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Re: another good part 2

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  • jwanett
    Sorry!!! I answered the wrong mail!!
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 19, 2013
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      Sorry!!!

      I answered the wrong mail!!

      : )

      --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, joan raven <jonichk@...> wrote:
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      > WoWWW!!!
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      > The show first layer in red works perfect!
      > I was able to load the .zip file with the png's that u sent me.
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      > One think that I noticed is slic3r or even magics RP, produces slices with very pixelated borders (aliased)...U can see this clearly in the prints (more on big curved surfaces).
      > I was thinking maybe there are a antialiasing filter or watever that can soften al little bit the jagged contours.
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      > I found this:
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      > http://wiki.panotools.org/PanoTools_Anti_Aliasing_Filters.
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      > Maybe is asking u too much...: )
      > Anyway, your software is becoming mature very fast, And I expect it can be the "standard" in the open source-reprap style for dlp printers soon!!!
      >
      > To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
      > From: arthur2shedsj@...
      > Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2013 00:44:57 +0000
      > Subject: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: another good part 2
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      > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Ben Mahony wrote:
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      > > Pumps in commercial printers run nearly constantly depending on width and
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      > > saturation levels of the print job, or if they are recirculating the white
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      > > resin.
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      > Maybe you found one that does since it also must have been designed for cheap white UV ink that doesn't have a stable dispersion of white pigment since it needs to continuously recirculate the ink.
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      > What viscosity are the resins being used, I don't know the
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      > > shrinkage rate on the printing resins but they have 0 evaporation
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      > > component, so wouldn't imagine they shrink that much, and if you apply a
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      > > full coat there is no visible crazing that might suggest shrinkage. They
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      > > are fully cured in a single pass of 20watts of uv light.
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      > UV inkjet inks are typically 100% solids but maybe not in your case since they also need to recirculate the white ink. Maybe they cut other corners as well?
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      > >But there is little concern for shrinking.
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      > Some low viscosity monomers will shrink up to 20% that are used in inks. The printers only put down a layer of ink a few microns thick so it's not really much of a concern.
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      > Anyway I'll test
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      > > some next week. I guess the issue is they are formulated for very narrow
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      > > sensativity 385nm plus minus 5nm, basically uneffected by visable light.
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      > > So standard projectors might not have any or enough output at 385nm?
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      > Most UV inks cure at 365nm and under. Not really a narrow range, but 285-370nm is pretty common. I'm a bit intrigued as to what oddball printer and UV ink it is that you have managed to come across.
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