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Re: another good part 2

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  • arthur2shedsj
    ... Maybe you found one that does since it also must have been designed for cheap white UV ink that doesn t have a stable dispersion of white pigment since it
    Message 1 of 29 , Feb 18, 2013
      --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Ben Mahony <ben.mahony@...> wrote:
      >
      > Pumps in commercial printers run nearly constantly depending on width and
      > saturation levels of the print job, or if they are recirculating the white
      > resin.

      Maybe you found one that does since it also must have been designed for cheap white UV ink that doesn't have a stable dispersion of white pigment since it needs to continuously recirculate the ink.

      What viscosity are the resins being used, I don't know the
      > shrinkage rate on the printing resins but they have 0 evaporation
      > component, so wouldn't imagine they shrink that much, and if you apply a
      > full coat there is no visible crazing that might suggest shrinkage. They
      > are fully cured in a single pass of 20watts of uv light.

      UV inkjet inks are typically 100% solids but maybe not in your case since they also need to recirculate the white ink. Maybe they cut other corners as well?

      >But there is little concern for shrinking.

      Some low viscosity monomers will shrink up to 20% that are used in inks. The printers only put down a layer of ink a few microns thick so it's not really much of a concern.

      Anyway I'll test
      > some next week. I guess the issue is they are formulated for very narrow
      > sensativity 385nm plus minus 5nm, basically uneffected by visable light.
      > So standard projectors might not have any or enough output at 385nm?

      Most UV inks cure at 365nm and under. Not really a narrow range, but 285-370nm is pretty common. I'm a bit intrigued as to what oddball printer and UV ink it is that you have managed to come across.
    • Benjamin Mahony
      I think all UV printers currently available that support White ink, use either recirculation, vibration or rocking to stop settlement in the white ink, I
      Message 2 of 29 , Feb 18, 2013
        I think all UV printers currently available that support White ink, use either recirculation, vibration or rocking to stop settlement in the white ink,  I personally have experience with HP Scitex and Sun innovation neo printers but have also been around a lot of others they all had recirculation for the white,  Titanium dioxide is heavy and settles out, there are some other pigments but titanium oxide is the only one that lasts, for more than one year outdoors.  
        I believe one manufacture of ink, Momentive, has a patent on non recirculating white but I'm not aware of any others that work.   Though it is a constantly improving area and maybe some leaps have been made in the last 12months that I'm not aware of.
        Also the printers we use do not only put down a few micron thick layer of ink, we can lay down 1/8mm thick per pass.   hence we can achieve 1mm of thickness in 8 passes, this is used to achieve textured finishes. 

        The link I sent earlier, that was for a pump from Ali-express might not be ideal, it's very cheap but also uses a brushed motor, so I agree not the best thing for continues operation, I just thought it was the right price for someone that wanted to test the idea and I think it would not over heat from continues operation but may wear out but at least it would not dissolve in a heap, which is likely if some one used a generic irrigation pump.

        Benjamin Mahony



        On 19/02/2013 11:44 AM, arthur2shedsj wrote:
         



        --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Ben Mahony wrote:
        >
        > Pumps in commercial printers run nearly constantly depending on width and
        > saturation levels of the print job, or if they are recirculating the white
        > resin.

        Maybe you found one that does since it also must have been designed for cheap white UV ink that doesn't have a stable dispersion of white pigment since it needs to continuously recirculate the ink.

        What viscosity are the resins being used, I don't know the
        > shrinkage rate on the printing resins but they have 0 evaporation
        > component, so wouldn't imagine they shrink that much, and if you apply a
        > full coat there is no visible crazing that might suggest shrinkage. They
        > are fully cured in a single pass of 20watts of uv light.

        UV inkjet inks are typically 100% solids but maybe not in your case since they also need to recirculate the white ink. Maybe they cut other corners as well?

        >But there is little concern for shrinking.

        Some low viscosity monomers will shrink up to 20% that are used in inks. The printers only put down a layer of ink a few microns thick so it's not really much of a concern.

        Anyway I'll test
        > some next week. I guess the issue is they are formulated for very narrow
        > sensativity 385nm plus minus 5nm, basically uneffected by visable light.
        > So standard projectors might not have any or enough output at 385nm?

        Most UV inks cure at 365nm and under. Not really a narrow range, but 285-370nm is pretty common. I'm a bit intrigued as to what oddball printer and UV ink it is that you have managed to come across.


      • joan raven
        WoWWW!!! The show first layer in red works perfect! I was able to load the .zip file with the png s that u sent me. One think that I noticed is slic3r or even
        Message 3 of 29 , Feb 19, 2013
          WoWWW!!!

          The show first layer in red works perfect!
          I was able to load the .zip file with the png's that u sent me.

          One think that I noticed is slic3r or even magics RP, produces slices with very pixelated borders (aliased)...U can see this clearly in the prints (more on big curved surfaces).
          I was thinking maybe there are a antialiasing filter or watever that can soften al little bit the  jagged contours.

          I found this:

          http://wiki.panotools.org/PanoTools_Anti_Aliasing_Filters.


          Maybe is asking u too much...: )
          Anyway, your software is becoming mature very fast, And I expect it can be the "standard" in the open source-reprap style for dlp printers soon!!!


          To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
          From: arthur2shedsj@...
          Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2013 00:44:57 +0000
          Subject: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: another good part 2

           


          --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Ben Mahony wrote:
          >
          > Pumps in commercial printers run nearly constantly depending on width and
          > saturation levels of the print job, or if they are recirculating the white
          > resin.

          Maybe you found one that does since it also must have been designed for cheap white UV ink that doesn't have a stable dispersion of white pigment since it needs to continuously recirculate the ink.

          What viscosity are the resins being used, I don't know the
          > shrinkage rate on the printing resins but they have 0 evaporation
          > component, so wouldn't imagine they shrink that much, and if you apply a
          > full coat there is no visible crazing that might suggest shrinkage. They
          > are fully cured in a single pass of 20watts of uv light.

          UV inkjet inks are typically 100% solids but maybe not in your case since they also need to recirculate the white ink. Maybe they cut other corners as well?

          >But there is little concern for shrinking.

          Some low viscosity monomers will shrink up to 20% that are used in inks. The printers only put down a layer of ink a few microns thick so it's not really much of a concern.

          Anyway I'll test
          > some next week. I guess the issue is they are formulated for very narrow
          > sensativity 385nm plus minus 5nm, basically uneffected by visable light.
          > So standard projectors might not have any or enough output at 385nm?

          Most UV inks cure at 365nm and under. Not really a narrow range, but 285-370nm is pretty common. I'm a bit intrigued as to what oddball printer and UV ink it is that you have managed to come across.


        • jwanett
          Sorry!!! I answered the wrong mail!!
          Message 4 of 29 , Feb 19, 2013
            Sorry!!!

            I answered the wrong mail!!

            : )

            --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, joan raven <jonichk@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > WoWWW!!!
            >
            > The show first layer in red works perfect!
            > I was able to load the .zip file with the png's that u sent me.
            >
            > One think that I noticed is slic3r or even magics RP, produces slices with very pixelated borders (aliased)...U can see this clearly in the prints (more on big curved surfaces).
            > I was thinking maybe there are a antialiasing filter or watever that can soften al little bit the jagged contours.
            >
            > I found this:
            >
            > http://wiki.panotools.org/PanoTools_Anti_Aliasing_Filters.
            >
            >
            > Maybe is asking u too much...: )
            > Anyway, your software is becoming mature very fast, And I expect it can be the "standard" in the open source-reprap style for dlp printers soon!!!
            >
            > To: diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com
            > From: arthur2shedsj@...
            > Date: Tue, 19 Feb 2013 00:44:57 +0000
            > Subject: [diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication] Re: another good part 2
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            > --- In diy_3d_printing_and_fabrication@yahoogroups.com, Ben Mahony wrote:
            >
            > >
            >
            > > Pumps in commercial printers run nearly constantly depending on width and
            >
            > > saturation levels of the print job, or if they are recirculating the white
            >
            > > resin.
            >
            >
            >
            > Maybe you found one that does since it also must have been designed for cheap white UV ink that doesn't have a stable dispersion of white pigment since it needs to continuously recirculate the ink.
            >
            >
            >
            > What viscosity are the resins being used, I don't know the
            >
            > > shrinkage rate on the printing resins but they have 0 evaporation
            >
            > > component, so wouldn't imagine they shrink that much, and if you apply a
            >
            > > full coat there is no visible crazing that might suggest shrinkage. They
            >
            > > are fully cured in a single pass of 20watts of uv light.
            >
            >
            >
            > UV inkjet inks are typically 100% solids but maybe not in your case since they also need to recirculate the white ink. Maybe they cut other corners as well?
            >
            >
            >
            > >But there is little concern for shrinking.
            >
            >
            >
            > Some low viscosity monomers will shrink up to 20% that are used in inks. The printers only put down a layer of ink a few microns thick so it's not really much of a concern.
            >
            >
            >
            > Anyway I'll test
            >
            > > some next week. I guess the issue is they are formulated for very narrow
            >
            > > sensativity 385nm plus minus 5nm, basically uneffected by visable light.
            >
            > > So standard projectors might not have any or enough output at 385nm?
            >
            >
            >
            > Most UV inks cure at 365nm and under. Not really a narrow range, but 285-370nm is pretty common. I'm a bit intrigued as to what oddball printer and UV ink it is that you have managed to come across.
            >
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