focus and was wondering if I could and if it would product acceptable components.

                To recap; Instead of using laser with all of the hardware and problems, I was wondering IF I could get nearly the same effect using a Xenon system.

                 

                R Wink

                 

                From: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com [mailto:diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Graham Stabler
                Sent: Friday, March 01, 2013 9:45 AM
                To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] RE: Xenon printing

                 

                 

                Can you explain the light guide? Is it a bunch of fibres?

                 

                Your idea is to fuse a powder? I assume with heat? That means you need IR content, fibres tend to strip all that out, you get quite a cold light out of them.

                 

                Graham

                 

                 

                On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 3:14 PM, Randy <rwwink@...> wrote:

                 

                I’d like to ask some questions of the group even though I don’t normally do anything but monitor this group.

                I have had and can get a Xenon light source that used to cure conformal coatings (I don’t remember the wattage or wave length, I’d have to do some research).  In the system I’ve worked with, they use a light pipe to allow the light source to be stationary while moving the end about to cure a large area.  The light delivered is defused/defocused to cure as large as area as possible.

                Using this concept, could a fixed focus lens be fitted to the end of the light pipe, that instead of defocusing the beam, focuses it into a small spot.  The end of the light pipe and the focusing lens would be mounted to a positional X-Y stage and use a vertical tank to move the surface of the material/part into the focus area of the lens?

                The concept would, because of the higher power available with the Xenon lamp, allow the direct fusing of plastic powder which would be somewhat easier to deal with as opposed to a liquid.  The media, plastic powder, would not be so picky to the curing wavelength but power delivery to the area would.

                Could somebody punch holes in this concept for me?     

                 

                R Wink

                 

                No virus found in this message.
                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                Version: 2013.0.2899 / Virus Database: 2641/6135 - Release Date: 02/26/13

              • Randy
                I had used a system as I described in the late ’80’s-early ‘90’s to modify PCB’s by de-soldering and re-soldering the components with the light pipe.
                Message 7 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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                  I had used a system as I described in the late ’80’s-early ‘90’s to modify PCB’s by de-soldering and re-soldering the components with the light pipe.  As I remember, the cable heated a good bit and we needed to watch the cycle time of the lamp to prevent meltdown.

                   

                  R Wink

                   

                  From: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com [mailto:diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of chrismarion@...
                  Sent: Friday, March 01, 2013 9:56 AM
                  To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: Re: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] RE: Xenon printing

                   

                   

                  If you're looking to transmit high amounts of IR in the tens or hundreds of Watts range for heating/fusing applications, normal Silica glass fiber won't do the job at all. You're looking for a specialty soft glass Fluoride fiber that is formulated with rare earth elements to allow it to transmit IR, and these don't come cheap. I work as an engineer in a facility where we manufacture all these different kinds of optical fibers, and these types of fibers sell for >$700-800 per meter of a single fiber, easily.

                  -Chris

                  Graham Stabler <grezmos@...> wrote:

                   

                  Can you explain the light guide? Is it a bunch of fibres?

                   

                  Your idea is to fuse a powder? I assume with heat? That means you need IR content, fibres tend to strip all that out, you get quite a cold light out of them.

                   

                  Graham

                   

                   

                  On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 3:14 PM, Randy <rwwink@...> wrote:

                   

                  I’d like to ask some questions of the group even though I don’t normally do anything but monitor this group.

                  I have had and can get a Xenon light source that used to cure conformal coatings (I don’t remember the wattage or wave length, I’d have to do some research).  In the system I’ve worked with, they use a light pipe to allow the light source to be stationary while moving the end about to cure a large area.  The light delivered is defused/defocused to cure as large as area as possible.

                  Using this concept, could a fixed focus lens be fitted to the end of the light pipe, that instead of defocusing the beam, focuses it into a small spot.  The end of the light pipe and the focusing lens would be mounted to a positional X-Y stage and use a vertical tank to move the surface of the material/part into the focus area of the lens?

                  The concept would, because of the higher power available with the Xenon lamp, allow the direct fusing of plastic powder which would be somewhat easier to deal with as opposed to a liquid.  The media, plastic powder, would not be so picky to the curing wavelength but power delivery to the area would.

                  Could somebody punch holes in this concept for me?     

                   

                  R Wink

                   

                  No virus found in this message.
                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  Version: 2013.0.2899 / Virus Database: 2641/6135 - Release Date: 02/26/13

                • Graham Stabler
                  Looks like you have the expensive fibres! With a pinch of salt: If the light emanating from an area on the end of the fibre equal to the size of the spot you
                  Message 8 of 8 , Mar 1, 2013
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                    Looks like you have the expensive fibres!

                    With a pinch of salt:

                    If the light emanating from an area on the end of the fibre equal to the size of the spot you want can melt the material in that spot then you can do it. But basically because of the nature of the source (which we would consider the end of the fibre) although you can make a small image of it you are unlikely to be able to really focus it, i.e. in making a small version of it you lose most of your light.

                    A point source creates a circular wave, that can be straightened by a lens or collimated into a plane wave and then at some later stage focused again with another lens, reversing the process (a tube laser is like a distant point source) when the source is "extended" then you have lots of little circular waves which are then collimated in to lots of plane waves all at slightly different directions, it is not possible to unravel that mess to create a single circular wave forming a point focus, the best you can do is recreate the original extended source as far as intensity goes.

                    That's my understanding of it. So you might be able to add an aperture at the fibres end or at a conjugate plane and then focus that but that may filter out too much light. It depends on the fibre size and the expected focus,

                    Graham

                    On Fri, Mar 1, 2013 at 4:26 PM, Randy <rwwink@...> wrote:
                     

                    Yes.  It’s a bundle of glass fibers.  Has to be glass as plastic won’t take the heat.

                    To continue, I’ve used this type of system to melt and reflow solder in conjunction with a robot to remove and replace bad  components on a PCB.  There’s a good bit of heat even in the defused state.  I haven’t used a lens to sharpen the focus and was wondering if I could and if it would product acceptable components.

                    To recap; Instead of using laser with all of the hardware and problems, I was wondering IF I could get nearly the same effect using a Xenon system.

                     

                    R Wink

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